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East Oregonian : E.O. (Pendleton, OR) 1888-current, July 27, 1918, DAILY EVENING EDITION, Image 1

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DAILY EVENING EDITION . . ',f,0? h
i jj Esr v r ;Hra-
COUNTY OFFICIAL PAPER r "T .QP Ti
DAILY EVECniCITI":
WKATHF H FOriFCAST.
ToniBht and Saturday gmsrally
cloudy. ' .
COUNTY OFFICIAL PAPER
NO. 9496
VOL.80
DAILY EAST OKEGONIAN, PENDLETON, OREGON, SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1918
WAR'S MOST
FIRE
FOE
RA'VX)N
: . . - ' '
TERRIFIC
SALIENT IS
TARGET OF
HURRICANE
BY ALLIES
400,000 Struggling Germans
and Fere - cn - Tardenois
Centers of Storm.
HUNDREDS THOUSANDS
SHELLS REPEL ENEMY
Objective Almost Within
Grasp; Big Aisne Bridge
Useless.
PARIS, July 27. Franco
American artillery is sub
jecting the entire Soissons
Rheims salient containing
-400,000 struggling Germans
to the most terrific bom
bardment of the war.
Hundreds of thousands of
shells of all calibres are be
ing hurled upon the troop
concentrations, ammunition
supply depots and communi
cation lines from the battle
front to the rearmost areas.
The deluge directed particu
larly at Fere-en-Tardenois
the most important concen
tration center now almost
within the Allies' grasp.
Misey - sur - Aisne, five
miles east of Soissons, is un
der heavy bombardment
rendering practically useless
the big Aisne bridge there.
AUSTRIAN SOCIALISTS ;
DEMAND IMMEDIATE
PEACE PREPARATIONS
COPENHAGEN, July 27. A soci
alist member of the Austrian parlia
ment addressing: a communication to
the Austrian ministry declared an
early peace "absolutely essential to the
life of Austro-Hunimry, KulKaris? and
Turkey," says a dispatch from Vienna.
It asked whether the ministry was
ready to negotiate with Germany re
garding war alms and It demanded Im
mediate preparation for peace negoti
ations. , '
Italians to Use U. S.
"Eagles" in Adriatic
WASFFINOTOX, July 27- Italy Is
to use the new American type of sub
marine chasers, the "KaKle" boats. In
Its campniKn of attrition offninst the
Austrian fleet In tho Adriatic sea.
Announcement was made today that
the Italian government has completed
negotiations for taking over from the
r.avy dppartment a contract for 12 or
the He vessels, and Italian officers said
they regarded this as only the fore
runner of orders for a large number
of craft.
iti ss
:xi:hai not command.
IXti.
German
General,
ixixnoN. July 27. The
rrixirt that Iho ItumMan
(iourko, nun atMOTintcd cnnimnudi'r in
rhicf of the Allied forrfs in tin- Mnr
mnn district is officially dcnli-d.
I
FIRST TRY LANDS FAMOUS FOE
(FRANK J. TATIXtt )
WITH THK AMKRICAXS IX
FRANVK. July 27 Lieutenant Wal
ter Avery of Columbus, Ohio, In his
first air battle brought down (aptnln
Slendkopf, noted German aviator,
rp-'. of ffcatw Thierry,
y- They nct while each wag patroll-
inh n. fi.r J minutes Alendkopr
made a futile attempt to gain advan-;of
HERE'S YANK WHO
BAGGED 159 HUNS
Sergt J. F. Brown became separ
ated from his regiment In the fight
near Chateau Thierry. When he re
joined it he was inmhinff Herman
soldier ahead of him with his bayo
net. Part of them he captured in a
trench and the rest he picked upon
the way In. "I'm sorry I was tinahie
to brinjr in all I had." he reported to
his commander, "but four of them
v.ere wounded and died." The photo
In of Herat- J. F- Hrown of Warren.
"
f
Ir- i
O., who is believed to have been the , crown prince's army, tliough depresfl
man who did it. . , ...
