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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, April 28, 1910, Image 8

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1910-04-28/ed-1/seq-8/

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THURSDAY, APRIL 28, 1910.
PLAYS PLAYERS
"CHAS., THE FIRST* TO SEE CHIEF
If Charles the First, the wonder
ful man-monkey, carries out the
same program next week in Spo
kane as he has in other cities, Spo
kane will see a lot of him. Charles
the First does not confine himself
to the theater. He is not the kind
of a monk that does a 15 minute
act and then retires behind the bars
of a oage on the stage. Not much!
His appearance at the Orpheum
is but a part of his life. He sleeps
PANTAGES—A big laugh from
start to finish is the act of the Har
per-Smlth Trio at the Pantagea this
week. A good, clean colored act,
without the usual run of slapstick
that Is a big relief from the old
style coon performance.
WASHINGTON—Tom Haverley
This Heater will heat
enough water for a bath in
twenty to twenty-five min
utes at a cost of 2 cents.
We stand back of this
statement all the time and
any time.
SpoKane Falls
Gas LigHt Co.
Every one presenting this adv. at our
office between 7 ami 9 p. in. April 28
will be Riven a Toaster Free.
JOSH L. WILSON
Sales
Stables
A OOOD
PLACE
TO BUY
HORSES
AT YOUR SERVICE.
217 West Indiana Aye. Telephone Max. 2351
in no cage, but at the best hotel, in
(he room with his trainer, Charles
Judge. Then be goes visiting. The
newspaper offices are never
slighted. His royal highness will
make the rounds of the editorial
sanctums, will take an automobile
ride, much as any other distin
guished visitor to Spokane would
do, and will be generally conspicu
ous. He even expects to make a call
on Chief of Police Sullivan during
the week.
and Corrine Wells, at the Washing
ton this week, have a decidedly
laughable number, entitled "Mr.
Piker vs. Miss Kidder," in which
some decidedly snappy dialogue is
introduced. . Loro and Pyne, two ac
robatic humorists, have a number
that is one big laugh.
Dorit
heat up the whole house just
to get enough water for a
bath; life is too short. Get
a Gas Water Heater like cut
and save time and money,
also labor.
Tee, I am the Ood
desa of Cookery,
Tou'U note I am a
smiling- laaat
The cause of my sat
isfaction lies
In the taot that I
oook with Gas.
TO EVERY
MAN A
SQUARE
DEAL
ALWAYS
PETER POWER WRITES
ON
DEMANDS OF
FARMERS' UNION
"BACK TO THE
FARM."
When representatives of the
3,000,000 members of the Farmers'
union meet in St. Louis May 2, one
of the chief demands that will be
made will be a call upon congress
to pass the bill appropriating funds
to establish a national agricultural
university.
The farmers declare that if man
ufacturers are to be protected by
tariffs and railways and steamship
combines by various subsidies, the
government should pass around its
"paternalism" and assist in educat
ing the husbandman to produce use
ful commodies in a scientific, com
mon sense way.
The slogan, "back to the farm," is
sweeping all over the country owing
to the unprecedented increase in
the cost of living. The farmers
want not only the boys, but the
girls as well, to remain on the land,
but they likewise want the old time
drudgery and toil substituted by the
latest and most improved methods
of production, not only to lighten
the labors of the agrarian workers,
but to cheapen the necessaries of
life for consumers in the cities.
The reading and thinking farm
ers are no longer deceived by the
false hopes that their sons can be
come great business men and their
daughters "new women" and lead
independent lives by rushing into
the cities. They have learned that
their boys. In most instances, are
fortunate if they can earn as much
as an average mechanic, and that
too many of their girls become "new
women" at beggarly wages in fac
tories, and not a few are forced
down into the red light districts in
the intensified competition for jobs
and fair living conditions.
"We want this great industry
placed upon the plane where It be
longs." said an officer of the farm
ers' union. "We want to draw our
boys and girls from the congested
centers, where disease and crime
are on the increase, to the country,
where health and morality are nat
ural, where true and noble man
hood and womanhood are given the
fullest expression."
The combination of farmers, min
ers and unionists seems to have
captured Australia. Brief special
cables to several American labor
papers state that In the general
elections just held the labor party
scored a signal triumph over the
protection conservatives and free
trade liberals and will probably
have a majority over both old par
ties.
