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Title:
Elk City mining news. : (Elk City, Idaho) 1903-1913
Place of publication:
Elk City, Idaho
Geographic coverage:
  • Buffalo, Idaho, Idaho  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
  • Buffalo Hump, Idaho, Idaho  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
  • Crooked River, Idaho, Idaho  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
  • Dixie, Idaho, Idaho  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
  • Elk City, Idaho, Idaho  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
  • Newsome, Idaho, Idaho  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
  • Red River, Idaho, Idaho  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
  • Red River Hot Springs, Idaho, Idaho  |  View more titles from this: City County, State
Publisher:
C. Hofstetter
Dates of publication:
1903-1913
Description:
  • Ceased in 1913.
  • Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 25, 1903)-
Frequency:
Weekly
Language:
  • English
Subjects:
  • Buffalo (Idaho)--Newspapers.
  • Buffalo Hump (Idaho)--Newspapers.
  • Crooked River (Idaho)--Newspapers.
  • Dixie (Idaho)--Newspapers.
  • Elk City (Idaho)--Newspapers.
  • Idaho--Buffalo Hump.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01305516
  • Idaho--Dixie.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01227972
  • Idaho--Elk City.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01300741
  • Idaho--Red River Hot Springs.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01886501
  • Idaho--Red River.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01299215
  • Newsome (Idaho)--Newspapers.
  • Red River (Idaho)--Newspapers.
  • Red River Hot Springs (Idaho)--Newspapers.
LCCN:
sn 88087183
OCLC:
18768651
Holdings:
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Elk City mining news. December 25, 1903 , Image 1

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Elk City Mining News

Elk City was a mining town that popped up between Elk Creek and American Creek after gold was discovered in the nearby Clearwater River in 1861. The boom town quickly ballooned to 2,000 inhabitants before discoveries in nearby mines in Montana siphoned off workers. Placer mining, the mining of steam bed deposits for minerals, was lucrative in the area. James and William Galbraith established an express operation, shipping nearly a million dollars' worth of gold dust by the end of the 1862 season. Miners leased newly-constructed mining ditches, saw mills opened to supply lumber, and Chinese miners found success placer mining in Elk City, and in the 1880s Chinese inhabitants of Elk City outnumbered whites. In 1887 white men from Coeur d'Alene entered the camp and took the best claims owned by Chinese miners. The matter went to the courts, and in 1889 Judge Sweet decided that "aliens" could not own mining ground under U.S. mining law. According to the Butte Miner, this resulted in a sharp and quick decline of the Chinese population in mining camps along the Clearwater River. In the 1890s, mining in the area continued and dredging techniques were introduced.

The Elk City Mining News was published from 1903-1913 with eight pages and six columns. The paper was published weekly on Saturdays until 1910, when the publication day changed to Thursday. George F. Hamilton published the paper. Charles Hofstetter was its first editor, followed by JLC McCaffrey in 1905. The Mining News ran with the tagline, "A weekly journal devoted to the interests of the Elk City, Red River, Crooked River, Newsome, Dixie, and Buffalo Hump Mining Camps." Regular features included serialized fiction, "Amalgum," which covered local businesses and social news, "Mines and Mining News," and "News of the Northwest," which focused on Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. Although the papercovered national news, there was often a focus on mining-related issues. The Mining News ceased publication in 1913.

Provided by: Idaho State Historical Society