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Newport daily independent. (Newport, Ark.) 1901-1929, September 15, 1913, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89051130/1913-09-15/ed-1/seq-2/

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The independent
PERCY H. VAN DYKE
Publisher and Editor
front St., NEWPORT, ARK.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES.
Daily—Single copy, I cants; par
Week 10 cants; par month, 40 canto;
rr year, $4.50 in advanes, by carriar
city, by mail in coma try.
Weekly—$1.00 per year, payable la
advance.
Entered at the postsAss, Newport,
Arkansas, as lecond-clasa mail mat
ter.
ANNOUNCEMENTS.
kj
For Counly Judge.
The Independent is authorized to
announce the candidacy of W. D. Mc
Lain for the office of county and pro
bate judge of Jackson County, subject
to the action of the Democratic pri
mary.
For Treasurer.
The Independent is authorized to
announce the candidacy of John H.
Camp for the office of Treasurer of
Jackson County, subject to the action j
of the Democratic primary. J
Saving the Babies.
Everybdy feels qualified to.
give advice about the care of ba- j
bies, particularly the people who j
never had any of their own, and
therefore know the least about
them
Too much advice has caused
lots of little ones to be laid away
in their graves.
But good advice, by those who
Have proved their theories by
saving the lives of thousands of
bahiesi is better than gold
The state board of health of
New York has made a remark
able record in the reduction of
the death rate of children under
one year o}d. The figures for the
last ten years are almost unbe
lievable, yet they are statistical
facts. They show in general
that only one baby dies where
three used to die.
Much has been done in New
York towns in the way of estab
lishing pure milk stations and in
specting and regulating cow sta
bles. But the state board of
health chiefly attributes the re
duction in the death rate to the
fact that these simple rules have
been ceaselessly dinned into the
ears of mothers.
“Give the baby pure air, day
and night.
“Give it no food but mother’s
milk, milk from the bottle, or
food directed by the physician.
“Whenever it cries or is fret
ful, do not offer it food; give it
water.
“Be sure that it gets enough
sleep—two naps during the day
•at least.
“Do not put too much clothing
on it.”
“Bathe it in a tub every day.
“Don’t handle it; leave it
alone.”
—=
The Children Who Do Not Go to
School.
More than 1,000,000 boys and
girls in the United States who
ought to go to school this month
will not do so because they must
work in such factories or other
occupations as are undesirable
for them. Secretary Owen Love
joy of the National Child Labor
Committee says that all the girls
and nine-tenths of the boys who
in this way at an early age go to
work enter low-wage industries,
and all their lives remain unskill
ed workers.
He further estimates that
about one-half of those under 16
years of age now at work in all
occupations are white American
children, one or both of whose
parents are native born. It is
observed that native families
and foreign families are equally
willing to let their children enter
factories before they have reach
ed the age of 16. The Connecti
cut State Labor Commission
studied more than 11,000 women
and girls, representing 14 racial
groups, and found a larger per
centage of American fathers
among the workers under 16
than among the older workers.
The latest volume of the feder
al report on the condition of wo
man and child wage earners
makes a like showing- Of the 28
racial groups into which the 93,
000 workers are divided, but j
four races, representing less
than one-tenth of the total, had a
larger percentage of workers un
der 16 than the native white
Americans. Of all the workers
of all races studied in 23 indus
tries in 17 states, one in 12 was
under 16 years. Of the Ameri
can workers in the same indus
tries and in the same states, one
in 11 was under 16.
What remedy is there for
such a situation ? Laws can ef
fectively and justly reach pa
rents who, because of disbelief
in the value of education, keep
their children from school and
put them to work, although not
dependent on them for financial
aid. On the other hand, what
can be done in the case of chil
dren who must work to support
themselves or their parents or
both ? Bare poverty is too often
the only reason for the child
wage earner. The problem is |
one far from solution, if ever it
can be solved at all.—Richmond
Times-Democrat.
Backward, turn backward, Oh
time in your flight, and give us a
girl whose skirts are not tight.
Give us a girl whose charms
though few, are not exposed by
too much peek-a-boo. Give us a
girl, no matter what age, who
won’t use the streets as a vaude
1 j. • i i
1 cotton. One put his money in the bank and the other did li
1 Mt They were held up on their way home. The silly fel- 1
I tew who wanted to take his money home had to “deliver” I
1 to tiie robbers. The other was able to give them the laugh I
1 —his money was in the bank. |
I ARKANSAS BANK S TRUST CO. I
ville stage* Give us a girl not
' too sharply in view. Dress her
in skirts that the sun can’t shine
through.—Walt Mason.
Fighting Over Franchise.
i Little Rock. Sept. 14—Appeal
has been filed in the state su
preme court in the case of F.
W. and R. A. Tomlinson of Me
• na, to test the decision of Judge
Hendricks of the Pulaski Cir
cuit Court relative to the city
| ordinance passed by the Mena
City Council granting Tomlin
|son Brothers the franchise for
an electric light plant. A ref
erendum was ordered upon the
ordinance by a petition of citi
zens, and this was opposed by
the Tomlinsons, who claimed
that there was no law granting
the right of referendum on such
matters. The suit was heard in
this circuit court, as the prayer
was for an injunction to pro
hibit Secretary of State Hodges
from certifying out the petition.
The Circuit Judge dismissed the
injunction proceedings, on the
ground that the complaint was
insufficient; hence the appeal to
the supreme court.
Resignations Are Sought.
