OCR Interpretation


The Sentinel=record. (Hot Springs, Ark.) 1900-current, December 24, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arkansas State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89051285/1912-12-24/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

CLASSIFIED ADS!
In the Sentinel-Record today will not '
miss any of the really good things
that are on the market, and you. like
as not, will find just w'hat you want.
A classified advertisement In the Sen- i
tinel-Record will reach the real buy
ers and sellers. Try it once.
VOLUME XXXII. HOT SPRINGS, ARKANSAS, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 24, 1912. NO.
67.
■—' ' ■ ■ - - 11 ' ——I
THE WEATHER
I WASHINGTON, DEC. 2T—FOTtE
| CAST FOR ARKANSAS—FAIR
I TUESDAY AND PROBABLY WED
j NE5SDAY.
L„ - i i .i.ili'IlirTiSBI' -I I.iii.gad
ALTON TRAIN
IS HELD UP
——-.
ROBBERS REPORTED TO HAVE
SECURED IN THE NEIGHBOOR
HOOD OF $50,000.
PASSENGERS NOT MOLESTED
Robber* Forced Engineer and Fire
man to Uncouple the Engine and
Express Car and Run it
Away From the Train,
Springfield, 111., Dec. 24.—The “Al
ton HtimimT,” fast passenger train,
southbound on the Chicago and Al
ton railroad, was held up by four
masked men about midnight, near
lies station, four miles south of here.
The robbers detached the engine
and express car ana compelled the1
engineer to rim two miles down the
track, where they used dynamite in
an attempt to blow open the safes in
the express car.
According to railroad and express
officials, the robbers obtained very
little of value, although it is said the
safes contained a large sum of money
and much jewelry.
None of the passengers on the
train was disturbed. The sheriff and
a posse who went lit pursuit, exchang
ed several shots with the robbers Just
as they were leaving tllie express car
but no one was injured. The rob
bers carried with them two pouobes
containing papers, which were of no
value to them.
I nests uiey aruyiJBU uunii* me pur
suit by the posse and the pouches
were recovered. The report to the
tailroad officers ttiere says that while
one robber compelled the engineer
and fireman to walk back and forth
with their hands up, the other bandit
used {wo charges of nitroglycerine
upon tha safe unsuccessfully and then
tried dynamite without success. .The
safe was badiy battered.
Engineer O. K. Banks, of the switch
engine, currying the officers, said:
'I darkened the lh ad light. \Yheu
we approached the scene of the hold
up, 1 saw the men working in the
ditch over the packages they had stol
en from the express car. When they
discovered we had officers on board,
they ran and disappeared in tlhe dark
ness with officers in pursuit.”
The “Hummer” carrying extra ex
cess and baggage cars, because of
the extra Christinas traffic, was one
of the heaviest loaded passenger
trains which left Chicago for the west
tonight.
In addition to the smoking car. day
coach, chair car, parlor cars, diner
and buffet library’ car, the train car
ried a number of sleeping cars, all
of which were filled. The train was
reported to have carried a large con
signment of valuable holiday ex
press, including considerable jewelry
and in addition, a shipment of money
to Kansas City.
The bandits, who held the train up
In a thick woods just south of lies,
did not attempt to molest the pas
sengers in the six cars of the train.
They turned their guns upon the
ci w of the engine, took possession,
ran tlhe engine to a safe distance and
rifled the national express car of all
the contents.
It. is reported that the robbers ob
tained valuables worth about $50,000.
The robbers exploded fcjbir charges
of dynamite In efforts to open the ex
press car safes, but failed in the at
tempt. They left, carrying a few
packages which were found later in a
fi Id near-by. Special agents and de
tectives give chase and several vol
leys of shots were exchanged. No
one. was injured as far as is known.
T e safes were badly damaged, but
no loss is believed to ihave occurred.
BABY BURNED TO DEATH.
Little Sister Alio So Badly Burned
That She Will Die.
