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East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, October 27, 1904, DAILY EVENING EDITION, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88086023/1904-10-27/ed-1/seq-3/

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DAILY
EAST OREOOXIAN, PENPLBTON, OREGON, THURSDAY,
OCTOBER ST, 1004.
PAGE THREE.
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FOR 21 MILES
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TO
I .. nt to meet
iTSi:.. -
rto nlake hlm .ee
((irr.ndplals'l0-
?A. Foera Co'
MftlMB"
NEW YORK'S GREAT
SUBWAY RAILROADS.
Mont Marvellous Engineering Achieve
ment of Modern Times -White
Enamelled Brick Walls Line the In
side Lights Make the Entire Tun
nel Bright aa Day Express Trains
Run a Mile a Minute Will Carry
11.1,000,000 Passengers a Year.
lrthdr the Be Beer
let!
lg purity yon desire.
Wnnd lo your home
imp call tor 0LYMPIA.
I NOLTE
Telephone Main 881.
Fortunes Made
in Real Estate
ltai ll no Investment that
pn u rood security and ln-
h In value ai rapidly aa
pi (Ute. K you would be
k nt your money In proper-
mil rowing city and see
Wi ban choice real eatate of
wrtptkMU In all deatrnhle
rln, both city and farm
FWtr, and rsnchea.
"wilt If you have nrnn.
p Hall; Hit It with u. Tf
i Ua to buy property, aee
twcelled fai-iui.. i. j
. ....us mi iiimiu-
V T5 A .4
"fcuavidsontS Co.
E. D. Boyd.)
Real Estate, and
""""M. no Court St.
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imp
pen BY THE mod.
1 1,5 method, soc.
!jUiorughly e(,upped
,1tlWera method, and
"kH1i "ar,,11" our
w "He highest atand.
jHaUrat-cia, work.
lite Bros.
DeaUsts.
-J Block.
e Main
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.BLVler.
New York, Oct. 27. The Rapid
Transit railroad, the subway, as It is
popularly known, and the most coins
sal undertaking of its kind in the
world's history, was formally opened
today with Imposing ceremonies. The
exercises took place under the Joint
auspices of the Interborough company
and the board of aldermen. In City
Hall park, where the great downtown
terminal is located and where the
first spadeful of earth was turned,
the principal ceremonies of the day
took place shortly before noon. The
park and city hall were lavishly dec
orated.
Bishop Potter opened the cere
monies with prayer and was followed
by an' address by Alexander E. Orr,
president of the Rapid Transit com
mission, who turned the subway over
to the city. Mayor McClellan accept
ed the trust, and then turned the road
over to August Belmont, president of
the Interborough company, who also
made a brief address. Archbishop
Farley closed the ceremonies.
At 1 o clock the first train was
sturted over the road, operated by
Mayor McCiellun In person. Bands
of music were stationed at all the
principal stops along the route. In
eluded among the passengers on the
first train were the city officials, of'
flcials of the Interborough "company,
a large party of distinguished engl
neers and other , Invited , guests.
Promptly at midnight tonight the
rond will be opened to the general
public. That part of the road that
will be operated for the present In
eludes the whole of the main line
from City Hall park to the Harlem
river on the upper west Bide, It Is
expected to huve the entire west side
opened to traffic within a month or
no, and nlso the east side branch to
the Bronx.
21 Miles Underground.
The great subway opened today
consists of 21 miles of railroad under
the city's teeming streets. The actual
work of construction hus taken just
four years and the cost exceeded
$50,000,000. When the entire system
Is completed It will enable one to
travel from the limits of Brooklyn to
the northernmost end of Manhattan
entirely underground.
A (lUKZling array of facts and fig
ures tell the story of the building of
the mammoth underground road.
For instance, more than 8,000,000 cu
bic yards of dirt nad rock were blast
ed and dug from the streets of the
crowded city. .To tear away the rock
1100.000 pounds of dynamite were
used. Eleven thousand men were
employed In the work and of this
number several hundred lost their
lives through accidents, premature
explosions, cave-ins and falling rock.