The labor party Is credited with
having won 10 seats In the house
(one report places the gain at 17)
and six in the senate. This would
give the laborites 20 out of 36 mem
bers in the senate, and 37 seats In
the house In a total of 75, or one
short of an actual majority over
both old parties If the gain was 10
seats. If the laborites won 17 new
seats their majority will, of course,
be disputed.
In any event the labor party will
be the government in Australia
(strange sound, that!) and his royal
majesty's new premier will be An
drew Fisher, a common miner,
whose cabinet will probably em
brace a farmer, carpenter, printer
and a number of other mechanics.
There is little fear that the labor I
party can bo overthrown even by a,
combination of tho old parties, and
legislation along more radical lines
than ever before may be looked
for in Australia.
The Labor party is socialistic, de
claring for government ownership
of monopolies, single tax, old age
pensions and other popular re
forms. The principal cause that led
to the victory of the Labor party
at this time was the attempt of the
Australian mine owners and other
capitalists to import and enforce
the Open shop schemes practiced in
America, and outlaw the unions.
Great strikes were precipitated and
the greatest was at the ballot box. j
$100 REWARD
for the conviction of the party oi
parties claiming to bo agents or
solicitors of the Parisian Dyeing ft
Cleaning Works, 605 First avenue
b, A. Lebmann. prop.
The New York Sample Store
Corner Sprajjue and Lincoln
"Tho House of Bargains"
The biggest and best sample
store In Spokane. You save
one-third to one-half.
Tho Daily and Sunday Spokune
Press, 10 c-nta a week.
Forest Park Grocery
and Hardware Co.
02722-24-26 Monroe St.
HENRY McCULLOUGH, Prop.
Builders' Hardware
Paints, Oils, Glass, Graniteware, Tinware and Dishes.
Laurel Ranges
(iive us a call and we know we. can please you.
THE SPOKANE PRESS
A TTENDANCE SURPRISING
A T TUBURCULOSIS EXHII
i
Accustomed as he has been to
seeing large crowds at the eved
ing meetings in other cities, J. 81.B 1 .
Combs, in charge of the state tuber
culosis exhibit now on display i|»
the armory, Is rather surprised
that so few persons are attendink
the evening sessions here. j
The meeting last night was under
the direction of the Woman's club
of Spokane and not more than 100
persons were present to listen tp
the excellent addresses delivered
by prominent women of this city.
During the day 1100 children
from the Catholic schools visited
the Armory and 400 students of
Gonzaga college attended in a body
in the afternoon, accompanied by
their Instructors. The mothers of
Spokane are visiting the exhibit
this afternoon.
Following is the program for to
night.
Bruce M. Watson, chairman of
the meeting, will speak on "School
CITY FARMS AND FARM TEACHING IN CITY
SCHOOLS TO SOLVE HIGH COST OF LIVING
COLUMBUS, 0., April 28.—8y
recommending the establishment of
municipally owned farms, the teach
ing of agriculture in the schools of
the city and state, the establish
ment of secondary agricultural col
leges with experiment farms in
each county and other radical
changes from the established order
of things, the members of the Ohio
state legislative committee, ap
pointed to investigate the high
prices of food, have sounded a toc
sin calling Ohio's sister states to
action and struck at the same time
a blow against the food trust—the
hardest, by the way, which has yet
been delivered.
By teaching the primary princi
ples ot farming to children In the
schools and the establishing of ag
ricultural colleges in each county,
the legislators feel a new interest
would be created in farming which
would have a tendency to attract
the young men of the country to
the farms instead of to the city.
The establishment of a labor bu
reau, to be conducted by the state,
for the sole purpose of furnishing
labor for the farmers, is another de
cided innovation and one which the
farmers welcome. Every year the
farmers complain they are unable
to get men to help them in harvest
time, and every year about the
same time the cities are crowded
with unemployed.
Here is one significant statement
contained in the recommendations
of interest everywhere:
"Storage is doing for food what
banking has done for money. Stan
dardizing of prices is thus made
possible. Governments have fixed
the interest on money and they
should fix the profits on food."
Domestic science taught both
boys and girls In the public schools
would, the legislators believe,
make them familiar with the first
Every Day
A Bargain Day at
Our Store
100 Iba. Potatoes, good
stock OS*
Sweet Prunes, 5 Ibs..as<>
Marbest Flour, 49 lbs.
for »1.50
Why pay 25c or 30c more
more for an advertised brand
of flour that is no better. If
our flour does not please you
perfectly a trial will cost you
nothing.