Louisville, Ky., Dec. 2;!.- ^ hue
I dr mother was absent from the
house baling their Christmas pre«
er.ta today, 18-mothsold Georgia
8i hubneil was "burned to dentil and
her sister, Marguerite, 8 years, was
so badly burned that sflie probably
will die. Sparks from a grate before
which the baby was lying In a peram
bulator, set fire to her clothes. The
sister was burned in trying to save
the baby's life. Itssers-by rushed in
to the hous? and extinguished the
flames that enveloped the older girl
POLICEMAN INDICTED.
Is Charged With Extortion and Brib
ery by New York Grand Jury.
New York, Dec. 23— Indictments
charging extortion and bribery were
returned today by the grand jury
against Policeman John J. Skelly,
-Manny Maas, and Sol. Woolfe, a sa
loon keeper.
, The indictments are based on the
testimony of Mrs. Mary Goode, form
er keeper of a disorderly house, and
her negro maid, before the grand jury
in connection with the alleged pay
ment by Mrs. Goode of $25 "protec
tion” money.
Policeman Skelly is now being tri
ed before a deputy police commission
er on charges growing out of Mrs.
Goode's recent testimony before the
Aldermanic committee.
MOWAT RELEASED.
Detroit, Mich., Dec. 23.—Robert
Mowat, a Detroit broker, who was
taken in custody by tlhe local police
Saturday at the request of private
detectives representing the American
Bankers association, was released to
day when tlie detectives failed to
present a warrant for Mowat's arrest.
Mowat was detained, according to the
police because the d^'ectives said he
was wanted in connection with an
alleged $73,000 check swindling
"deal” worked in New York and oth
er cities.
OFFER MADE FOR
MONTGOMERY CLUB
LITTLE ROCK WILLING TO GIVE
$15,000 TO GET BACK IN SOUTH
SRN LEAGUE.
Little Rock, Ark., Dec. 23.—At a
mass meeting held this afternoon a
resolution was adopted that Presi
dent W. M. Kavanaugh be authorized
to offer R. W. Tilles of Moitgomery,
owner of the Montgomery franchise
in the Southern League, $15,000 for
the franchise.
Mr. Tilka had given President
Kavanaugh an option on the fran
chise for $20,000 but it was unanimous
ly decided that this price was exces
sive and that rather than pay it. Lit
tle Rock would remain out of the
Southern League.
It was said that Montgomery has
disposed of all of its valuable players
ami that Maimeer Dobbs was the only
asset that would go with the fran
chise. it was said that Little Rock
would be put to heavy expense in
buying players and that for this rea
•oii. the price or $20,000 asked by
Tilles would not be paid.
It was also said that should Mr.
Tilles ace. pt offer of $15,000 the
money would promptly be raised and
hat Little Rock would at once re
place Montgomery in the Southern
l^eague.
President Kavanaugh said he (had
positive assurance that the other
clubs would agree t.o the transfer of
Montgomery’s franchase to Little
Rock.
UNDESIRABLE ALIEN.
New York, Dec. 23—Eduard F.
Mylius, th Englishman convicted in
Ixmdon of libelling King George V.
and sentenced to serve a year in pri
son, was ordered deported today by
the commissioner of immigration at
Ellis Island. Mylius was held to be
an undesirable alien.
Mylius published a sensational
story that the English king had con
tracted a Morganatic marriage in
Malta in 1880. The story was dis
proved in an action for libel brought
against him by the solicitor general
of England.
He was sentenced to a years impri
sonment, Ibis term expiring Dec. 7,
iaii.
GEORGE TYLER DEAD.
X. w York, Dec. 23.—George H.
Tyler, a well known in theatrical cir
cles and father of George C. Tyler,
managing director oi the Liebler
company, died at th is Ihome here today.
Mr. Tyler was an ardent admirer of
the national game and was well
known in baseball circles as in the
theatrical world. He formerly owned
a newspaper in ChilUoothe, Ohio.
ARLINGTON XMAS BALL.
The week's gala event, from a
social standpoint, will be the Christ
mas night ball at tihe Arlington hotel.
The ball is always a stellar feature of
the Spa’s winter season and the
management is henl upon making it
equally as successful as any of its
many illustrious predecessors. All
friends of the popular hostelry arc
cordially invited to attend the ball
and join the guests at the Arlington
in the merry making.
