OCR Interpretation


The Spokane woman. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1921-1935, October 21, 1926, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88087129/1926-10-21/ed-1/seq-3/

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Thursday, October 21, 1926
Brower Seeks Reelection
Sheriff Floyd Brower, republican
candidate for reelection, is proud of
the record made by his office during
Charles Greenough
Candidate for
PROSECUTING
ATTORNEY
L * °
Deputy Prosecuting Attor
ney under Charles leavy for
three years. Now chief dep
uty.
Vote for the man who has
compelled family deserters to
support their families. A suc
cessful criminal prosecutor.
Trained for the job.
WHY CHANGE ?
Charles H. Leavy
Prosecuting Attorney,
Candidate for
JUDGE OF SUPERIOR
COURT
P
oy .
i e
} }
You are familiar with my
record in enforcing laws re
lating to public dances and
removing from the news
stands objectionable litera
ture.
I shall appreciate your ap
proval by your support
THE SPOKANE WOMAN
the first six months of 1926. During
that period 628 arrests were made, a
marked increase over the previous
year. The amount of liquor confiscat
ed during the first six months of 1926
showed a decided increase over 1925,
it is said.
The twenty deputies under Brower
averaged a day of 1L hours and 45
minutes working hours during that
period. In computing this time Sun
days and holidays were included.
Sheriff Brower came to Spokane in
1907 and has resided here since. He
served as a deputy under George L.
Reid, Clarence E. Long and Harry C.
Clark. Clark appointed Brower chief
deputy, and in September, 1925, when
Clark resigned Brower was elected
sheriff,
FACTS OF FINANCE
Emilie H. Burcham, Women's De
partment, the Old National Bank
and Union Trust Company.
In Spokane, as in every large
city, there is a Clearing House As-
ed the time
and trouble
of presenting checks for payment
at each of the member banks in the
city.
Twice each day, each of the
Clearing House Banks exchange
checks with the others.
The first exchange is early in the
morning, and it includes all checks
deposited since the hour of ex
change on the previous day, the
checks having been sorted into bun
dles for each bank.
Later in the morning, a second
exchange is made, including all
checks received up to that hour.
The Straight Line Dress
With the prevalence of silk
sales everyone ought to have at
least one new dress for the first
cool fall days. The straight line
dress with sophisticated sim
plicity is not difficult to make if
one uses a proper pattern as no
longer will two pieces of cloth
looking enough alike to be called
twin sisters make the straight
line dress, Crepe satin in the
new red tone—a coppery tinted
red just the color of glowing
maple leaves in fall—is chic. A
clever band defines the low
waist line and turns into flat
box pleats on its downward path
each side of the center front.
The plaits are arranged to con
ceal any fullness through the
hips and to give breadth and
freedom at the skirt’s edge. The
collar has a smart front tab and
the semi tight sleeve is set ac
curately in the normal armhole.
Glistening Silk Hosiery
Despite the prevalence of
black as a costume and shoe
color for fall, black hosiery will
not be worn to any greater ex
tent than is usual in the fall and
winter, Women do not want a
complete black costume and re
lief afforded by light colored
hose is one of the points in mak
ing a black costume season pos
sible,. Women are not afraid of
black when relief may be had in
glistening silk nude hosiery to
match the complexion,
He said: “If 1 am elected I am free Miss Nellie M. Powers, former art
from all promises and obligations. 1 supervisor of the Spokane schools, has
expect, however, to continue the policy taken an apartment at 1760 Lewis
of close cooperation with every peace street, San Diego, Cal, where she will
officer in the vicinity.” spend the winter.
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Friday and Saturday
$5.00, $7.50, SIO.OO
The Hats that have always set the style pace—patterns mod
els, originals, copies of imports—creations from the studios of
millinery artists—your choice Friday and Saturday at $5,
$7.50 and SIO.OO,
Every material, color and shape you want is here in intrigu
ing variety and authentic good taste. Styles are so advanced
that this event coineides with new presentations elsewhere, Be
sure to attend,
. -
QXL K.
5.3 - 827
+« Howard Riverside
sociation,
The larger
banks form
this associa
tion for their
own conveni
ence in ex
changing
checks drawn
on each other
every day. By
this plan
they are spar-
WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE?
Not infrequently osteopathic physicians are asked, “What's the difference be
tween osteopathy and other non-drug manipulative methods?’’
First—Dr. A. T. Still was the original worker and a score of years ahead in
announcing his discovery of the relation of structure to disease and methods of
treatment,
Second—The osteopathic school has always maintained high standards. There
are no correspondence courses or short-cuts to the practice of osteopathy. Before
entering any one of our seven colleges the matriculant must have a college or at
least a high school certificate.
Third—He must spend at least four full years in one of our colleges in in
tensive, practical work, studying everything that any school of therapy teaches
plus the osteopathic theory and practice, in which his work majors. The osteo
pathic physician is ready to offer to his patient a thorough diagnosis and the
treatment that the case demands.
Fourth—Upon graduating he must pass the same or similar state board ex
aminations as do all other physicians.—Osteopathic Magazine.
Wmmflm.fl
DR. H. E. CASTER J. E. HODGSON
DR. W. G. THWAITES DR. MARY E. COON
1. C. VAN DORN DR. H. L. CHADWICK
DR. W. T. SCHICK DR. FRANK HOLMES
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