Guaranteed Flour, a tittle
dark, 49 lbs. for f1.25
Walter Baker's Chocolate
and Cocoa, half pound.. .20«>
Wm. H. Baker's Chocolate
and Cocoa, half pound. . . 15<
Fresh Rhubarb, 6 lbs. .25<
Fresh Local Ranch Eggs,
now 25<
Success or Lady Aldine
Butter, 3 lbs. for fI.OO
Navel Oranges, sweet, seed
less, Chariot brand, box. . .laa.
A little better is enough;
better to make a change
worth while. '
MARR
Spot C»»n Qrocei
716 First Main 4286
We carry a full line of
Also a full line of
Phone Max. 2082
Sanitation and Ventilation:*' Other
addresses will be:
"The Moral Aspect of the Tuber
culosis Campaign," the Rev. Father
I.ouis Taelman, president of Gon
zaga college.
"The Necessity for the Regular
Examination of School Children
and Teachers," Dr. Charles Eiken
bary.
"The Scientific Aspect of the
Tuberculosis Treatment," Paul M.
Glasoe, former president Spokane
uollege.
"The Rural School, the Salvation
of the Physically Defective City
Child," Professor Sampson, presi
dent Cheney normal school, Che
ney, Wash.
"Pure Milk; What It Means and
How to Get It," Dr. S. D. Nelson,
professor of veterinary science,
science, Washington State college.
"Parks and Playgrounds," Earl
Constantine.
Stereoptlcon lecture. Dr. Charles
Doland.
I principles of domestic economy,
i That high food prices in this
; country are due directly to the
, growth of monopoly the legislators
: found. At the close of the harvest
j last year the supply of food per
capita in this country should have
been the largest in its history, and
At small cost a safety deposit
box will protect your valuable pa
pera
McCrea &Merryweather
Phono, Main 7181
Co ran Moward ana apra*ra*
RARTLETT-CARVER CO
THE WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S STORE OF SPOKANE
818 RIVERSIDE AVENUE 820
Millinery
Bargain
Days
$7.50 Hat Sale $7.50
Hand-made Turbans of such beauty and character that you immediately think
of $12.00 to $15.00 when you look at them. Large, fancy Chip Hats, flower and
grass trimmed; values away above what we ask, but tomorrow and Saturday they
go to swell the BIG BARGAIN WINDOW of millinery at $7.50
$10.00 Hat Sale $10.00
Genuine trimmed Leghorns—the shapes alone are worth the money—but we have
too many of them, and we must reduce the stock; also fine chips and other straws,
in all the big stunning shapes, with finest flower and grass trimmings; some very
choice turbans among the lot will find many admirers. All in one lot for Friday and
Saturday at , $10.00
A special sale of fine ostrich plumes in all colors. They were considered extra
good value at $8.50 —our regular price—the best values in Spokane at $5.35
Only a few of these, and it will pay you to see them early—they're big values
at ". $2.50
Remember the slogan—Bartlett-Carver Co. for bargains.
Sale of Suits and Dresses
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY.
The values are out of the ordinary even for this store- -and the reason is we
have too many nice cloth suits. They are stylish and the quality is right, or
wo would not have them.
At $12.95 you buy Suits that sold to $25.00.
At $13.75 you buy Silk Dresses, values to $30.00.
At $19.75 You buy Suits that sold to $35.00.
At $25.00 you buy Suits that sold up to $40,00.
Alterations on Suits Are Free.
Hosiery
"Last Forever"
A new guaranteed hose
for ladies and boys—every
pair guaranteed for four
weeks without mending.
We believe this to be
one of the best hose ever
made, and it is positively
the ONLY HOSE carrying
this guarantee, Try it for
yourself and the boys.
Price only 25.*.
Bartlett-Carver Co., solo
agents.
undoubtedly was.
Here the trust barons got in their
work, buying through their agents
direct from the farmers, and ship
ping the product of the fields and
ranges to their cold storage houses
at different strategic points in the
country, and thus holding up the
prices.
Get the young men Interested In
farming, Instruct the children,
arouse municipalities to the over
looked opportunities and the food
question will be solved.
Just Received Over 1000 Pairs of
SHOES
Davis Shoe Co.
Sole Agerts for Genuine Guaranteed Shoes.
114 Post St.
$8.50 Plumes for $5.35
$4.95 Plumes for $2.50
Underwear Sale
One special thing ahout
our underwear is that we
try to buy the best and
most serviceable in the
market and to so price it
that each sale adds an
other steady customer to
that department.
See our vests, 2 for. . .25#>
See our vests at 250
See our union suits at 35«*
Bee our union suits
at 91.00
See our union suits
at $1.75
If yon see them you'll
surely buy them.