DICTIONARY COUPON No. 50
NEW WEBSTERIAN (1912) DICTIONARY, ILLUSTRATED.
six coupon ,ec-A o;c. »;;j. r,p.■
s sss :;2 8£* ss s«~„s?x.r
<3..0..cHp,,P.PO—
Thl. rounon clipped from the Sentinel-Record for six consecutive
This Coupon, cl,Ppea named below, entitles the reader to
days, and the expense bonus nameo
choice of three different styles of the
TO SQUEEZE
TURKS OUT
ALLIES DEMAND ALL BUT LIT
TLE MORE THAN SITE OF
THE TURKISH CAPITAL.
TURKEY SAYS IMPOSSIBLE
Adjournment Taken Until Saturday
to Give Ottoman Delegates Char.ce
to Consider—Aegean Islands
and Crete Included.
Tendon, Dec. 23.—After several
days of preliminary skirmishing in
accordance with the cherished tradi
tions of diplomacy, the Turkish dele
gales today faced the real attack of
the allies at the fifth meeting of the
peace conference which has as an
object tlhe settling of the war between
the Balkan allies and Turkey.
The victorious allies held their
most important cards on the table.
These were in the form ot territorial
conditions which they had agreed to
impose on the Ottoman empire. The
demands as s t forth were:
First—The cession ny Turkey of
all the territory west of a line start
ing from a point east of Rodesta, on
ithe sea of Marmora, to a point In
the bay of Malatra on the Black sea
and excluding the peninsula of Calli
poli. Albanias statu's to be decided
by the powers.
Second—'The cession of Aegean is
lands occupied by the Greek forces
in the present war and by the Italians
in the recent war.
Third—The cession to Greece of all
Turkish rights in the Island of Crete.
The allies did not reveal today the
financial proposals wfhich they will
make to Turkey, reserving them for
a luture meeting. #
Before the allies presented their
specifications today the Turks an
nounced that their government was
prepared to proceed with the negotia
tions, leaving the question of revict
tiallying Adrlanople for discussion be
tween Turkey and Bulgaria. They
abandoned their previous request to
provision Scutari and Jananl.
The formal conference lasted only
a quarter of an hour. The Turks lis
tened to the proclamation of the fate
of their European empire without
formal comment and asked for an ad
journment until Saturday to consider
tie aide's demands. In the formal
conversation with the delegates which
consumed an hour the Turks asserted
it would he impossible for them to
accept such terms, but that statement
is inevitable in meetings of tlhis char
acter and was expected today.
The territorial profits of the war
which the allies will divide are the
same as those published in these des
patcnes Dec. it, wnn tne exception
of the arrangement of the powers
made for Albania. The allies will
recognize the autonomy of Albania,
under tihe suzerainty of the porte, but
not its sovereignty. Albania will be
come what Crete was and w.bat Egypt
is in its relations to Turkey. The
Sultan will be the nominal ruler, but
without fiiolltical, ladminiat/raHve (or
military ipower. He will have the
right to raise his flag in Albania and
appoint a resident governor, but only
for the purpose of ratifying the de
cisions of the local government. All
lhe delegates attended today's ses
sion. Every one appreciated the fact
that the meeting was to mark Hhe
passage of the deliberations from the
preliminary stage to that of real nego
tiations and that it was destined to
revise the map of eastern Europe.
The atmosphere of the stately coun
cil chamber was charged with intense
feeling through the iproceedings.
M. Novakovit,iOi, head of the Ser
vian delegations took the chair. On
his right was M. Nikolitch, speaker of
the Servian parliament and on his
left M. Vosniteh, the Servian minis
ter to France.- The president of the
conference asked Rechad Pasha, head
of the Turkish delegation to notify
tfhe conference as to the instructions
he had received from Constantinople.
Rechad Pasha replied that the Im
perial Ottoman government had In
structed him to treat with all the
allies, Greece included, without any
conditions.
