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Newport daily independent. (Newport, Ark.) 1901-1929, January 07, 1905, Image 1

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port Daily Independent.
—mmmmm—mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm . SMHMM
NEWPORT, ARKANSAS. SATURDAY, JANUARY 7. 1905. NUMBER 216.
sly Shot by
riday After
lern Cotton
Mill.
nol shot Tom Dan
fternoon about 4:30
the Southern Cotton
this city, where both
ployed. The two ne
d engaged in a friendly
during which Daniels
1 Flanol, and this angered
e went to his home, secured
ingle barrel shot gun loaded
ith No. 5 shot, returned to the
ill and as he entered the door
down upon Daniels and
fired away. The whole charge
nek the negro in the abdomen
was at first thought to have
oeen a fatal shot. He was alive
Saturday, however, and chances
favored his recovery.
Flanol reloaded his gun and
ipped, going first to his
mother’s home on Remmel ave
nue, then striking out for Duke
Revel’s, on the island. Officers
pursued and passed him in hid
lg. He returned to town and
gave hin^self up next morning.
Both negroes are said to be good
NEGRO CHILD
BURNED TO DEATH.
f J Monday morning about 10
H o’clock the fire alarm was given 1
W and the fire was soon located at:
J Bud Shell’s, colored, in the east-:
•*u-ern part of town, says the Bates- [
ville Guard, anti before assist- j
ance could be rendered the flames j
had reached such proportions ■
that they could not be managed. :
It appears that Shell’s wife had
gone over to a neighbor’s, about
fifty yards away, leaving two
children, one about two and a
half and the other about one and
a half years old, in the house,
and had not much more than
reached her destination when
flames were seen in the building.
A colored man happened along
about that time and broke down
the door, but the flames burst
out at the opening and rendered
him powerless. In the excite-;
ment the children were forgot
ten and the younger one was
burned to death, after having
crawled to the back door. The.
oldest one made its escape.
HOLDING COTTON
FOR HIGHER PRICES.!
!
Heber, Jan. 5.—The farmers’)
union is growing very fast in
this county. The farmers gener-!
^ ally are holding their cotton for j
higher prices. There are at least j
2,500'bales of cotton in Cleburne j
, county. Most of the cotton has !
been gathered and ginned, and j
the farmers have the cotton un-1
/pier the shed to be kept until they !
can get 10 cents a pound for it. j
INFANT TAKES LONG TRIP.
Beebe, Jan. 6.—Mrs. Mary j
Cole, fiee Baker, died at Chat- j
ham, Mont., a week ago and her!
husband brought her remains to
DeSoto, Mo., for interment.
Mrs. D. D. Cole and Miss Mary ,
Cole,/the latter the postmistress
of this place, attended the burial
and brought back with them the
little babe, one day old at its
mother’s death. The infant
stood the trip of 2,500 miles with
out a murmur.
TRESTLE WORK TO
BRANSON’S BRIDGE.
- i
From the north end the steel
has reached a point south of
Reed Spring about fifteen miles
north of Branson on White river,
says the Cotter Courier. Between
Reed Spring and Branson are five
miles of trestles and bridges
which are being puffin as fast as
the material can be put on the
ground. No work has been done
on the bridge at Branson and
probably little will be done before
the track is laid to the river next
spring when Branson will be
come the terminal and remain so
until the bridge has been com
pleted.
PINE BLUFF WANTS
A NEW BUILDING.
Board of Trade Asks Representa
tive and Senators to Work
for Appropriation.
Pine Bluff, Jan. 6.—Capt. J.
B. Johnson, secretary of the
board of trade, is sending letters
to Senators Berry and Clarke and
Congressman Robinson asking
each of these gentlemen to work
in the interest of the federal ap
propriation for a new postoffice
building at Pine Bluff.
Capt. Johnson thinks that Pine
Bluff should get her share of the
$10,000,000 appropriation asked
for by Secretary Shaw, and that
both the senators and Mr. Rob
inson will work to get a large
appropriation for Pine Bluff.
I IN SOCIETY. |
^"?V% "’i^
THE MUSICAL COTERIE.
Thursday afternoon the Musi
cal Coterie met with Mrs. J. H.
McHugh, twelve responding to
roll call with beautiful quota
tions.