Earle, Sept. 14. — Telegrams
are being sent out to taxpayers
of the district, asking for
their presence at Marion, Ai'k.,
Sept. 15, for the purpose of
asking Governor Hays to de
mand the resignation of all of
the members of the St. Francis
Levee Board. The Board is in
such a muddle that citizens feel
that the credit or standing can
not be restored unless all the
members resign- Circuit court
will be in session at Marion next
week and a large crowd is look
ed for at the beginning of court,
as levee matters are the chief
topic on the streets. It is pre
dicted that unless the members
resign of their own accord or do
so on request of Gov. Hays, in
all probability a receiver of the
district will be applied for in
order to get the affairs of the
board in better shape and be put
on a business basis
Attorney Injured In Fight.
Jonesboro, Sept. 14.— D- C.
Joslin of this city, deputy pros
ecuting attorney of the Lake
City District, was assaulted and
severely cut in the head at Mo
nette today by Alex McDonald,
as a result of a prosecution a
gainst a son of McDonald and
four others, charged with dis
turbing religious worship. The
attorney was standing whittling
with his knife when McDonald
approached him, speaking to
him in a friendly manner, and
after doing so, took Joslin’s
knife from his hand and without
warning, Joslin alleges, cut
[him. The wounded man has
jone cut on the top of his head
land a slight one on the side ot
his face, but neither is consid
ered serious. McDonald and
Clarence Meadows are under ar
rest, charged with assault with
intent to kill and accessory, re
spectively.
Governor Calls Mass Meeting
Little Rock, Sept. 15—A
I mass meeting of the taxpayers
’ in the St. Francis Levee Dis
| trict to be Held in Marion, Crit
tenden county, September 30,
will be called today by Gov. Geo.
W. Hays. The meeting will be a
result of agitation and unrest
among the people of the district
that has resulted from years of
turmoil and charges of miscon
duct among those controlling
the district’s finances, which,
during the last few days, have
caused numerous petitions and
telegrams to be sent the govern
or. Some of the telegrams, it
-s said, contained the informa
tion that unless some move to
remove the members of the
board is made, the people of the
iistrict themselves will organi
ze and take the matter in hand.
The nature of the plan,
}
I ladies. We Would Be Pleag
1 To Have You Call and See our New Fall Good,
Or At Least The Part Which Hav*
Arrived. 6
BrocadedV elvet,
Brocaded Paon Velvet for trimmings.
The new Mandaline light weight.
Duryea stripes.
Diagonal Serges, 52 inches, all colors.
We cau Show You All The New Silks
in Corticelli and Pine Tree Mills,
1 Keinemann's Dry Goods Store
r—m i—in an an an rr=n.R=n rpn iph rpn rpn
anSS^ailanlanlanlahia0*^3111^
through which l'elief will be
sought, is unknown. Some are
clamoring for a removal of the
entire Board of Directors, but
others, comprising the larger
majority of the people of the
district, do not suggest a means
for remedy, being content to de
sire a straightening out of the
affairs. ,
I) II—J1 IL—H Hr—‘I Udi UC=J •U UC=J uc=J ua u*— w-— —
Little Luna White is much 1
better today from her relapse of j
typhoid fever four weeks ago,
being entirely clear of fever.
The ladies Aid of the Baptist
church will meet Tuesday after
noon with Mrs. Gus Jowers
Miss Sadie Esty of Little Rock
will be present and talk to the
ladies. All members are urged
to be present.
WAIT--Coming' Soon
NEWPORT I AA
Saturday vGDli £m\3
NOW the GREATEST TENTED EXHIBITION in the WORLD
4 BIG SHOWS IN ONE
Times Its Former Size
EVERYTHING NEW THIS YEAR BUT THE TITLF
Will Positively Exhibit Twice Daily—At 2:00 and at 8:00 p. m.
20 - BIG FEATURE ACTS - 20
2 Herds PERFORMING ELEPHANTS
100 Beautiful Horses. 100 Shetland
Ponies
EXTRA! ADDED! EXTRA! •
The Largest and Costliest Collection of Wild and Domestic Ani
mals carried by any show is now to be seen with GEN TRY BROS
ALL NEW FEATURE SHOWS, 4
A FORTRUNE EXPENDED rncr Cj. j nim nr
In our MAGNIFICENT NEW MlCC StfCCt PARADE1
Which POSITIVELY takes place rain or shine, 10:30 a. m., show |
day.
A SOLID MILE OF GOLD AND GLITTER.
Doors Open for Inspection of Me nagerie at 1 and 7 p. m._Per
formance Commences 1 Hour Later.
-ua itaa uciJianejjgj
w. A. MIN
CONTRACTOR
and BUILDER
Solicits an Opportunity!
Make Yoa A
Bid
PHONE 208
Residence 1511 Dewey Ar
NEWPORT, ARKANSA
ooooooooocoooooooooooi
Dr. W. A. ROSSlli
DENTIST.
Earl Building
Phene 21
NEWPORT, ARKANSA
j-_—I
ROOMS 21 AND SI
WISHON BUILDING I
| NEWPORT, ARKADI
C. R. GRA1
PHYSICIAN I
and SURGEON I
EARL BUILDlJ
OFFICE HOURS: I
9a.m.toll2'.o- I
2 p. m. to 5 p. b- I
Office Telephone 20 J
foTS]
I sashTuw®1 I
Q SHINGLES ■
| doors, br^J
I NEW LUMBER ^!
| Lower End Frontal
i ESTIMATES Fl^1811!
Telephone Z7» 1
^SOOCX’dtr ^OOOtXJOO00®*^
NoTsixSSj
This is a prescription pf^ag
tor MALARIA "
Five or six doses will ^
f taken then as • ton' ^ M
•eturn. It «ofs °
Calomel and does not g Jg|

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