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The Spokane woman. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1921-1935, October 21, 1926, Image 8

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88087129/1926-10-21/ed-1/seq-8/

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Page Eight
Published Every Thursday.
Entered as second-class matter January 26, 1923, at the postoffice at Spokane, Wash
ington, under the Act of March 3, 1879. SEC
Subscription Rate: $2 per year in advance. Advertising rates sent upon application.
Pauline Suing Bloom, Editor and Publisher.
Business and Editorial Offices: 329 Rookery Building. Telephone: Main 2058,
TP 1
T it e
VOLUME V. OCTOBER 21, 1926 NUMBER 18
“Placing the taxation of growing timber on a yield basis would
eventually increase public revenue. At the present time some of the
Northern Counties are seriously embarrassed by the failure of non
resident owners to pay any tax. It would not help the State, nor the
County, nor the Township, nor the School District to have land revert
to the public for taxes for the result would be a reduction of the taxable
valuation that would compel the imposition of a confiscatory rate. The
placing of the tax on timber on a yield basis would not only tend to
restore and re-build our timber resources but to reduce the tax rate on
other property and give to the State and its municipal subdivisions a
source of greatly increased revenue in the years to come.”’—Governor
Christianson of Minnesota.
Mrs. Sherman, General Federation president, expresses the wish that
people will say of the federation that they are ‘‘the greatest active power
for upright living in the world.”” Three million women representing
sixteen thousand federated clubs! Think what this means! Is it any
wonder that the federation has been called the greatest potential power
of any organization in the world. The federated clubs of Spokane are
a part of this vast army of womankind in which the fate of the nation
rests. Theirs must be an active part in the civic life of this community.
They dare not be passive on questions which involve the moral devel
opment of the youth of the city. Public housekeeping needs hands
skilled in homemaking. Let's not shirk. Let’s elect men and women
to public office who will see that our laws are enforced.
“A commonwealth is not built by defining its boundaries and locat
ing its capital but rather in the hearts and minds of the youth of each
generation through instruction in the home, the church and the school,”
Mrs. Josephine Corliss Preston, Washington state superintendent of
education, stated last evening in her address before members of the State
Teachers’ convention at the high school auditorium at Casper, Wy
oming, last Friday.
“Character education,” Mrs. Preston continued, ““and citizenship
training build the ideal citizen as a person of character—that is, what
they really are, not what people think they are. Character is that which
causes a life to be dominated by principle rather than by mere impulse
of circumstance. Fixed principles govern the attitudes and actions when
noble ideals have been stamped into the mind in a concrete form.”
Developing music in Spokane was the keynote of the Monday lun
cheon of the Musical Art Society over which Mrs. Jesse W. Burgan
presided at the Davenport. Helen Crow Snelling, state president of the
Federated Music Clubs declared that music appreciation in America is
the standard bearer for all music. She urged true American Music ap
preciation by obtaining for American composers their rightful place in
the music world.
Developing musical tastes in young artists is the part of the Student
Artists concerts which are a part of the work of the Federation. “'ln Spo
kane last year,” Mrs. Fred Clemens stated, 56 students representing 31
teachers appeared in concert. The lack was in audiences. We got up
these splendid programs, but our weakest point was audiences—We
do not want this said of the 1926-27 concert season. Spokane is going
to encourage her young musicians.
WWWWW
T, TP o i rsmissimmnmtiniisunn il
THE SPOKANE WOMAN,
329 Rookery Building,
Spokane, Wash.
Please send me THE SPOKANE WOMAN for one year. One dollar is enclosed.
Pl e .. . s ctpossgis o ei oA sil I s ARSI <2
Address +LRBT e Te S L IR SRR e RS B B e 2 B 21
FROM ANOTHER STATE
NOVEMBER 2
MRS. PRESTON, AT CASPER, WYOMING
AMERICAN APPRECIATION
THE SPOKANE WOMAN
SOROPTIMIST
Photography is the art represented
in the Soroptimist club by Erna Bert
Nelson, who alternates with her sister,