HINDENBURG DECLINES
TO ACCEPT BLAME IN
FAVORVONLUDEKDORFF
LONDON. July 27. Zurich die
patches say Hfndpnbnrj? is strongly
opposed t the offensive plan, now
insisting " thnt Lndendorff accept all
the blame. HlndenlHirg interviewed,
aaid: "In war nothing- avenjrea Itself
like overhaste. Hnathlng t-paces in
battles are necessary.
Stanfield Woman
Loses Wardrobe by
Mistake in Trunk
PORT TOWXSRXD, July 27.
Mrs. Sydney It. Archer of Stanfield,
Or., wife of a soldier stationed a
Fort Worden, has lost her entire
wardrobe and other valuables worth
$400, contained 1 na trunk checked
from her home in this city, accord
ing to her husband's statement today.
Kit her by mistake or intent her
checks were changed and Instead of
Retting- her trunk she received a box
belonging to someone else.
THIRTY-TWO GERMAN
PLANES ARE DOWNED
LODON July 2T. The air minis
try todav reported that IlrltKh alr-j
men felled 31 Oermnn airplane and J
one observation balbthn July 2T, while;
the anti-aircrafters shot down -one.
plane. Fifteen Ilritishers wrro lost, j
Extensive bombing operations were
carried out.
A certain amottnt .if work in con
junction with the artillery was done
!ond many rcoonnolsnnoes accomplish-
el and the umittl bombing: carried
out. Among targets attacked were
three lnrpe ammunition dumps, the
.Bruges docks unii numerous villages
used bs billets by enemy t roups.
A strong west wind great I v favor
ed the enemy ' in airf ighting-'
tage by trick.' Then Avery gnt on
the Gormnn's mil. danmBing the plane
so that it was forced to land within
the Anicrlr;in lines.
Memlkopf was enraged when he
Irnrned it wiim Averya first fliKht. II1
sulked and refused to titlk. Meu.iknpf
is credited with 16 victims.
lie is
one ot six uernians to wear tne wtoss
Merit. 1
CRISIS OF
BATTLE IS
NOWIAR
-
Experts Believe No Army
Can Long Withstand
Hammering Being Dealt !
GERMAN RESISTANCE
GROWING DESPERATE
Heaviest Pressure Exerted
on All Sides Soissons
Rheims Pocket.
JMKnnX, July 27 The ctIkIh of
the roltiHKal SolKsoiig-Hlicimfi battle Ik
exported hourly. Rxik-tIn licllcve no
army can long withstand the artillery
hall anil constant hammering the Ger
mans are reeelvlnar. Willie pressure
Is the heaviest on all sides, only slight
local gains are resulting owing to des
perate German resistance.
ADVANCE ItEPOItTKD.
T1m communique merely reported a
French advance north of Porl-a-IIIn-son
and local iorntIons In Cham.
liagne.
Tin voluntary retirement of tfic
tug to me (.crowns, wouiq. nave
hroii "lit iH'actirolly no (rutcglc rc
miiUm, but the decision to figlit It out
brought a most bitter and fur-reaeh-liiS
test of baule.
U. S. TAX AFTER WAR
INSIGNIFICANT WHEN
FOE'S IS CONSIDERED
WASHINGTON. July . 27 United
States taxpayers must prepare to pro
vide about $2,000,000,000 In revenue
annually when pence comes. The
treasury department declared expen
ditures will be double the pre-war ex
penses. But when compared with Germany's
financial obligations after the war this
country 'will sink Into Insignificance,
The German public debt now exceeds
$30,000,000,000. German taxes yearly
will be about Sn.no0.000.000 although
earning power Is Impaired.
ritlC.VE HAS FAMIXK TUOTS
Zl HH'II, July 27. The Arhcltcr
Zcituiig flcvlnrctf riniis disorders
have iH-okcit out in fratic as a rvsiiit
of fumino. They liu,vo Iind no bread
sine July 7.
I"-Ilont Visits Agulii.
WASHINGTON. July 27. AmeH-
can naval craft toduv apiwrently hart
a hruli with a X-ImmiI off tho con.
