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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, April 22, 1910, Image 12

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1910-04-22/ed-1/seq-12/

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FRIDAY, APRIL 22, 1910.
GIRL LEADS STRIKERS IN
FIGHT AGAINST BIG TRUST
LOUreVtLLB, Ky.. April 21.—
One girl, and not a very big girl at
that, accomplished what Wall
street, the legislature and govern
ment investigators failed to do,
when she forced the American To
bacco Co. to shut two immense
stemmeries and practically close a
plug tobacco factory.
£his girl Is Lulu Spaulding, "the
gWI in blue," who led the striking
stommers of Louisville. She beat [
the trust to a standstill and landed
a blow at the financial center of
the big concern.
June 15 a law Imposing a tax,
of 2 cents per pound on the manu
facture of plug tobacco becomes
effective. The trust bent every ef
fort to manufacture as many plugs
as possible before June 15, but the
1 strike has blasted this hope. Not
nNyiy plugs are being made.
LuW Spauldlng lives with her
mother and sister In-law, In a
West Louisville alley home. The
women have worked for years In I
the stemmery. Miss Spauldlng, a j
frail, delicate girl of 21, plain and
unassuming, has a chin that de
notes firmness and determination.
Miss Spaulding sees victory for
the cause she has championed. She
Is the leader of 2500 striking men,
women and children, arrayed
against the might of a great trust
with millions behind It.
Like a Joan d'Arc she has led
her army, appointing lieutenants,
perfecting her organization and
carrying on her work uncounseled.
For I_> years she worked in the
stemmery, being forced to leave
school to help support the family
When she went to the plant
Lulu Spalding was n red-cheeked,
healthy child. Today her face
shows the mark of the dust-filled
rooms and her frame la no longer
robust. The tobacco trust has
taken Its toll.
She says the strikers will win
because they represent right. "All
A Wonderful Lot of
Brilliant Bargain
Events in
Wentwortlis
Large, New, 2d Floor
Bargain Annex
$ 13.95
for choice of a splendid line of
men's and young men's suits
worth regularly up to $25 each.
All sizes.
$3.98
for choice of a good line of men's
"J. & M." $6 and $7 black and
tan oxfords.
$1.63 for choice of a good variety of children
shoes, worth up to $2.75 per pair
for the famous 500 "President" suspenders,
sf* a pair for 10c canvas gloves.
88** for all union made $1.00 overalls and jaokets.
for choice of a big line of men's new spring $1.00 negligee shirts.
All working-men's trousers on sale at greatly reduced prices.
3 Pairs for 25«? for regular 15c plain and fancy cotton sox.
39c* for choice of a lot of boys' straight knee and knieker pants, worth up to
$1.25 per pair.
23<* for choice of a fino assortment of boys' caps, worth up to $1.25 each,
for men's 750 muslin uightrobes.
Here is the place to save money. Shop in the morning if possible.
WENTWORTH
Clothing House
LULU BPAULDING, THE GIRL
IN ULUE.
wo ask Is to be treated like human
beings," she declared vehemently.
"W\? have hart to work or
[ starve. Bat something was wrong,
Ine scales didn't leent to work
I right I mart'- $*.or> the week be
! fore the Strike. Others made less
We couldn't pay rent add scarcely
had enough to eat,
"As I sat in that dust filled room
; the afternoon of the strike and
thought of tho warm, foul-smelling
water the dirty Wash tank, and the
six glrli who had fainted because
lof the hot room —remembering that
in one day last summer 75 women
fainted at work and were carried
Entrance 709 Riverside Avenue
from the stemmery room on
stretchers —I couldn't stand it any
longer. 1 jumped to my feet, cry
ing, 'Strike for your rights, girls.
Follow me.'
"In a moment they were on their
feet and followed me out of the
room. We called out the boys and
m»n, and then, at the head of 500,
1 went to the colored stemmery.
"There I lumped upon a keg and
called to the workers to follow me.
'We'll follow the girl In blue,' they
said. That's where I got the name."
For the first time in the history
of a southern city whites and ne
groes are banded in a common
cause.
