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East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, January 01, 1917, DAILY EVENING EDITION, Image 4

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PACE FOUR
DAILY EAST OREGONIAN. PENDLETON. OREGON. MONDAY, JANUARY 1. 1917.
EIGHT PAGES
)
N IMH.IKM'K.M M-S'A1EB
'obiWiMl IwIIt and Semi W'kly t I'm
tin-ton. rsn. hT th
suet oui:i,(ima. ri iu.imiisg co
City Official Tappr.
Tounty Officlnl Fpr.
Membw United press
Association.
Knteret) it th pnarofflre at rndleton,
Drtgun, a oond class "jail matter.
ON 8AI.K IN OTIIKR CITIES
Imperial Hll Newt Stand. Portland,
Bavioaa Co., I'nnlaud. Oregon.
ON KILE AT
CMraeo Bureau, Se,nrlty BulKlIn.
Waaiiinirton. l C, Bureau, 501 Four
tactn Sirtrt, N. ff.
lapbooe 1
BCBSrRIPTMS RATES.
(IN ADVANCE)
Pally, one year, by rtVn
11)1, all montha. by mall
llly, three montha, by mlL-....
'Mllf, on month, by mall
)ally, one year, by carrier
...V00
2 50
::x
7 ,V
.- 175
ally, alt montha. By carrier .
ally, three montha, by carrier 1 Wl
ally, one month, by carrier ,6S
ami Weekly, one year, by mall 1.R0
ml-Weekiy, all montha. by mail .75
ami Weekly, tour months, by mall .60
A WOMAN'S PRAY EH,
God, make me worthy of
the
little things;
The thin, new moon, the lit-
tie bird that sings,
The whimsy dream with ever.
ready wings
God make me worthy of the lit-
tie things.
?
Lord, let me feel the glory of the
mall:
The hidden path, the bud.
the
treeze'a call.
Those little hours that have no
spur at all
Lord, let me feel the glory of
the small.
God, make me worthy of the
little things:
The little silences that loving
bring;,
The routine task, the little band
that clings
God make me worthy of the lit-
tie things!
Glad Madone in Ainslee's
SERVI CABLE EDUCATORS
BR. SUZZALLO, president
of the University of
Washington, has set peo
ple talking by a spirited ad
dress made before the state
teachers association in Port
land. He is an educator of the
new school, with little patience
for some of the old notions:
"Education such as we have
bad dealt largely with history
and civics and other similar
subjects," he said, "mental
processes. Now in the voca
tional field we have technical
processes. These institutions
have existed for centuries as
differentiations. Now the
problem is to weld them to
gether. "The task befoie us is the
reinterpreting of a liberal ed
ucation in the language of a
culture of today."
The function of the school is
aot merely to equip the stu
dent with knowledge but to
fchow him how to utilize his
equipment in the practical pur
poses of life. As Samuel
Elythe says, the only wisdom
that is really worth while is
the wisdom that brings home
the bacon.
While there is still much to
criticise with reference to
school work it is encouraging
to know that present methods
are incomparably better than
the old.
a
A SERIOUS CASE
1i N his communication today
Jl relating to the president!
al vote Mr. White, prin
cipal of the Washington school
in Pendleton and formerly one
of the county school supervis
ors, makes a rather startling
admission regarding "Those
of us who feel that fne election
of this year betrays an element
of national weakness, that the
choice of Mr. Wilson over a
man of the sterling character,
Fplendid poise and faultless
record of Mr. Hughes brings
into some question the wisdom
of the policy of universal suf
frage." The tragedy of November 7
was serious indeed for this
rentleman. There are numer
ous things that might be said
for the benefit of Mr. White
but this being the cheerful
season of the year the East
Oregonian will hope for him
that he will not feel too bad
too long and that as he grows
up he will acquire a greater
breadth of view than he now
possesses.
THE PEOPLE MAKE
. TOWN
THE
t ENDLETON has been dis
J tinctly prosperous and
progressive durine 1916.
We have witnessed a whole
some advancement in our com
mercial and industrial affairs.
Many new homes have been
erected and the city's popula
tion has made a pronounced
though conservative growth.
Fdr the most past our people
are in good rircumstaiio
Producers have had Dhenomi-
nal prices, labor has been well
employed and the merchandise
business has reflected the gen
eral leeling of bouyancy.