Dealing with the question of revict
ualling the beseiged fortresses, Re
chad Pasha said Turkey even was
ready to lay aside tfhe cases of Scii
tarl and Janina. In Adrianople he
said it was known the hospitals were
over-crowded and their patients lack
ing in primary necessities. Women,
children and the aged were suffering
or starving. He must Insist, he said,
on provisioning* Adrianople to an ex
tent. which would meet the demands
of humanity, hut which would be in
sufficient to place the belligerents in
a better position than they llield when
the armistice was signed.
Rechad said he was animated by
a desire to avoid procrastination, and
the question might be dealt with di
rectly between the Turks and the
Bulgarians, thus making it possible
for the conference to continue. The
heads of the allied delegations ex
pressed satisfaction witn iiecthad’s
statement.
Then M. Novakovitdb, tall and er
ect, rose, holding in his hand a large
sheet of paper. It was the crucial
moment of the conference and all
eyes were turned upon him. The Bal
kan delegates showed emotion and
anxiety; the Turks appeared as im
passive as statutes.
“All the secondary questions hav
ing been settled, the moment Ihas
come to explain the conditions under
wthjch the allies are ready to con
clude peace, “M. Novakovitch an
nounced. Then he proceeded to read
the demands of the Balkan states.
When he had finished all eyes shift
ed to the representatives of tlhe sul
tan.
Rechad Pasha rose again, and in
his habitual slow manner asked for
a written copy of the proposals. M.
Novakovitch ordered the secretary to
make the copy and the delegates left
their seats and Joined in an animated
and cordial conversation.
During the long wait for the copy
of the demands, and while disclaiming
any desire to enter into a discussion
of their merits, the Turks said that,
speaking unofficially, they considered
the allies terms to have been design
ed for the purpose of breaking off the
conference. When the delegates had
signed the documents, Rechad asked
for an adjournment until Saturday in
order to consider the proposals and
hris request was granted.
Among diplomats here the opinion
prevails thaet notwithstanding what
the Turks consider the inacceptable
conditions presented by the allies an<J
what, the allies declare are terms
which cannot he reduced, peace ulti
mately will be concluded. It is re
marked that the allies and the Turks
when the armistice was concluded,
were in exactly the same position as
the Russians and the Japanese when
the Unfted States induced them to
adhere to the Portsmouth conference.
Both the Turks and the Bulgarians
are at Tchatalja in a state of ex
haustion. Now both have strength
ened themselves but neitiher really is
sure what would happen were the
conflict resumed. The Turks fear
further reverses and irreparable los
ses and the allies, who already have
obtained successes which In their
rosiest dreams they never had expect
ed. fear to endanger the position they
have gatnea.
Owing to thi§ reciprocal apprehen
sion. peace maj yet be secured.
If European mediation iB impossible
or unsuccessful, others may be ap
pealed to, first of all, the United
States. It is even rumored that there
is a possibility of asking mediation
by the pope. It is recalled that Pope
Leo XIII was entrusted by Bistnark
with the settling of the disputes be
tween Germany and Spain over the
Carolina Islands. In case his Holi
ness were the mediator in the pres
ent controversy, his action would be
entirely independent as none of tihe
billigerants is a Catholic power.
It is considered the best person to
approach the Vatican for mediation
would be M. Miyuskovitch, one of the
Montenegrin delegates to the peace
conference who was Montenegrin en
voy to {he Holy See in the negotia
tions for an agreement concerning
the Catholic hierarchy in Montenegro,
and the appointment of an archbislhop
at Antivari.
The conference of ambassadors will
meet again Jan. 2. Meanwhile, the
German ambassador has gone to Ber
lin, and M. Cambon, the French am
bassador, is spending the holidays in
Paris. Count Mensdorff, the Austro
Hungarian ambassador, and Sir Ed
ward Grey, the British foreign secre
tary, are in the countr* for Christ
mas.
i
TRUSTED EMPLOYE
LEAVES WITH CASH
HERMAN ERHLICH OF BIRMING
HAM IS BEING SOUGHT FOR
ALLEGED $45,000 SHORTAGE.
Birmingham, A)a.. IJec. 23.—Her
man Erhlich, confidential assistant to
lands Pizitz, owner of one of the
largest department stores in Birming
ham, has disappeared after 21 years
service with his employer, leaving an
alleged shortage estimated at $45,
600. Mr. Pizitz has offered $500 re
ward for his arrest.