The president called for busi
ness first and all carried over
from the previous meeting was
finished. By the last of this
month the Coterie expects to
have possession of its club rooms,
which are being painted and pa
pered in the club’s colors.
Early in February the members
will give a benefit concert, the
formal1 opening of Newport’s
first music organization. A fine
program is being prepared and
the ladies expect their friends to
lend encouragement by a hearty
patronage. Due notice will be
*._ ~ X* i-U ~ J,.x~
^IVCIi Lilt; tlCl LL.
Two names were added to the
active membership.
After appointing committees
on year book, printing, etc., the
following program was enjoyed:
Waltz song, Mrs. G. A. Hill
house.
Instrumental duet, Mesdames
Crook and Beard.
Instrumental solo, Mrs. T. H.
Reamey.
Life of Paderewski, Mrs. Geo.
Sink.
Paderewski pictures, Mrs. C.
E. Crook.
Rubenstein is the composer for
January 19.
TO PROTECT QUAIL
FOR FIVE YEARS.
Bentonville, Jan. 5.— Notice
has been published in this coun
ty that the general assembly of
the state of Arkansas, at the
next session, beginning January
9, will be called upon to enact a
law prohibiting the killing,
maiming or transporting from
the state or county, in any con
dition, the common quail of our
county for the period of five
years next ensuing.
Read the Daily and Weekly
Independent.
“HEREAFTER” AFFECTED
INNOCENT’S MIND.
Vouched-for Story That Young
Arkansan Lost His Mind
Brooding Over Glimpse
Into Next World.
Rogers, Jan. 6.—A gentleman
from Madison county who is vis
iting in Rogers vouches for the
! truth of the following:
Last summer Jasper Ray, the
20-year-old son of Henry Ray,
an old and well known citizen of
Madison county and a minister
of the gospel, attended the
I world’s fair. While there he
! visited one of the “pike” at
I tractions known as “Hereafter.”
The aim of the management
was to make the place as myste
rious and hair-raising as possible.
There were ghosts, devils,
spooks, etc., without number.
The experience there is said to
have made a great impression
upon the mind of the young man
and he brooded over the matter.
Soon afterwards he heard a
sermon upon the mysteries of the
hereafter which only served to
further unbalance his mind, and
the informant says that young I
Ray is now in a serious condi
tion and has to be closely guard
ed to prevent him from doing
violence to himself.
VICTIM OE HIS
OWN REVOLVER.
J. S. Luttrell, formerly living
north of Newport, who recently
left here for Shawnee, Tex.,
overland, happened to a very
serious accident when within one
day’s drive of his destination.
The family were sitting around
the camp fire, when Luttrell took
his revolver from the scabbard to
clean it, and in replacing the
weapon, accidentally discharg
ed it.
The ball entered the left thigh
of Mr. Luttrell and passed al
most through, being removed by
a physician later, as it had lodg
ed just beneath the skin. Mr.
Luttrell is recovering from the
effects of his wound, and expects
to make a crop this year in Red
River county, being much pleas- j
ed with the country.
CHERRY’S DEFEAT MAY
MEAN SHAKING UP.!
The defeat of L. W. Cherry
for re-election as a member of
the school board of Little Rock
has again awakened an interest
in the prospect of a change being
made in the position of superin
tendent of the city schools. This
has been more or less a factor
for several years, although not
every time an open issue in the
election of school directors. Mr.
Cherry has been one of Super-|
intendent Rightsell’s strong ad
herents. It is said that the new
school board will consider a
change. Among those most
prominently mentioned as his
successor in this important post
are J. J. Doyne, former state
superintendent, and J. H. Hine
mon, the present state superin
tendent.
—-—•
EPIDEMIC SEEMS
TO HAVE STARTED.
Little Rock, Dec. 6. — W. R.
McLaughlin, lessee and manager
of the Knapp plantation at Tol
tec, reports the destruction by
fire of his cotton house together j
with thirty bales of cotton in
seed Wednesday night. The loss
is about $1,500 without any insu
rance. It is the belief that the
.fire was of incendiary origin.
OPERA HOUSE
TUESDAY, JANUARY 10.