Natural conditions have con
tributed strongly to the optimi
stic local situation. Yet the
human equation is not to be
overlooked. Our people are
awake as to good methods,
they know the drawing power
of faithful and courteous ser
vice and the truth in the prin
ciple that the best fruits of the
world are always for those who
work for them with strength
and aggressiveness.
Pendleton people are in no
small degree responsible for
this city's prestige and pros
perity. They are directly re
sponsible for many valuable
steps taken in the direction of
civic improvement. More than
one local betterment or indus
try is here because our people
have worked together for the
city's good. In all parts of the
state we have acquired a repu
tation for pulling together for
Pendleton. Let that reputa
tion be sustained during 1917.
IN PEACE AS WELL AS
WAR
3F the liquor traffic is an
evil in wartime it must
11 11 A
ionow inai u is an evil in
peace, says the spokesman
Review. A traffic that impairs
a country's fighting efficiency
will also impair its industrial
effficiency when that country is
at peace.
All the great warring powers
have now branded the liquor
traffic as a demoralizing influ
ence on national character and
efficiency. Russia has forbid
den the sale of vodka, Germany
has restricted the manufacture
of beer, France has prohibited
the use of strong liquors, and
now Lloyd George is preparing
to take over the liquor business
nationally in order to limit and
restrict alcoholic consumption.
A drunken nation can not
win in battle, and to the ex
tent that drunkenness is im
pairing the efficiency of Brit
ish workmen it is impairing
England's chance of winning
the war. The traffic handi
caps the British in another
way. It consumes industry in
its own production, and adds
to the congestion of traffic on
the railroads.
If from the plain lessons of
the war, the fighting nations
could now negotiate a peace
that contained a compact to
prohibit the manufacture and
sale of liquor in all their do
mains, and would hold to it,
that lesson, if it could have
been had in no other way,
would be worth all and more
that the war has cost.
FROM THE PEOPLE
THE WiLtiOX-IU'ClIES VOTE.
Pendleton, Ore., Jan. l.
Kditor Kast Oregonlan:
I am craving permission to use a
little of your space to make come
comments concerning your editorial
in Thursday's tasue as to the presi
dential vote of 1910. I think that a
little reflection will reveal to you
that the whole tone of that article
is unfair and that much of it is mis
leading. First, let us consider your state
ment about the states "carried into
the democratic column." Whit did
West Virginia, Indiana, Illinois, Mich
igan, Wisconsin, Minnesota and South
Dakota become "North Atlantic or
New England states?"
Second, as to the heavy vote. He
(Wilson) did get a large aggregate
vote as compared with other years be
cause our voting population has
grown tremendously, but hU percent
age of the vote was very small for
a winner. Have you noticed that Mr.
Hughes received a far heavier vote
than was ever given to a presidential
candidate before 191 S? Compare his
vote with that of recent successful
candidates. His vote Is nearly a mil
lion and a half greater than McKin
ley received in 189t, more than a mil
lion and a quarter greater than Room-
nveived in the avalanche f
lih4. nine hundred thousand sreatec
than Tift received in lm$ and two
and a Quarter million greater than
Wilson reeeivid ill 1S12. in view of
these figures, all of which will he
subsiamiatoii by the World Almanac,
Mr. Wilson's vote looks much le.
imposing It is the percentage of
the vote that affords the best index i
of a candidate's popularity. Mr. yl!-
son is the only president elected in j
twenty ears. to receive les than half i
of the total vote oast, i. e., to have I
fewer votes cast for him than were '
cast for other candidates in the aff- j
gregate for the fame position. I
Ignoring fractions, the following is ;
the record: I
In 1S96, Mr. McKinley received 51 i
per cent of the total vote. In 1900 '
trie same 51 per cent. In 1904, Mr.
Roosevelt received 58 per cent, in
1908 Mr. Tuft 51 per cent' and in
1912 but that was Mr. Wilson again
In that year he fared even worse than
this. In 1916 he received 43 per cent 1
To those of us who feel that the
election of this year betrays an ele
ment of national weakness, that the
choice of Mr. Wilson over a man of
sterling character, splendid poise and
faultless record of Mr. Hughes, brings
Into some question the wisdom of the
policy of universal suffrage, the an
alysis of the vote affords some com
i
fort. This comfort lies first in the
per centage of the voters who favored
the winner 48 and second In a
study of the composition of that 48
per cent. If the eleven states that
once seceded be excluded, Mr. Hughes'
margin over Mr. Wilson is almost
three hundred thousand votes. Per-f
haps you ask why exclude them? Are !
they not now a part of the union and
entitled to a voice? Certainly, but It
is a well known fact that their vote is i
still determined by issues growing out
of the civil war, that in a national
election they never consider either the I
IS.-U6
or the candidate. In seven of
them and without these seven Mr.
