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The Spokane woman. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1921-1935, October 14, 1926, Image 11

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88087129/1926-10-14/ed-1/seq-11/

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Thursday, October 14, 1926
NORTHEASTERN DISTRICT FEDER
ATION MEETING DRAWS BIG CROWD
Working under the leadership of
Mrs. J. E. Keiegler, president, the
Charles Greenough
Candidate for
PROSECUTING
ATTORNEY
T |
Deputy Prosecuting Attor
ney under Charles Leavy for
three years. Now chief dep
uty.
Vote for the man who has
compelled family deserters to
support their families. A suc
cessful criminal prosecutor.
Trained for the job. 1
WHY CHANGE ?
Charles H. Leavy
| Prosecuting Attorney,
Candidate for
JUDGE OF SUPERIOR
COURT
‘ - i
S E
A
You are familiar with my
record in enforcing laws re
lating to public dances and
removing from the news
stands objectionable litera
ture.
I shall appreciate your ap
proval by your support
THE SPOKANE WOMAN
Harrington Woman's Club arranged
a successful and pleasant day for the
Northeastern District Federation of
Women's Clubs Saturday. Mrs. Fred
Dorsey, chairman of the committee
on arrangements, was assisted by Mrs.
Wayne Talkington, Mrs. Frank Charl
ton, Mrs. W. E. Barmeier and Mrs. W.
H. Richardson.
Mrs. W. A. Buckley presided, and
the program, which furnished musi
cal and speaking features, was ar
ranged by Mrs. 1. M. Radabaugh of
Spokane. Women attending from this
city were Mrs. A. V. Overman, who is
secretary of the district organization;
Mrs., Radabaugh, Mrs. T. F. Kilby, Mrs.
J. K. Dow, Mrs. A. A. Salmon, Mrs.
R. K. Neill, Mrs. Joe Neill, Mrs. Paul
ine Suing Bloom, Mrs. Donald Mec-
Bride, Mrs. A. P. Fassett, Mrs. Leo
Loacker, Mrs. A. E. Johnson, F. A.
McMasters, Mrs. J. M. Forrest, Mrs.
G. L. Gilbert, Mrs, W. C. Campbell,
Mrs. Joseph Haupt, Mrs, C. E. Ship
man, Mrs. Lulu Raymond, Mrs. Charles
Duncan, Mrs. J. H. Fairborn, Mrs. J. T.
Wilson, Mrs. A. E. Crisp, Mrs, G. F.
DeGraff, Pearl Hutton Shroeder, Mrs.
Phil T. Becher.
An elaborate program will feature
the first fall luncheon of the Matinee
Musical today, as announced by Mrs,
George Prothero, chairman. Luncheon
will be at noon, with the program
scheduled for 1:30. Mrs. 8. W. Brock
will have two piano solos, “To a Wild
Rose,” and “To a Water Lily,” both
by McDowell. A paper by Mrs. S. J.
Ford on “Woodland Musie” will cover
the composers and selections appear
ing on the day’'s program. Pearl G.
Curran will have a vocal group, with
Mrs, A. J. King at the piano. She will
sing “In Autumn,” and Tosti's “Good
bye.” Mrs. A. G. Watkins has a vo
cal number.
Mrs. Fred Clemmons, Mrs. J. C.
Broad, Mrs. Chester Cole and Mrs. A.
J. Castle will sing “Trees” and “Au
tumn,” by Gaynor. Two vocal solos,
“The Forest of Oak,” by McFayden,
and “Autumn Winds so Wistful,” by
Branscombe, sung by Mrs, Verne
Chase, will complete the afternoon.
In charge of the luncheon arrange
ments are Mrs. William Stewart, Mrs.
L. R. Craigo, Mrs. Myer Ruben, Mrs.
May Elliott and Mrs. Redland.
FACTS OF FINANCE
Emilie H. Burcham, Women's De
partment, the Old National Bank
and Union Trust Company.
One important service a bank
has to offer is through its Escrow
Department.
An escrow
is a written
document, de
livered by
one person,
called the
grantor, into
the keeping
of a third
person, to be
held by him
until certain
conditions
- have been
tulfilled, the document then to be
delivered to the second person,
called the grantee.
A bank may be the “third per
son,” in the above definition. To
illustrate, if one is buying a home
or other real estate, the seller may
put into the Escrow Department the
deed and abstract of title to the
property, the payments may be
made to the Escrow Department,
and the deed and abstract be de
livered by it to the buyer when all
conditions of the sale have been met
“Greenough for Prose
cutor” Slogan Grows
To Charles Greenough, candidate for
prosecuting attorney, goes the credit
for solving for the county the problem
of a workable plan under which men
who had deserted their families could
be compelled to work at hard labor
s 0 that their families could receive
the money earned.
For years the county could do little
with the type of man that deserted his
wife and children.
Under the law provision had been
made whereby the family deserter
& i %
3 | o
B e
R~ M 5y O%
| T SP 0
g G
Bf
: Y)
You Can Always Make Ycur Home
Cozy at Less Cost with
UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE
COZINESS in furniture depends a great deal upon the springs
—we put plenty of them in HOMEASE. Hardwood frames,
richest fabrics and expert workmanship guarantees style and
comfort.
oy
BARRETT MFG. CO.
E 1724 Sprague Home of HOMEASE
\ . i
BEST TREATMENT FOR COLDS OSTEOPATHIC SURGEONS
This is the month when colds are There are seven Osteopathic Colleges
most prevalent. Homes that are not jn the United States, with over ten
kept at even temperature; exposure 10 thousand graduates. Each College has
inclement weather: too light or 100 , thoroughly equipped hospital, X-ray
h“‘l'lYhd‘;'h'.“g: overeating—especially 1§ pacteriological laboratory, and clin
a RS RS time—overstrain Of j.,| research department. Each Col
worry; inadequate rest or sleep: lack 1 gt
of fresh air—these are some of the '°B° also has a training sfhool for
things that tend to lower one's re- nurses. Th"‘ are seventy-five Oltcp
sistance and allow disease germs to gain pathic h"SP}“IS !hroughout ‘b'_ Unit
temporary foothold in the body. A ed States, in which Osteopathic sur
neglected cold may result later in bron- geons devote all their time to the prac
chitis, which often lasts all winter. tice of surgery. Some have specialized
In treating a cold, avoid the patent in Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat work.
medicines known as ‘‘cold cures,”’ for Others in general surgery. The Osteo
these remedies often put a tremendous pathic physician becomes very skilled
burden on the heart. The safest and in the practice of surgery, for more
best procedure is to see your Osteopath- time is spent in the study of anatomy
ic physician daily until all your symp- in Osteopathic Colleges than is spent
toms of cold are overcome. in the majority of Medical Colleges.
e
DR. H. E. CASTER J. E. HODGSON
DR. W. G. THWAITES DR. MARY E. COON
1. C. VAN DORN DR. H. L. CHADWICK
DR. W. T. SCHICK DR. FRANK HOLMES
could be sentenced to hard labor.
Greenough devised a plan whereby the
family deserters work under the coun
ty engineers in the maintenance work
or county roads. Through the winter
months the men cut wood for the
county. During the actual working
time $1.50 per day is paid to the fam
ilies of the men.
During the past 18 months, since
Greenough arranged for the first man
to work on the road gang, the number
has never fallen below 10, and has oft
en reached as high as 15 at one time.
Men that for years have neglected
their families have been obliged by this
means to contribute to their support.
11

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