Harriot Nelson, in managing the Bert'l
studio and assisting her father in his
studio, Nelson's, on lower Riverside.
ERNA BERT NELSON
Miss Nelson and her sister learned the
art from their father, N. B. Nelson,
whose student days were spent in Den
mark. In addition to photography
Miss Nelson studied commercial art at
the State College and is adding a
commercial art department to the stu
dio which will command her attention
for the greater part of the time.
Miss Nelson is interested in dra
matics, for which she displays unusual
aptitude. She played the lead, Molly
Gwynn, in “Joy,” the last Drama
League play given in Spokane, and
during her student days at the state
college was active in dramatic work,
She is a Sigma Kappa.
She is an ardent sports lover, and
plays tennis and swims so well that
she is the Gertrude Ederle of her set.
Shunning street cars and automobiles
she walks three miles to her office
every morning from her home at 2218
North Columbus street. Walking, she
believes, is the thing most neglected
by the girls of today. She can't un
derstand it, for besides keeping one in
the best of trim, she says, it is good
sport. The days that bring the first
snow are the most interesting time of
the year to her, though she doesn’t
mind any kind of weather, holding
fast to the sentiment expressed by
James Whitcomb Riley when he said:
“It ain't no use to grumble and com-
plain,
It's jest as cheap and easy to rejoice;
When God sorts out the weather and
sends rain,
Why, rain’s my choice.”
Miss Nelson has made all of the
photographs of Soportimists for this
column and gotten them ready for the
hand of Mrs, John Bruce Dodd, who
turns out the finished silhouettes.
A committee headed by Mrs. Glen
R. Pritchard has arranged the pro
gram for the Woman's Auxiliary to
the Railway Mail Clerks today at 1
o'clock luncheon at Culbertson’s, Mrs.
William C. Campbell will preside for
the business meeting, and Mrs. Pritch
ard will be assisted in the program
work by Mrs, A. P. Lee, Mrs. William
Rogers, Mrs, Leo Loacker, Mrs. Joseph
Haupt, Mrs, C. Renfro, Mrs. A. C. Wil
liams, Mrs. J. C. Hutzenpillar and Mrs.
Fred Shirley.
Mrs. Campbell has announced that
the annual Halloweem party will be
given on October 30 in the I. O. O, F.
hall at Opportunity, with a special
committee in charge. Mrs. Ruth M.
Coburn has been made chairman for
the occasion, and the affair will be an
evening party.
. . -
Mrs, F, B. Dean will lead a short
business meeting of the Grant pre
school circle tonight preceding its
Dad’'s Night program, in the school
building. C. W, Macomber will be the
speaker of the evening on the topic,
“The Greatest Job in the World—the
Job of Being a Dad.”
Thursday, October 21, 1926
“Weakly’’ Wanderings
By LUCILE CRITES
REPUBLICAN AND DEMOCRAT
I'M A “Dyed-in-the-Wool”
REPUBLICAN. MY wife
IS A Democrat;
WE'VE LIVED
TOGETHER FER
FIFTY YEARS,
NOW WHAT do
YOU THINK
OF THAT?
IN DAYS gone
BY, WHEN time
TO VOTE would
COME AROUND,
YOU KNOW; she'd
FRET BECAUSE
SHE HAD no
SAY; TO the
POLLS SHE
COULDN'T GO.
SHE'D GIT
ALL-FIRED
EXCITED, TOO,
HER EYES
A-FLASHIN’ so;
I'D SORT o
EGG HER ON,
YOU BET, and
TELL HER she
SHOULD GO and
STUMP THE
COUNTY FER
HER MAN; and
GIT HIM votes
LIKE THAT. She
LOOKED SO
PURTY WHEN
SHE'S MAD,
MY YOUNG
WIFE-DEMOCRAT.
* " *
BUT SINCE
SHE HAS the
RIGHT TO vote,
SHE WORKS both
NIGHT AND day;
A TALKIN' fer
HER CANDIDATE,
JEST LIKE she’s
EARNIN' PAY.
SHE CASTS her
VOTE FER the
DEMOCRATS,
WHILE STANDIN'
BY HER side,
I CAST mine
FER REPUBLICANS,
AND THEN we
MARCH WITH
PRIDE TO the
LITTLE HOME
THAT WE love
SO MUCH; in
EACH OF our
HEARTS A prayer,
THAT THE very
BEST MAN will
WIN THE race,
TO THE task
THAT I 8
WAITIN' THERE.
The Questers’ club will meet with
Mrs. L. R. Harvey, West 448 Twenty
fourth avenue, for its meeting tomor
row. Mrs. E. J. Peterson is president
of the Questers, with Mrs. Lucille El
liott Hawes as program chairman.
Mrs. Roy Bungay has the public inter
est feature of the meeting, and Mrs.
George Keith will discuss the fall elec
tions. Mrs. O. W. Wisner is ecritie,
w 9 @
“Turkish Asia” will be the topic of
the Wednesday club at its next meet
ing on October 27 at the home of Mrs.
Ricarda Bacchus, West 1203 Tenth
avenue, Mrs, W, A, Hurd will be as
sisting hostess. Mrs, W, W, Stillman
will have the paper on Arabia and Per
sla. Mrs. A. E. Johnson will describe
the home of the poet Sirdusi, and
readings from his work will be given
by Mrs. G. W, Wragg, The program
will be concluded with Oriental musie.

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