I acYxtrriimr to navy department mos.
! suges. The deiwrtnient said tho I'
f bout menace still exist;.
ON TO
Thin, you'll notice, i a new Idea
near the Cormnni are to Paris, it fh
J KSil
! l" '
nn: it s a long vrav to Potsdam palace,
direction, and they'll get there!
Commander of Cruiser
Sunk Off Long Island
I r, ' ;4 g
I r- , . y
' ' j
K " i
- mm -.. :
CART, H, M. CHRISTY
Captain HH. Christy was the
commander of the United States
cruiser Fan Diego, which was sunk off
Fire Island, Long Island, X. Y. He
Rave it as his opinion in his report
to the navy department that he had
been sunk by the torpedo of a sub
marine. .That opinion was to some
extent confirmed by the later appear
ance of a German U-boat . off the
Massachusetts shore two days later.
AMERICANS PAID
IN ENEMY PRISON
WASHINGTON, June 27. Ameri
can army officers and men. under a
present ruling of Comptroller War
wick of the treasury, are entitled to
full pay and all allowances while held
prisoners of war by the enemy. Mem
bers of the nurse corps, field clerks
and othr ari-iy eiAioj-es do not come
within the ruling.
PENDLETON PIONEER
BUSINESS MAN DIES
AT PORTLAND; CANCER
James M. Leezer, a well pioneer
business man of Pendleton, died at
Portland yesterday morning after a
seven months illness with cancer. Mr.
Leezer had made his home at Port
land since 1902, having moved to that
place from Pendleton, and waa 11
years of age.
Deceases came vo Oregon via Cape
Horn In 1S52. locating first at Port
land. From there he moved to X'ma
tilla in 1864 where he conducted a
hardware store and tin shop. In
1880 he came to Pendleton and en
gaged In the pa me business, being lo
cated on Court street where Clark's
hardware store now is. In 188" he
disposed of this business and for a
short time engaged In farming at
Meadows, near Kcho. where he owned
a lot of land. In 1R88 he returned to
Pendleton and went into the drug
business on Court street where the
Koeppen's drug store now 1 located.'
In 1902 he moved to Portland where
he engaged in the real estate business
and which placet has since teen his.
home.
He
I
is survived by two daughters, j
Mrs. V. P. Johes and Miss Iteatric?
Leezer. The funeral will be tinier-
i row at 2 p- m- at Pelwood crematory
!ln Portland. Mrs. X. R. Martin, a
; granddaughter, left Pendleton today
Uo attend the funeral.
BERLIN!
in w
ar ntp. In.-t
how nej r the
but our boys
end of tfhwne how
own
Yanks are to Ber
are moving in Its
UHtlilUlflir r
OF STRIKE k
IS BROKEN r) 0
: - u i
Munitions Workers Return
ing; as Result of Conscrip
tion Threat.
COVENTRY SITUATION
REMAINS UNSETTLED
Only 200,000 Estimated Now
Out; Grave Crisis
Relieved.
LONDON, July 274 Munition
workers are returning to work. The
strikes backbone seems broken by the
governments threat 'to enforce con
scription on the strikers.
In Birmingham especially many
have returned to work. The govern
ment estimates only 200,000 still out
with the number steadily diminish
ing. In Coventry the situation was
uot changed by Lloyd George's ulti
matum. The strikers Jeered at the
threat of enforced army service after
Monday. Twenty thousand are still
idle there. Morning newspapers gen
erally endorse the ultimatum. The
Times said : "The strike Is
bold
defiance of government and a large
majority of people will support the
ultimatum-
Feopio lir-hlitd Government.
The Graphic said the government's
action would cause immense relief
throughout the nation.
The Chronicle said. "Stern" meas
ures must be expected."
The telegraph asked, "What would
happen to us if the men in the trench?
es struck whenever they have a griev
ance? Munition workers must stom
ach their troubles."
The News called Lloyd-George's de
cision the gravest in the history of
English industrial strife.
Coventry Strikers Still Out.