Employes in the store trusted Ehr
lich to such an extent that they plac
ed $30,000 of their savings with him.
He had charge of Mrs, Pizitz's per
sonal account, $1,600 of which is
missing at a Birmingham bank.
“Erlich came to America with me
from Germany,” said Mr. Pizitz, “and
I trusted him a* one of my own fam
ily. I have not been to the bank in
five years. 1 left the deposits and
other banking business entirely with
him.”
WILD AND WOOLY EAST.
Railway Ticket Clerks Held Up in
Old Western Style.
Buffalo, N. Y„ Dee. 23.—Within
sight of scores of people a highway
man late this afternoon, held up two
clerks in the city ticket office of the
Grand Trunk' railway and got awa)
with $327.
Jos. E. Edwards, chief clerk, and
Harold D. Mowrey, a stenographer,
were behind the desk when the man
entered and after drawing a revolver,
threatened to kill tlliem If they made
an outcry. He then walked behind
the counter, rifled the cash drawers
of all the bills in sight and fled.
CONTESTANTS
TO START NEW
WITH THE PASSING OF CHRIST
MAS ALL THE CONTESTANTS
WILL TAKE FRESH HOLD
RACE GROWS INTERESTING
In The Final Lap Watch Out For Some
New and Interesting Contenders
For First Honors in Piano Vot
ing Contest.
Christmas festivities ana activities
have in a measure occupied the time
of the contestants in the Sentinel
Record's his voting contest, but in
spite of this the workers have made
the most of their spare time and all
have been accumulating some votes.
The race Ihas grown decidedly
more interesting in the past, few days
and as the time of the contest ipro
gresses it will continue to grow in
interest, not atone from the stand
point of the present leaders in the
race, but also on account of several
new contenders who expect to make
an effort to catch up with the leaders
as soon as the holiday season has
passed. There will remain three full
weeks of llhe contest following Christ
mas, more time than has already been
consumed by the contest, and these
three weeks will be the real active
weeks of the race.
vvno will Will uie piano: i ms
question is asked a hundred times a
day at the Sentinel-Record office and
on the street, but this is a question
which time alone will tell. It would
be foolhlh to even hazard a guess as
to the winner at this time. A number
of candidates at present in the list
have a chance to win the piano. It
all depends on the canvass of the last
three weeks. Good earnest work will
count and the contestants are pre
paring to do tnetr best work in the
latter half of the contest.
One thing is certain. The lady
wfho wins the ipiano will be delighted
with her success in the contest, and
those who have not been fortunate
enough to secure the largest number
of votes, will receive In cash, prem
iums whiich will well compensate
them for their effort.
Remember tihe single coupon on
page one expires next Saturday. Do
not overlook this opportunity to In
crease your vote. Be sure to bring or
turn them in next Saturday afternoon
at four o’clock.
It will be noted by the vote of the
past three or four days that the
friends of same of the contestants
who have been far down the list have
rallied to their support and aided
them to better their standing. This
is l#ie right spirit to manifest. With
out support these candidates would
have hut little opportunity to climb to
the top. With your aid and that of
other friends she might yet attain the
position of honor and become a warm
contestant for the piano,
All Ul« CiiiiuiUttitJS «» c to v;u u
gratulated on the large number of new
subscriptions they are turning in. The
contestants have been at work only
two weeks and tihe field for new sub
scriptions is still a large one, barely
touched by the canvass up to this
time, and the new subscriptions count
votes much faster than old ones.
The magnificent Leyhe piano, which
was shipped from the factory on Dec.
12, should arrive any day. It has
likely been delayed a trifle on account
of the holiday transportation rush,
but it is expected on every train and
will be placed on exhibition at A. G.
Rhodes & Son furniture store as soon
as it can be unpacked. All candidates
are interested in its arrival, and their
friends have also manifested a splen
did interest in the arrival of the
grand prize.
There is a change in the vote stand
ing today. Look it over and see if
you do not care to aid some of the
workers and worthy of any support
you may give.
SUSPECT CONFESSED ROBBERY.
