OCR Interpretation


The Sentinel=record. (Hot Springs, Ark.) 1900-current, January 03, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arkansas State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89051285/1913-01-03/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

i Hi1 ‘' ' mHml-Mtmtk r,,KWEATHER|
|~TTr~'T 22 ~~2 THE ONLY NEWSPAPER IN HOT SPRINGS THAT RECEIVES THE FULL ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORT OVER LEASED WIRES day and Saturday warmer
i All the Real News I — .. - — -- Saturday.
1 ;i' 1 . ~ j VOLUME XXXII. hot springs, Arkansas, Friday, January 3, 1913. no. 76. -—r.
Expired as Result of Stroke
of Apoplexy at His
Home at 12:35
Physician Had Been Called and Was
Just Entering the Door When
Senator Davis Expired.
Little Rock. Ark., Jan. 3.—United
States Senator Jeff Davis died at his
home In Little iRock at 12:35 this
morning of apoplexy.
About midnlgiht Senator Davis call
ed his son and said he was feeling
badly. The son called a physician
and remained at his father’s bedside.
As the physician entered the door
tiie senator feel hack and expired.
Senator Davis had complained of
feeling ill early in the evening. The
■ amily physician however said that
his condition was not serious. How
ever the senator still complaining re
tired early. He htjd apparently been
sleeping soundly up to the time he
called for his son.
Senator Davis returned home from
Washington for the holidays, appar
ently in good health. He was about
on the streets as usual during the
day.
During his last political campaign
in September, there was general com
ment cn the fact tihat he did not use
the fiery political methods that char
acterized his earlier campaigns.
He is survived by a widow and
seven children. The oldest son Wal
lace, aged 24, has been associated
with the senator in his law office.
His eldest daughter. Miss Bessie, has
acted as his private secretary. His
other dhiidreii, Janie, Jeff, Jr., lna,
Lucile and Lewis, are students in
local schools. Senator Davis’ aged
mother, who Is 84 years old still lives
at Russellville. The senator was
twice married, tho second time about
a year ago.
Besides being a picturesque char
acter in Washington during his one
term in the senate, which began in
1B07. United States Senator Jeff
Davis had the distinction of being
t e only man elected to the governor
ship of Arkansas three times. Pre
vious to his six years incumbency as
governor of his state, Mr. Davis had
been prosecuting attorney of the
fifth Arkansas judicial district and in
ixys was elected attorney genera! of
the state.
Mr. Davis was horn in Little River
county. Ark.. In 1862, and received
his education at Russellville Ark.,
and at Vandervilt university, graduat
ing from the latter institution iff 1884
• He was admitted to the bar the
same year and soon after began to
practice.
Senator Davis’ terns would have ex
pired March 4, of this year. At the
democratic state primary last March,
he defeated Former Congress
man Stephen Brundige for nomina
tion as senator. As tihe legislature
is overwhelmingly democratic, he
would have been re-elected as soon as
the legislature convened.
Crov. Donaghey, at an early -hour
this morning, said he thought it in
appropriate to discuss the matter of
the appointment of Senator Davis'
successor.
Senator Davis' Death Occasions Pro
found Regret at National Capital.
Washin^ton^ Jan. 3.—The sudden
death of Senator Jeff Davis of Arkan
sas, came as a distinct surprise and
fthock to his friends in the capitol
tills morning. The senator left Wash
ington, Dec. 13, to spend the Christ
mas holidays a( home and at that
time appeared in the best of spirits.
He had not been in good health for
some time, although his condition did
not occasion his friends mtuth alarm.
On one or two occasions his friends
say, he had suffered front attacks of
dizziness. On recovering from these
attacks lie invariably marie light of
them. Since taking his seat in the
senate in 1907, Senator DavlB had
grown steadily In the esteem of his
fellow members. At first he was
regarded as an extreme radical in
his views.
When deatih overtook him he was
chairman of the senate committee on
th*> Mississippi river and its tribu
taries and a member of the commit
tee on claims, coast and insular sur
vey, interior department expendi
tures, immigration, Indian depreda
tions, private land claims and public
lauds.
A committee of Jhe senate will be
named to attend the funeral, together
with t'iie entire delegaion in the house
from Arkansas, with others, as soon
as the sergeant-at-arms of the senate
and ttiouse are apprised of the plans
for the funeral. Telegrams were sent
this morning to his family inquiring
as to these plans.
VIOLATED PARCELS POST LAW.
Shipment of Live Lobsters and
Shrimps Put in New York Office.
New York, ,Ian. 2.—The first viola
tion of the parcels post law was dis
covered here this afternoon wilien a
queer looking package addressed to
Philadelphia was opened to reveal a
live lobster and a handful of live
shrimp. Under the law, live shell
8sh are classed as ‘‘unmallable mat
ter." The package was held up.
More than lfiOO packages were mail
ed at the general postofhce here to
day and many thousands more at the
branothes. At the Grand Central sta
tion broneh 8.000 bundles came in
during the morning from suburban
towns. Among them were forty car
tons containing eggs.
Only a small percentage of persons
using the parcels post today took ad
vantage of the privilege to have their
packages insured.
GOVERNOR DONAGBEY
GRANTS M’VAY RESPITE
HIS EXECUTION HAS BEEN STAY
ED FOR ONE WEEK BY AC
TION OF GOVERNOR.
I