LONDON, July 27. Striking muni
tion workers in a mass meeting in
Coventry adopted resolutions sayin?
they would not return to work until
the embargo on skilled labor is re
moved. This creates a final issue
with the government which promises
to place the strikers in the army
Monday.
MORE BRITISH RAID
SUCCESS REPORTED
LONDON, July 27. Successful
raids and artillery activity in Ficardy
and Flanders sectors are reported by
Ha Iff-
TRAIN LOAD OF LAMBS
HIT PEAK OF MARKET
Last week Dan P. Smvthe delivered
in the Chicago market a truln load
of lambs which brought 18 1-2 cents
pound. They averaged 8') pounds
and the shipment numbered 5300
head.
The price paid was the peak of the
high market of last wek and was
more than $TS 000. The Chicago
market Is off $1 a hundred on the
price of last week, showing that Mr.
Smythe was particularly fortunate in
catching it at the time he did.
The sheep sale created a sensation
Ir the Chicago sheep trade is It was
said to he the best lot on Xs market
i in a long time.
I1UIJSIFVIKI TOIITI IM-: I.KIt.MA
AMsTKItH AM. .Inly 27. llil.-.lie Iki
sidflicrs raptuiH'ft. mi.trrml and then
'sht tv.n (;.man licutciiHiit atiatmx
flying over lliissian ttrltory. Ger
many has demainlNl tlic sever-!
liuiiislimciit.
THE WAR. JULY 27
I DURING 4 YEARS
July 27, 1917: Itussiane t
portotl to be evacuating t'lernn
witz. Ormans start new at
tack in t'hampiixnc.
July 27, 1916: Pritih take
Pel villi ivood. iviifvsians chase
Turks in Caucasus.
July 27, 1SK.: lrand Puke
N"ich(das" army holds Crmans
before Warsaw. French take
offensive in Alace.
J uly 2 7. 1 ll 4 : Austrian in
vade Srhm. Kn eland pro p ('
international pcae Cimferetice.
1 1 1 v and Fra n ee a e reel n g. hut
Wtlhelm of iter many starts
talking about his goo1 tier man
word, and refuses to confer.
aa4
SCORNS SAFE JOB
TO GET ACTION
CORPL H.L.. HVLBERT.
Corporal Henry Lewis Hulbert. 50.
and a marine gunner, was recently
cited for bravery at Chateau Thierry,
I 'la-v,ns constantly exposed Himself
n me enemy a nre witnout regard
to personal danger, thereby assuring
tieliver.J of supplies." '
He was Offered a position In the
war office but threw it up 1 1 get in
to action. jf -
Hulbert won the medal of honor
for bravery In action at Samoa. April
1. 1899. He first enlisted In the ma
rines In J89S- He Is a native of Hull.
England. In his 20 years of service
for the stars and stripes there Is not
one blot.
COLORED DRAFTEES
HONORED BY FRIENDS
Pendleton colored colony last even
ing gave a patriotic social and pro
gram for the colored draftees who are
to leave soon to join the colored reg
iment being formed at Camp Lewis.
The affair last night was held at the
home of Pn Hickman, on Cosbiw
street and was attended by 37 .local
colored folk. Th evening was Bpent
with a social time and ' curing the
same talks were made encouraging
the draftees In the work that the
are to do and promising that the home
"fires "will be kept burning. An aux
iliary was formed for the purpose of
keeping in touch with the men after
they have reft Pendleton-
Those honored last night included
the five local men who are to leave
August 1 and two railroad men who
have their homes here but who are
registered at Spokane. They are ,
Charles M- Johnson, Spokane, George'
Fletcher, Albert Williams. Howard O
OriKgs. Oeorge Odburn Victor
Hooker and Ieo Pierce, Spokane.
Two more local boys, of ape since
the first registration, will leave this
fall.
GERMAN CAPTAIN
DECLARES PRESENT
BATTLE DECISIVE
AMSTKKPAM. July 27. Writing in
the Vosirht Z'itun. Captain Kallmann
det la red "t he present battle must be
decisive. The lesult will depend Umi
bo has the vr-at"st rosores .readv
at the place where they are most
needed. It would be against our in
terests to ht the war draft through
the -winter until the Americans arrive
enn.asse m Franco."