Chicago, Dec. 23.—Frank Williams,
aUeged dynamiter, under arrest in
nmncction with the police investiga
tion of the murder of J. H. Logue, to
day told Captain Halpin, that he and
Clyde Stratton, another suspect now
under arrest, robbed the postoffice at
McCool, lnd., on Dec. 17. Williams
said tliiey obtained several hundred
dollars and a quantity of stamps.
Stratton denied the story told by Wil
liams.
All the women taken in custody in
connection with ttoe case were re
leased today.
WANT GOTCH’S TLTLE.
Minneapolis, Minn., Dec. 23.—HTenry
Ordermann of Minneapolis will meet
Jess Westergaard of Des Moines, la.,
here Tuesday night, Jan. 7. it was an
nounced tonight. The winner of the
match, which will be at straight
cateh-as-catch-can style will claim the
heavyweight wrestling c ham pious ip
of America, as Frank Gotch ha* re
tired. ■
MENINGITIS EPIDEMIC.
Shotgun Quarantine I* being Main- 1
tained at Midville, Ga.
Midvine, Ga., Dee. 23.—'Armed depu
ties were stationed today on every
public road entering this place to en
force the quarantine declared as a
result of title meningitis epidemic i
which »u to tire present time has 1
caused twelve deaths. No deaths were 1
reported today and only one addi
tional case developed. Nine patients
now an' being- treated.
The general exodus of citizens was |
stopped today when the guards w ere !
stationed to enforce the quarantine. 1
Advices from the adjoining towns of
Mi,llen and Waynesboro state Hint
fugitives from Midville have been
isolated and will be kept under quar
antine for two weeks.
Physicians placed In charge of tihe
situation by Burke courty offl ials to
day expressed the belief that the
epidemic is under cointrol.
Gov. Brown Authorizes Asking Fed
eral Aid.
Atlhnta, Ga., Dec. 23.—Governor
Joseph M. Brown, today telegraphed
Dr. Samuel C. Benedict,, president of
the stare board of health, urging him
not to hesitate to invoke federal aid
to stay the Midville, Ga., meningi
tis epidemic, if, in the opinion of hhe
board of health that action seemed
advisabip.
“GENERAL” JONES
KEEPS ON THE MARCH
ALL MEMBERS OF THE “ARMY”
PROFESS TO BE IN GOOD
MARCHING CONDITION.
Upper .Red Hook, N. Y., Dec. 2:?. —
“General” Rosalie Jones and her lit
tle band of suffragists hiked into this
village at 6 o'clock tonight after the
six mile walk from Rheinbeek. Ev
ery member of the "army’’ professes
to be in good marching condition and
ready to continue the trip to Albany
tomorrow.
The schedule calls for a walk of
fourteen miles to Hudson tomorrow,
but late tonight It was tihought the
suffragettes would walk but six miles
to Livingston, continuing to Hudson
on jnhrl/Btmas.
Ail along the country roads today
the pedestralns were cordially greet
ed and several addresses on "votes
for women” were made to crowds In
Red Hook and this village.
The prediction of snow for the
morrow caused but little worrying
among the member® of the army.
GOVERNOR GRANTS
ALEXANDER RESPITE
DECLARES HE WOULD NOT CON
SENT TO HANG A MAN WHOM
HE BELIEVED INSANE.
Little Rock, Ark., Dec. 23.—Gov.
Donaghey, today granted a respite un
til June 27, to W. C. Alexander, under
sentence to be hanged Friday for the
m’urder of J. P. Kelly, a railroad em
ploye at. PLne Bluff. Gov. Donaghey’s
term will expire January 15, and he
said he granted the respite because
he would not assume responsibility
for hanging a man whom he believed
to be insane. Two juries (have in
I vestigated Alexander’s sanity. One
pronounced him sane and the other
was unable to agree. Gov. Donaghey
then appointed a commission of aleln
ists to examine Alexander and the
live physicians agreed that Alexander
is Insane.
CAPT. ANGEVINE DEAD.