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
SANHPOINT, Idaho, April 22.—
Miss Nellie Pedwell and George M.
i Winne, a civil engineer, were ma
rooned all Sunday night long on
i Lake Pend dOreille because of
the breaking of the gas engine on
i Winne's launch. Winne tried to
paddle ashore, but the paddle
broke when they were still a con
siderable distance from land, and
they were again carried out into
the lake by the chilly night wind.
Charles E. Schaefer rescued them,
, finding Winne nearly frozen. The
' girl was in quite comfortable con
! dltion, as her companion had coy
' ered her with his overcoat and oth
jer cloth and cushions he had in
the launch.
NORTH YAKIMA.—After a 125
--mile trip in George Arrowsmith's
automobile, Governor Hay has re
turned from an inspection of the
plans for the Strahorn power canal.
Paragon Millinery Co., 817 Riv
erside. We make a specialty of
dress hats at, f 4 95.
The New York Sample Store
Corner Sprague and Lincoln
"The House of Bargains"
The biggest and best sample
store in Spoka;,e. You save
one third to one-half.
THE, SPOKANE PRESS
Theatrical
MACLYN ARBUCKLE IN
"THE ROUNDUP"
A production which, for various
reasons, ought to make a special
appeal to Spokane audiences, will
be seen at the Auditorium com
mencing Sunday night, when "The
Roundup" will be presented for the
first time in this city. "The
"Roundup" has been one of the
genuine successes of the past sea
son in New York, and the charac
ter of the commendations given it
have been impressive. The play
has been called a melodrama, but
it Is said that the authors have
shown that big, thrMling melodrama
need not be marred by pseudo
heroics and patent sentiment. Thus,
there are indications that the play
as a play will merit the patronage
of local theatergoers. There are
other reasons why the engage
ment should be out of ths ordi
nary. Heading the big company
which has been appearing in "The
Roundup" since the original New
York production was made, is Mac
lyn Arbuckle, a player who has
won a most generous measure of
success.
POUR NIGHTS, STARTING SUN
DAY, APRIL 24.
MATINEE WEDNESDAY.
Klaw & Erlanger's GigauUc
Production
with
MACLYN ARBUCKLE
The same great production wit
nessed in New York and Chicago
for over a year in each city.
134 PEOPLE 20 HORSES
COWBOYS INDIANS
PRICES—SOc to $1.50.
Seats now on sale.
Wall Paper
at a
Saving
EVERY ONE WHO ENTERS
your house learns something about
you from your walls. Your walls
will tell of your best Judgment and
most critical taste if you will
paper them from our selection of
exclusive and beautiful new pat
terns.
Get. estimates on painting and
kalsomining.
Eastern Wall Paper Co.
Phone Main 7764. 4 Riverside Aye.
Ratliff Says:
Don't Overlook
VERA
Trices of living may go
up in the city and wages
may go down until you
find it next to impossible
to make a living-—but a
living is always guaran
teed to the man who comes
to Vera. Put in the same
time and energy at Vera
and you will not only have
the best kind of a living
for yourself nnd family
hut you will have land
that has a great value in
itself.
Vera is only 5V2 miles
from Spokano—it reel ear
service, best of schools—
in fact all the advantages
of the city, minus its un
desirable qualities.
Vera solves the living
question.
SllO Howard Street
Phone Main 8673
Spokane and Colfax
— —I
Th» Oally mid Sunday Bi>»Wune
Pitas, ltf wmu * KNk j
11-YEAR-OLD OIRL S PATHETIC
LETTER SECURES PARDON FOR MOTHER
ST. PAUL, April 22.—Governor
Eborhart wrote a letter today to
Mi.ss Ruth Coffey, 11 years old,
daughter of Mrs. Ella Coffey, six
months a convict In the state peni
tentiary at Stillwater, telling the
little girl her mother had been
freed.
The little girl first wrote to
Forced
Vacate
We must vacate soon. We have no
place to move. We must sacrifice
$75,000 worth of dry goods, clothing,
shoes, cloaks, suits, millinery, furnish
ing goods at any price. Buy now, today.