Those Famous Funny Fellows,
WOOD & WARD,
presenting their everlasting,
singing, ringing, tom-fooling
farce. Two Merry Tramps; 17
big musical numbers. Good goods
at regular prices—25, 50 and 75.
Don't Travel;
Talk.
IT’S CHEAPER
The use of the Long
Distance Telephone lines
of this company will save
you many a journey, long
and short—Every town
of importance in Texas,
Arkansas, Oklahoma ana
Indian Territories within
reach. Also far distant
points in the North and
East.
The Sooth westernTelegraph
and Telephone Co.
JAMES L. JONES.
• '
Solicits your
NOTARIAL BUSINESS,
And promises
Prompt and Careful Attention
To Your Business.
List your Property
For Quick Sates
With me. I guaran
tee best results.
R. W. BANDY,
CHAST1AN BUILDING.
DR. CHAS. E. CARROLL
%
Dentist
Gives special attention to
Crown and Bridge Work,
And correction of Irregularities
of the Teeth.
Office Watson Bldg. Phone, 63.
Newport, - Arkansas.
SAW MILL FOR SALE.
Saw mill and 1,000 acres of
oak for sale cheap. Party de
sires to look after other business.
Apply at this office. This mill
is a bargain and can be secured
for $450.
Everything in our entire
store has been reduced dur
ing this sale. Wolff-Goldman
Merc. Co. 13btf
Read the Daily and Weekly
Independent
*
Great Sale of
Manhattan Shirts.
“Best Known, Known as the Best.”
As different as chalk is from cheese describes the dif
ference between Manhattan Shirts and the ordinary,
commonplace kind.
For Two Days Only
and for Cash,
Tuesday, January f Oth, and Wednesday, January itth,
all of oar $1.50 and $2.00 kind for
—ft ffff—^
They consist of Negligee and Stiff Bosoms;
Separate and attached cans. fTis 'noagh said.
First come, first served—No favorites. “Get the
Habit.” Remember the dates; 2 days only,
Tuesday and Wednesday, January f Oth and \ \ th.
Get the Get the
Habit. Habit.
BANKING YOUR MONEY
With us is an altogether safe
and sensible proposition.
WE LOAN MONEY
On proper security and in
reasonable sums, always
giving preference to the ap
plication of a regular cus
tomer.
Arkansas Bank and Trust Co.
Capita! $100,000.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
J. W. Grubbs, President. Nathan Graham, V.-Pres.
Chas. G. Henry, Cashier.
B. B. Bond, M. D. Campbell, S. D. Campbell,
G. D. Clements, R. F. Drummond, W. D. McLain,
F. D. Fulkerson, C. J. Saenger, Abe Heilegers,
0. D. Watson, L. Minor. L. E. Willis,
J. S. Wilmans.
Jack Herron
For Granitoid and Stone Walks,
Curbing, all kinds of Brick Work.
Don’t fail to get my figures
before contracting.
My Work Talks For Itself
Parties wanting crushed Lime
Stone Walks apply to me.
FOR LEASE.
NEWPORT OPERA HOUSE.
Possession given the 1st day
of April, 1905, together with the
scenery, fixtures, furniture, etc.
Seating capacity 500. Stage 40
feet. Scenery in good condition
and furniture in good repair.
Good piano. Bids received up to
February 1st and right reserved
to reject any and all bids. Ap
ply to
L. Minor, Secretary,
or I. Goldman, President,
98bta Newport Building Ass’n.
Wanted — Hickory logs and
poles delivered f. o. b. tracks
Choctaw Railway. Write for
prices and particulars.
James Colbert & Co.,
92btf Tupelo, Ark.
1, 25,000 },
New Words
are added in the last edition of Web
ster’s International Dictionary.
The Gazetteer of the World, and
the Biographical Dictionary have
been completely revised. The In
ternational is kept always abreast
of the times. It takes constant
work, expensive work and worry,
hut it is the only way to keep the
dictionary the
Standard
Authority
of the English-speaking world.
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leads.
It is the favorite with Judges,
Scholars, Educators, Printers, etc.,
in this ar. 1 foreign countries.
A postal card v. ill bring you in
teresting specimen pages, etc.
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Springfield, Mass.,
PUBLISHERS OF iNTERNATIUKAL/
\ DICTIONARY,/
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INTERNATIONAL
DICTIONARY |

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