It is estimated that the road will
carry 115.000,000 passengers a year,
The fare Is 5 cents. When the exten
sion to Brooklyn, under the East river
has been completed it Is estimated
that the road will curry 200,000.000
passengers a year.
Express trntns will run through the
subway at the rate of a mile a min
ute for the benefit of the long hauls
from the Bronx to the busiest sec
tions of the city below Fourteenth
street. Local trains will stop at all
of the underground stations, every
half dozen blocks along the route
The tunnel Is ventilated by a system
of electric fans and illuminated the
entire route by Incandescent lights.
A trip through the great tunnel Is
all that Is necessary to- convince one
of Its entire security. White enameled
bricks wall up the aides to a bricked
nrch overhead. Everything else Is of
stotie and steel, and, heavy plate
Glass at the stations to let the light
in from the street overhead. It would
Mem impossible for a disaster to oc
cur when everything Is as new and
strong and perfect, apparently, as It
is within the power of man to con
trive. The pneumatic block system
Is pronounced by experts to be the
most wonderful thing of Its kind in
the world and It Is calculated to make
collisions Impossible.
The cars have steel bottoms, copper
sheathed sides, and there Is very little
wood In their construction. The light
ing system is entirely separate trom
the power plant that will move the
trains by means of the third rail.
The route of the main line Is up
fourth avenue to Forty-second street
'hen up Broadway until One Hun
dred nnd Fourth street Is reached
There It branches Into two sections.
The first continues straight out
Broadway to Kingsbrldge, a distance
of more than 14 miles from Battery
rK. The second section runs east.
tuning off a solid rock- corner of
-entral Park, then north through
Lennox avenue and on to the borough
"i the Bronx.
Meets In Springfield.
SnrlnpflatA til ...
in,, uul. -ilia cen
tral Illinois Homeopathic Society held
ts 22d annual meeting in Springfield
today, the sessions being held In the
L'l11,rin.A . . . ..
, tuun room or the stale cap
ital. The meeting was devoted en
t'rely to the bureau of medicine, of
which Dr. w. E. Nelberger of Bloom-
I'lgtOn. m KhaLm.. mw- -
. -,,ii,Hii, A 111? u cummin
of tuberculosis was one of the princi
pal matters-discussed.
Ladles
Teuuch'a,
Skirts lt.00 and up at
Grefflt cHiF Sal 1
in Many Departments.
Read every word of this ad. carefully, then act at once. You
can not pick up such rare bargains as these every day.
T' '
i
i
f ' '
Free
Furs
All
This
Week
s "
Free Shirt Waists
This week we give FREE, with skirts, a
fine, up-to-date shirtwaist.
With every $10.00 Skirt a $2.00 waist FREE
With every $0.00 Skirt a $1.75 waist FREE
With every $8.00 Skirt a $1.50 waist FREE
With every $7.00 Skirt a $1.25 waist FREE
With every $6.00 Skirt a $1.00 waist FREE
Alterations FREE.
With every suit or coat sold this week we
will give absolutely FREE, A FUR.
Read Carefully '
With every $35.60 suit or coat we give you
,-FREE any $7.60 fur in the house.
With every $30.00 suit or coat we give you
FREE any $5.00 fur in the house.
With every $25.00 suit or coat we give
FREE any $4.50 fur In the house.
With every $20.0 suit or coat we give
FREE any $4.00 fur in the house. And with
every suit or coat in the house worth down to
$12.60, we give ywu absolutely FREE, a fine
Fur.
If you desire a better fur than the one that
goes with your antit or coat, you can choose a
better one and pay the difference.
All alterations FREE.
OCTOBER SALE ON
Ladies Jackets
i Misses' Coats.