Come, look over the goods, you will find
everything reduced. Sale going on now.
Open Saturday evening till 10 p. m.
15e ladies' black
vests OC
19c knit corset 1 Q
covers and vesta.. X a-iC
12Vjc ladies' or Q
child's hose J/C
25c ladies' or 1 »T
child's hose X I C
$1.25 men's
pants # OC
75c boys' QkQ/»
pants OI7C
$,'? boys'long 4»| QE>
corduroy pants%P JL et/O
$2.00 boys' <t»l OQ
suits *P 1
$20 men's (1 1 Qfi
suits tp 1 1 .OO
$C.OO ladies' <hO QC
dress skirts. . .tpO.J/O
85c ladies'
waists OOC
$5.00 ladies' *»o, Qfi
hats «PZ<«%7O
$:,.00 ladies' d»-| Qfi
pumps <P 1 t*/D
$1.50 children's AO
shoes i7ol*
50c infants' Of
shoes OOC
$1.25 children's OA
shoes 01/ C
$1.75 boys' andd» 4 QC
youths' shoes .«P 1 «00
$10.00 men's tf»C QC
suits %pO«t/0
4<V boys' OC
shirts «COC
50c men's un- QQ_
derwear Ot/C
85c men's coat CQ
shirts 017 C
40c men's under- OC
wear muC
$1.00 union suits, •T'C
men's / OC
50c men's work QQ
shirts OZ/C
40c men's & boys' Qg
straw hats ZDC
THE BOSTON STORE
Nathan
Weil,
Proprietor
Governor Eberhart last week, ask
ing for the pardon of her mother,
and this dainty but wandering lat
ter was the only appeal the state
pardon* board heard. Tho letter
follows, in part:
"Dear Governor: —I am a little
girl of 11 years. I be* of you to
free my mama that is in prison In
to
20c men's + i
hose X X C
40c boys' bib
overalls muC
$2.00 ladies' Of
oxfords «p A cOO
780 boys' bib CQ
overalls %J*S\*
25c wash f f\
ties lUC
$1.25 ladies' can- 'TIS —
vas oxfords / OC
$3.50 men's QC
shoes, oxfords «p*£*Oo
$2.50 men's QQ
shoes «J> 1 eO V
$3.00 men's d»-| Qf
pants %p L *«70
bSrT: 2y 2 c
5c envelopes,
package OC
8 l-3c India /»
linon, yard OC
15c bolt ribbon, * (\*%
5 yards, bolt 1 UC
75c children's CQ
dresses OJ/C
$1.50 moire Qftr»
petticoats J/OC
12V20 Turkish O
towels, each OC
25c sun -I Q
bonnets X »7v
$1.50 ladies' no
wrappers I*7 OC
25e short -I m
kimonos A <J\*
$11.95 silk Cf|
rain coats «p / •OvP
$5 linen wash (tf*Q QC
suits, ladies'. . «P«£««70
50c wire hat
frames OOC
Ise lawns, q
yard «7C
8 l-3o towels, C
each OC
Stillwater. I have, two little sinters.
>ne of th«»m nine and one of them
th tee. nnd a little brother of one
year old We are so lonesome
without mama. We have no home.
My little sisters and brother and
I cry day and night for mama to
eomo home to us."
The governor said he entrusted
the future life of her mother to
her daughter, and wanted to hear
when she proves successful.
Tho Dally nr.cl Sunday Spokano
Prrsa, 10 cnts a week.
15c long cloth, f f
yard lIC
$2 house «jq
dresses «J> 1 •a£«7
75c muslin CO
drawers O«7C
35c corset OC
covers «£OC
35e wash OE?
silk 4LOC
$2.50 hat *j Af*
shapes «p 1 «HrO
75c boys' wash (Jq
suits Ot/C
50c flowers, all OC
kinds d£OC
$1.50 lace cur- QQ
tains, pair *70C
$1.50 pillows, Qg
3 pounds i/OC
ir.°. r : 48c
15c dotted swiss, j <
yard JL 1 C
8 1 /-:o apron ging- £*
ham, yard OC
$3.00 hand d»«| A(
bags tj) 1 »rO
$10 ladies' qj*
wash dresses.. «J)Oe*t/3
500 collar 1 p*
sets 1 DC
$1.25 cor- QQ
sots O*7C
$1.50 hod d»1 f\f\
spreads «p 1 AJvJ
7. r >c hand qa
bags *3e7C
7.V bolts; OA
ladies' OUC
65c 72x00 oq
sheets Oet/C
350 hoys' OC
waists ZDC
J7.5Q d»C QC
trunks %p<J »ZJ\J
35c combs and I ■*
barrettes 1 OC
Temple Court
Block, 406-8
Riverside Ay.