Kos AXCKI.KS. July ;7. Oovernot
Stephens to.I.w granted a stay of ex
ec;: tit n of Thomas Mooney's death
svnteiu-e f'r preparedness parade dy
namitinic until pvcembr 13 next, say
im; it weuid require that time to study
tbe case. He pr.nisl a square dat.
Stephen said: " I ha-e decide! to
jtukc this actum so all persons la th
JUSTICE
ASSURED
AMERICAN'
FIGHTERS
ARE Iv'OW
1 ITALY
March Makes Statements on
U. S. Army; Yanks hold
64-74 Mile Front.
ENEMY NO NEARER TO
PARIS THAN 49 MILES
; 53,000 Troops," Supplies and
Equipment Reach France
' This Week.
t t i r
WASHINGTON", July 27.Oenrl
March told the correspondents that
American fighting forces have arriv
ed In Italy from France. He announc
ed the formation of the fourth and
fifth army corps in France and aald
the allies' lines In the present offen
sive reached from 6 i to 74 miles.
Ftae Further from Paris.
The Germans formerly were t
miles from Paris and are now 49 at
the nearest point. -
March said only 53,040 Americans
landed In France last week, which
was 40,000 less than previously be
cause of the- sendinir rf tieedtd sup
plies and equipment
British Make Fine Stride. '
He said Eplds was taken and re
taken four times and now in the Am
ericans' hands with their advance only
temporarily delayed. He said the
British made a most dashing- attack
against the German left flank saining "
a mile and a half on a four mile) front
making- a pocket endangering- enemy ,
territory now occupied by the a 1 Ilea
greater than what the Germans cap '
tured In Flanders this spring. The '
American lines are now within three -and
one half miles of Fere-en-Tarden. '
ois, which Is csonstantly shelled.
Ilpinforcemeiits from France
March said that during Che last
few days American combatant forces
have begun arriving in Italy but num
bers and assignments have not been
cabled. All went from France, sup
plementing the non-combatants at-
ready there. He said many local at
tacks hae been made by the Ger
mans against the Americans at Grt-
sulles and Kpleds. Precipttlous wood
ed country on the Marne made pro
gress difficult. ' .'
RAIN SLOWS FIGHT
BUT HINDERS HUNS
(FRED FEROt'SOX)
"WITH THE AMERICANS IV
' FRANCE, July 27. Heavy Rain in
'the entire Marne renlon have slowed:
Idown the operations but have render
ed the Germans' positions increasinari
; difficult. The enemy now is depenJ
i in largely upon his maneuvering
ability. Thus the rain adds to tha
difficulty created by artillery and the
narrow salient.
(FRED FKRt-.l'SON)
j The allies are a?so hampered by to
day's rain but their communications
have not been out so badlv as tho
enemy's. The number of prisoners
and machine suns captured U steadily,
mounting.
ITALIANS VKTOIIIOVS.
KOMK. July 27 The war office -day
aniMMiiK-etl that the Italians nV
fcatM rofHaiext rmmu attrn W- on ttM
Athmitiaii M-.ttoir- etrla!i.
It atl tlie fiehtiiia emthiMcd on
tl siniH-nl rer m-ar tlte Kim 'I brtdar
ltrliifoTl eiM'tm rriiraiedly puacll
htit were atway Ixiiicn with lieaTr
ItkwrM. u took lo Hnera and
wmie mat-t illicit ii -'
EY
' I'nited States may be assured that tha
fullest consideration H1 tw s'ven ths
case has been In the court nir thsn
branches of Cslif-trnla. The Mooneif
raw hui been n the courts mr thsn
two ears- !tecrd and briefs ar
voltimlnoua. It will re-pUra all the
time between nw and then rr th
careful consideration which p.tkra ta
. MooDy and tha peoi-la. demand,-
FOR
ION

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