Hughee. has a lead of 100,000, no
campaign is ever made and their votes
are conceded and wrapped away in I
advance. No candidate so unworthy
could be nominated and no platform
so ridiculous adopted by the demo,
cratic convention, as to throw the
slightest doubt on their vote. And of 1
course, any doubt that might attach
to the remaining four, Virginia, Ten.
nessee, North Carolina, and Arkan
sas, Is very faint Indeed. So there
is consolation in knowing that In the
states where Issues are weighed and
candidates considered. Mr. Hughes
has an appreciable margin over Mr.
Wilson, and that though the latter
was greatly favored by the European
war, giving him the benefit of the
contentment that arose from the great
impetus which it gave to our industry,
and closing the eyes of many voters
to questions of the greatest moment,
yet he will remain as he has been, a
minority president this time with
48 per cent of the vote cast.
Respectfully,
ALBERT E. WHITE.
Cluimberlain's Conch Remedy
Most
Effectual.
"I have taken a great many bottles
of Chamberlain's Cough Remedy and
every time it has cured me. I have
found it most effectual for a hacking
cough and for colds. After taking It
a cough always disappears," writes
J. R. Moore, Lost Valley, Ga. Ob.
tainable everywhere. Adv.
it
VV r i f" CI M IV ill tov QCM7 ! V K.W
Wfif'
111 Jl J (Iv KpMJUf 8 a "PPin2' realistic story. An expose of the t
ii 1 1 E&1 8ccrct nt"uc anc I;'nsecn dangers from the spict
, , I , !M and intriguers of foreign nations.' .
WW MOB
""N "'V n
inl I r inl tiff
I 1 LI fill I i f 1 1 MM i 1.1 M I
8 REEL
TUES. and
s
"'V i i ,y
PEGGY HYLAND and
In
it
ROSE OF THE. SOUTH"
PAST1MK
(From the Daily East
Oresonian,
Jan. 1, 1889.)
Iast night was the coldest of the
season, yet not so frigid as to distress
the most cold blooded.
James Lehman was down from
Teel springs today to spend a day or
so among Pendleton friends.
R. Alexander, D. D. G. R, will leave
Wednesday accompanied
by E. E.
Sharon, D. D. G. M to Install the new.
ly elected officers of Lillian encamp
ment I O. O. F. at Centerville.
Joseph Robinson, long years ago a
resident of Weston but now a ranch
er in the Lexington country, was in
town. He is the father of J. F, Rob
inson of Pendleton.
Tom Lacefield who is In town to
day from his ranch, contemplates
starting a tannery on his farm.
A little candy stand has been start
ed by the librarian Mr. Earl in the
library rooms.
j Professors M. G. Royal and W. L,
German of Pendleton returned on
Saturday evening's train from Milton
where they had been in attendance at
the teacher's Institute.
Tonight a New Year's hop will be
given at the Frazer opera house. Sup
per will be served at the Vlllard
House restaurant.
GOFS TO GRAVE WITH INDIAN
ARROW POINT IN HIS BODY
Californian. Dead at 01. Carried Mis
I sle That Struck Him 55
j Years Ago.
LOS ANGELES, Cal., Jan. 1 In a
fight with thieving Plutes near Inde
pendence fifty-five years ago, Allen
Connelly Van Fleet was shot in the
side with an arrow, which ranged
from right to left across his back,
barely missing the spinal column.
That Indian died with the twang of
the bowstring in his ears, for the
wounded man quickly and carefully
put a bullet through his heart.
cp nn rp
J Lulls
1 ft tj
28 Years Ago Today
,51 i
PROGRAM
ID. Jl.
a.-.nr ,- V-Mllht-taaWnanii-Mf-lila i'r -j- n-r - i . --AT
ANTONIO MORENO
TODAY,
Then Van Fleet undertook to pull
the missile out of his own body. The
wooden shaft came, but the obsidian
point, three inches long, slender and
sharp, stuck. Through the half cen
tury and more it has remained.