TONIGHT
Mr. William A. Brady
Announces
Mr. Mantell
in
King Lear
Tomorrow afternoon,
"ROMEO AND JULIET"
Tomorrow night,
"RICHARD HI"
Evenings—soc to $2.00.
Matinee, 50c to $1.50.
TOWIOHT AID AU WKBX
The Incomparable
D. S. Lawrence Stock Co.
with
Jane Vivian Kelton
In
The Mansfield Terslon of
"OLD
HEIDELBERG"
The Most Beautiful Flay of
Modern momanoe
Fifty People Used on the Stag's
Our prices: 250, Sso 50c. Saturday
Matinee 25c and BOc
Boxes and Divans 7So
Next week: "The Heir to the Hoorah"
2X77 APHorcnAm3U
MATINEE TODAY AND TONIGHT
▲nether Week of rum
Ret irn of the Favorite
"The Dublin Minstrel"
MS. FRANK FOOASTT
In Quaint, Humorous and Human
Observations
BMITH It CIUFBIIX
Presenting an InrldMt From Life
"Camping Oaf
jout wan ft 00.
In Ttiflr Comedy Plena Aot
"Mr. P. I. Barnuui. Jr."
■MILT oinn ft CO.
In
"A Minnesota Komuo*"
By Cbftft Horwlts
TIME BKOTHEBB MASCAttBO
Presenting
• Pun In a Drawing- Boom"
DEZBO ft POBCTBT
Novelty Musical and Singing Act
808 ft TIP CO.
Comedy Acrobats
Kovnra ftotubes
WASHINGTOM
THEATER 11
XIOK CLASS VAtrDETZLLS
Week Commencing Sunday Mefntt
April 17, 1910
Vaudeville's Latest Novelty
ES I Elf BUSLEiaK
Presents
The Oiri la, the Ballooa
"The Convincing Character Btar"
LAW WELCH ft CO.
In
"Levinsky's Old Shoes"
"The Pride or Melody I.ane"
(4) THE "TKOCADSBO («)
In a Humorous Repertoire
"Real Musi.- of a Unique Order"
BOUTON ft TXLLSOV
In
"A Tard of Music"
"Vaudeville's Checrie.it Trio"
WOLFE, MOOXB ft TOUVO
New tfui i> : • , In Songs and Dances
A Oenutne Wonder Act
FIELDS ft 00.
Incomparable Head and Hand
Balancers
msw motioh rxCTvmaa
Mil -i, daily at 2:JO. Two shows
every evening at 7:30 and I.
Prices 160 and 250,
Vantages
* THEATER
■. O. Walker, Mgr. Rhone M. 13S8
Week Commencing Sunday Matla.ee
April 17th
ALL STAR ACTS
La Bella N a pole Troupe
Blh'ht of the Best Italian Singing
aud Instrumental Artists Before
the Public 5 >d.«y.
Bstre Added Attraction
Daphne Pollard
Tounicest Recoanlied Australian
Comedienne of the Day— Kerm
erly Leading Lady with
Follard'a Lilliputian*,
Another Big Feature
Tinkham & Co.
Sensational Cyclists and Meter,
cycllata la Their
Cage of Death
Three Other Big Attractions
Matinee daily I:4a, any aeat lie.
Evening 1:30 and '. seats l&o and lie
Sea/horn's Mo sins Van will give
you the best service In tbe elty.
We also do a storage business. We
are at your service at aAf Uin%
I fmoae. Mulu 6M.
PAQI 11

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