Mrs. A. Angevine received word yes
terday that her husband, Captain W
F. Angevine, of Milwaukee, ,had died
suddenly, at Milwaukee Sunday even
ing. She left immediately for Mil
waukee. The message contained no
details of the1 sudden death of Captain
Angevine. The widow is connected
with the Arlington hotel, and Captain
Angevine had been a frequent visitor
to this city.
KILLING IN BREATHITT COUNTY.
Jatkeon. Ky., Dec. 233.—Frank Os
born. merchant of this city, was shot
and killed here tonight in hie store.
! Dexter and John Howard, brothers,
| were arrested and are under guard in
the Breathitt county jail. No cause
for the shooting is kuown by the po
lice.
NEGRO ATTEMPTS TO HOLD UP
TRAIN- IN OKLAHOMA AND IS
KILLED BY OFFICER.
FIRST BATTLES WITH PORTER
Robber Had Held Up and Robbed the
Conductor and Had Entered Ex
press Car and Had Messen
ger Covered When Killed.
Tulsa. Okal., Deo. 23.—An unidenti
fled negro was shot and instantly
killed while attempting to rob the
crew and passengers of St. Louis and
San Francisco train No. 412. Okla
homa City to Kansas City, shortly af
ter the train left C,’handler early this
evening. It is clulmed the negro hud
killed another negro before boarding
the train. The bandit was shot by an
operative of the Burns’ detective
agency who was a passenger.
The following account of the at
tempted hold-up was given the As
sociated Press by passengers aboard
the train, and verified by Conductor
Fahr, when the train reached Tulsa:
Conductor Fahr boarded the Irotit
end of the smoking car as the train
pulled out. of Chandler, and had just
ascended the steps when the negro
darted from behind the station build
ings, boarded the train directly be
hind Fahr and held him up before he
could enter the coach. After reliev
ing Fahr of all valuables, the negro
forced him to back through the door
into uie express ear.
'Entering the express ear, the negro
covered the express messenger and
ordered him to open the safe, de
claring that if the safe was not open
ed within two minutes toe would kill
both the conductor and messenger.
At this juncture the negro train
porter, who had observed the bandit
while he was robbing the conductor,
came forward, threw open the ex
press . car door and began firing.
While shots were being exchanged,
tlie conductor and express messenger
slipped open the side door and jump
ed off the train, which was running at
a moderate speed.
The train jiorter, his ammunition
exhausted, ran back through the train
and spread the alarm. W. E. Gordon,
an operative of a private detective
bureau, was the only one carrying
fire arms, and rushed forward. The
first three shots Gordon fired struck
tlie negro, who Immediately surren
dered. The train was then returned
to Chandler wUiere the robber died
just as the sheriff took charge of him
for the killing of another negro earl
ier In the evening.
The conductor and messenger were
uninjured and continued their trip.
BANKER REMOVED
FROM HOSPITAL TO JAIL
HE IS CHARGED WITH LARCENY
AND EMBEZZLEMENT OF
FUNDS OF BANK.
Memphis, Tenn., I>ec. 23.—L. T.
Ward, a former minister and cashier
of the suspended batik of Collierville.
Tenn., was taken from a local hospi
tal. where he was a patient, to the
county Jail, late today and imprison
ed charged with larceny and the em
bezzlement of $38,000 of the bank s
fund. An indictment against Ward
was returned several days ago hut
because of his illness he was not ar
rested until today when county phy
sician T. C. Graves examined the ac
cused banker, and reported that he
was not suffering from a serious ail
ment. Ward’s condition was attri
buted to a nervous collapse.
RcituL was fixed at $20,000 but up to
a lat^hour tonight it has not been
furnished. The bank of Ooilrerviiie
closd its doors several months ago.
It Is Charged that Ward used funds
of the institution to promote private
enterprises among them a cement
company located at Chattanooga,
Tenn.
NOMINATION BALLOT
COUNTING ONE VOTE.
For Miss or ..
Address .'...
In The SENTINEL-RECORD PIANO CONTEST, subject to
conditions governing contest.
Ballots to be counted must be separated, carefully trimmed
around border and deposited unfolded.
Use this ballot to vote for yourself or a friend In the Piano
Contest.
THIS BALLOT WILL BE VOID AT 4p.m.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 28,.

xml | txt