A few days ago it was laid in the
grave with Van Fleet, who passed
away at his ranch home eight miles
east of Bishop. He would not permit
its removal during life, and It will
stay with him In death. Van Fleet
was ninety one, and death was due to
his years.
a mo stage,
For Adams, Athena and Weston
eaves Hennlng's Cigar Store at 10 a
u. and I: SO p. m. each day. Adv.
DALE HOT U WELL
Optometrist and Optician
Glasses ground
and fitted. Lenses
duplicated.
American National Bank Building,
Pendleton.
EXPERT REPAIRING
of Watches
and Jeweliy
SATISFACTION GUUiEED
THE Jeweler
OT
mzrkgjr Jots,
Serial hm&Jkip$&
JAmerkai Secretin
OAIPH KEUARO7
MARIE WAYNE o
moooatmwi
2nd id 3rd
iiAtn
cal Eft
i
ran
THIS DAY COMMENCING ITS 11TH YEAR IN
THE PICTURE BUSINESS IN PENDLETON
Wishes a
Happy PJew Year
to AH
FEELING THE PULSE OF THE PEOPLE
Just as the doctor watches his patient, so does the
Pastime watch the trend of public opinion on pic
tures. That is why you never tire of Pastime programs.
The wants, the likes and the dislikes of Pastime
patrons are carefully weighed and analyzed. Photo
plays are selected with the aim ever prominent to
present a diversity of entertainment.
When you think it over, you will easily realize
why you always have a thirst for Pastime diversion.
Each time you slip into a Pastime chair an effort is
being made to meet your mood. If a comedy romance
is needed to drive the chill out of your heart, it
blooms for you on the Pastime screen. If it is a
high-pitched drama that is necessary to quiet a
craving for excitement, that is also there when you
want it.
It isn't the same old thing over again. Each time
you enter the Pastime you step into an animated land
that is new and refreshing.
The Pastime reads your entertainment pulse.
That is the secret of Pastime pre-eminence.
BELOW IS A PARTIAL LIST OF PASTIME
STARS FOR 1917. THESE LEADERS IN FILM
LAND CAN ONLY BE SEEN AT THE PASTIME.
Mary Pick ford Artcraft Pictures Corpn.
Charlie Chaplin Mutual Film Corpn.
Theda Bara Fox Film Corpn.
Anita Stewart Greater Vitagraph Co.
Margarette Fiacher Mutual Film Corpn.
Valeska Suratt Fox Film Corpn.
Mary Mile Minter Mutual Film Corpn.
June Caprice Fox Film Corpn.
Peggy Hyland Greater Vitagraph Co.
William Farnum Fox Film Corpn.
William Russell Mutual Film Corpn.
Richard Bennett Mutual Film Corpn.
Virginia Pearson Fox Film Corpn.
Dustin Farnum Fox Film Corpn.
Florence Turner Mutual Film Corpn.
Nance O'Neil Mutual Film Corpn.
Lucille Lee Stewart Greater Vitagraph Co.
George Walsh Fox Film Corpn.
Stuart Holmes Fox Film Corpn.
Baby Jane Lee Fox Film Corpn.
Gladys Brockwell Fox Film Corpn.
Helen Holmes Mutual Film Corpn.
Lillian Walker Greater Vitagraph Co.
Anna Little Mutual Film Corpn.
Frank Borzage Mutual Film Corpn.
Earl Williams Greater Vitagraph Co.
Harry T. Morey Greater Vitagraph Co.
Alice Joyce Greater Vitagraph Co.
E. H. Southern Greater Vitagraph Co.
Gertrude McCoy Mutual Film Corpn.
Art Acord Fox Film Corpn.
Marjorfe Rambeau Mutual Film Corpn.
Arline Pretty Greater Vitagraph Co.
Julia S. Gordon Greater Vitagraph Co.
Dots"5 Kelly Greater Vitagraph Co.
Mary Anderson Greater Vitagraph Co.
Bobby Connelly Greater Vitagraph Co.
Gretchen Hartman Fox Film Corpn.
Gladys Coburn Fox Film Corpn.
Antonio Moreno Greater Vitagraph Co.
Marc McDerrnott Greater Vitagraph Co.
Edith Storey Greater Vitagraph Co.
Claire Whitney
Gis Heaters
from $3.00 up
Once used you wonder how you ever got
along without it
Pacific Pom & Light Company
PHONE 40
HE
1
Fox Film Corpn.
Your Bath Room Warm and
Comfy With One of Our

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