For Friday and
Saturday.
ENGLISH WOMAN CHARGED
WITH INTIMIDATING VOTERS
(By United Pre»» Leased Wire)
LONDON, April 18.—The prose
out ion of Miss Charlotte Wilson of
Haxley on a charge of intimidating
voters at the last election, the
Gladstone league, an organization
formed to guard against franchise
manipulation, has set out to show
how the English masses' politics
are dictated to them by their so
cial and financial superiors.
WITH
Imperishable Soles
THE BEST THING OUT, FOR
WORK OR DREBB. NEW
SOLES SEWED ON ABSO
LUTELY FREE WHEN FIRST
ONES WEAR THROUGH.
Glove
Sale
A big line of "mark
downs" in all kinds and
qualities for Friday and
Saturday.
$1.73 kid gloves reduced
to $1.50
$1 .-5 kid gloves reduced
to $1.08
$1.25 long silk gloves re
duced to 98<
Fownes' double tipped
silk gloves, in two quali
ties, at 65f> and $1.25
MARTIN * EMERY CO.fJ
Stupendous Production *f
The Wild Fire Operatic Eenaatle*
Presented by a
COMPANY OF SIXTY
Including
Bert O. Swot as Con Kidder
Franker Woods as Kid Connor
and the
FAMOUS DUTCH KIDDIES
Prices, 25c. 60c, 75c. $1.00.
MATINEE TODAY AND TONIOHT
CLASS "A" TAT/88-mVU
Miss Flo Irwin
Aad Met Company tn
"Mrs. Peckham's Carouse"
m, jab at. ovujnr
"The Man Prom the West"
Songs and Stories, Vintage 1910
MOBUBISBY BUTHBI aad BBOS.
Singing and Dancing Diversion
men crrr Tmro
"IS Minutes of Musical Foolishness*'
WUHBK nOTSSM
Comedy Acrobats
ITHTL TOVHO
Novelty Vocalist
Comedy Tennis Racquet
Manipulators
MO?nt nonBM
OBFXEVK OICUITIi
Big-geat aad Beat la Tows
Vantages
A THE AT E. R
B. O. Walker, Mgr. Tel. SC. ISS3
Week Commencing- Sunday Matlaea
April 24th
3—PLTUTO TAMHUBM I
Wonderful Casting Acrobats
4—MUSICAL OATHS—«
Featuring Fred O. Cates
Playing the Largest Saxophone la
the World
THOS. KEOOH ana BUTX rKABTOIS
One-Act Comedy
•Tho War* Heeler"
TZS KABPEB-SMXTX THO
Singing, Talking and Dancing
hvelbt a> xtrmiorr
Comedy Talking Acrobats
Tn ■CBTTLT.raCHI
Rino and Pistol Experts
PABTTAOESOOra
Matin** dally, any seat ltc.
Evening-. 7:30 and 9: seats, lSe, Its
STARTING WITH MATINEE
TODAY—SUNDAY
ALL WEEK
The Incomparable D. S. Lawrence
Stock Company
With
Jane Vivian Kelton
THE HHR TO
THE HOORAH
Paul Armstrong's Best Play
The Typical Western Comedy
As Played by Guy Batea Post.
OUR PRICES—2Sc, 33c and 50c;
Sat. Mat., 25c and 50c;
Boxes and Divans, 75c.
NEXT WEEK, "ZAZA"
WASHINGTON
THEATER 11
MIOM CLASS TAVBHTZZiXJI
WMk Oessssssjsjtss? ■nadsy Matin**
April 34, 1910
"Special and Exclusive Vaudeville
Tour"
Th* World's Greatest Juggler
KAMA
Direct from the London Hippodrome
"Th* Piquant Artists"
SITfT BACOaT
Aad Oompany la
"Csborah'a Wedding Say**
Acrobatic Humor lata
X.OMO A FATaI
"Sleepy Sam and That Man 1 * ,
Tho Race Track Favorites
Tom IlTlun * WIUI Coriaas
"Mr. FUer vs. Miss Kidder"
The Celebrated Australian Bat Hot
Soloist"
■AMXZiTOsT IILL
In Distinctly Delightful Ditties
"Th* European Cartoonlat Who Puts
a Smile in Every Stroke"
BOUT KATABXtAY
Karatturia*
WAsxnroTOHscora
Matinee daily at 2:30.
Two showa every evening at T
and 9; price* 15c and ISo.

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