Ladies' $ 6.60 Jackets, this week .... $ 5.35
Ladies $10.00 Jackets, this week .... $ 7.R5
Ladles $12.50 Jackets, this week .... $10.00
Ladies' $13.60 Jackets, this week .... $11-24
Ladies' $15.00 Jackets, this week .... $12.25
Children's Coats.
Children's $3.00 Coats, this week $2.40
Children's $4.60 Coats, this week $.75
Children's $6.00 Coats, this week $4.00
Children's $6.60 Coats, this week $5.25
Children's $8.60 Coats, this week .i$S.75
Children's $9.60 Coats, this week 7JI5
Children's $12.00 Coats, this week $0.75
OCTOBER SALE OJT
Petticoats.
THE cgg? INCOMPARABLE
We have just received from the manufaC'
lurer in the East 160 dozen Ladles' Sateen Pet
ticoats In black and colors. All well made and
nicely trimmed with fancy ruffles.
Our price for this week:
$1.00, $1.2.-., $1.50, $1.75 and $2.00.
Regular price is fully 20 per cent more.
OCTOBER SALE OX
Dress Goods
and Waistings.
20 yards all wool waistings, with silk
Btrlpe. Pink, cream, tan and red. Octo
ber sale price 48c yd
$08 yards fancy all wool .waistings In red,
blue and tun. Regular price 50c. Sale
price 35c yd
150 yards all weol 56-inch goods, Just the
thing for skirts and suits, In gray,
brown, blue and green. Regular $1.60
and $1.26 value. October sale price 78c yd
600 yard fancy novelties in all colors. Blue,
brown, red and gray mixtures. Regular
price up to 85c yard. October sale price.
your choice of the lot, only 53c yd
OCTOBER SALE ON
Children's
Dresses.
We have the largest
line of children's
ready-to-wear dresses
shown In Pendleton,
and we are - selling
them so cheap It will
iiot pay you to buy the't
material and make
them.
NOTICE PRICES:
90c Dresses, October Sale 68c
$1.50 Dresses, October Sale .v.;; $1.15 '
$1.75 Dresses, October Sale . . $1.40
$2.00 Dresses, October-Sale $1.65
i,
$2.50 DresseB, October Sale $2.15
$2.75 Dresses, October Sale $1.05
$3.00 Dresses, October Sale $2.25
$3.60 Dresses,1' October Sale $2.75
$4.00 Dresses, October Sale . . . ! $3.20
$4.50 Dresses, October Sale , $3.50
The above come In red, blue and brown; -
ages 2 to 14 years.
Attractive Autumn Fashions in
Women's and
Misses' Sweaters.
The growing popularity of these neat and
attractive garments Is due to their practical
usefulness.
The $3.50 kind this week ,.. $2.05
The $5.00 kind this week $1.25
For misses and children we have them
down to $1.00.
vuiwa i - Yi
That
Give
Satis- iA-k
faction. Q
Shoes Repaired While You
wait, by an experienced shoemaker.
NII,-kJ) $3.60 shoe for women; 5 styles, t .
leathers? kid and patent kid. .
MAYFLOWER The best $3,0"b shoe made. '
Turn or welt. We guarantee every pair.
GREATEST $2.60 shoe for,, women. Good
wear or your money back. '
Try our $1.50 School Shoes. '
Lee Teutsch's Dept. Stre
MAIN AND ALTA STREETS
i
HIS IDEA.
Wwwwtwwj
Not Made by a Trust
1" OC ARE' REALLY LOOKING TOB IlPfN'e jc'tlOAa",'1
TRY THE "PEGGY O'NEAL." GUARANTEED BY THE LARGEST
INDEPENDENT MANUFACTURER 'IN THE 'tf. sf 6 BE ABSO-
LUTELY FULL HAVANA FI&LEnjAKD HAND-MADE.
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Man fro th. East Poor Smith's death must have been very sudden.
Alkali Ike Oh! no. The boys gave him time to say hit prayers.
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