Little Rock, Ark., Jan. 2.—Gov.
George \V. Donagthey, tonight granted
a respite until Jan. 10 to John Mc
Vay, who was sentenced to be hang
ed at Pine Bluff tomorrow, but who
has been declared Insane by a jury
empanelled by Sheriff Brewster or
Pine Bluff.
McVay became violent several days
ago and before he could be subdued
and removed to a hospital, slightly
injured two of the prison guards.
Another jury will lie empannelled be
fore the respite expires to again pass
on his sanity.
McVay killed J. W. Etheridge of
Fall Back. Miss., last November, while
Etheridge's trial for the killing of a
relative of McVay was in progress.
REVENUE BILL TONIGHT.
Will Be the Mor,t Important Work of
Adjourned Session of the Council.
When the city council holds Its ad
journed session tonight, the foremost
matter for consideration will be the
revenue hill which has been mater
ially changed, and will he up for first
^consideration. ( The 'bill alters the
revenue considerably, though it does
not raise except In the matter of
transcients, who otherwise contri
bute little for the privilege they en
joy. The council will also take up
the saloon licenses for the coming
year.
I 11 .. - -- ■ ----- ■■
I
[ DICTIONARY COUPON No. 59 j
This Coupon, clipped from the Sentinel-Record for six consecutive
days, and the expense bonus named below, entitles the reader to
choice of three different styles of the
NEW WEBSTERIAN (1912) DICTIONARY. ILLUSTRATED.
Six coupons and 98c—A $4.00 Dictionary, bound In limp leather.
Six coupons and 81c—A $3.0C Dictionary bound in half leather.
Six coupons and 48c—A $2.00 Dictionary bound in cloth.
(See description and conditions O" another page).
Friday, .January .1, T 91
LUITPOLD OF BAVARIA
Luitpold, prince regent of Bavaria,
la falling so rapidly in health and
strength that the death of the ninety
two-year-old ruler may be looked for
at any moment.
CINCINNATI VISITED
DY DESTRUCTIVE FIRE
HEAVY SNOW STORM HAMPERED
THE WORK OF THE FIREMEN
—LOSS $250,000.
Cincinnati. Jan. 3.—The Carlisle
building, a seven-story stone struc
ture, at the intersection of Fourth
avenue and Walnut street, was al
most gutted by tire early this morn
ing, entailing a loss .of about a quar
ter of a million dollars.
The building is in the commercial
district near the Gibson hotel, which
was destroyed by fire several weeks
ago. Among the firms damaged was
rhe Provident Savings bank, and
Trust company, the Missouri Pacific
offices, Rendigs-Lothman company,
which suffered heavily in tthe Gibson
house fire, and Frohman and company
wholesale jwelers.
A heavy snow storm hampered
work of the firemen.
WOULD REDUCE RATES.
Washington, Jan. 2.—The Chicago
board of trade today petitioned the
inter-state commerce commission to
reduce to 7H cents tne rate on grain
for export from Omaha. The price
from that point to Chicago now' is
12 cents on wheat and 11 cents on
coarse grain and the charge is made
that it is unjust, as compared with
a rate of 15*^ cents from Omaha to
New Orleans
GOV. MARSHALL
ON GAMBLING
VICE PRESIDENT-ELECT ADVO
CATES NATIONAL LEGISLA
TION AGAINST THE EVIL.
Chicago. .Tan. 2.—Gov. Thomas Tt.
Marshal) of Indiana, vice president
elect of the United States, in reply
for aid in a local crusade against
gambling, today advocated national
legislation against gambling and
promised 'his aid in obtaining such
laws.
“It is too late for me to change
my message to the general assembly
of Indiana,” he wrote to the leader
in the anti-gambling war here, “but
I suggest that you bring the matter
before the incoming congress of the
United States. 1 shall be clad to ren
der you any assistance In stamping
out gambling.”
BIG INHERITANCE TAX.
Salt Lake City, Utah Jan. 2.—The
fnhertance tax paid to the state of
Utah, by the estate of the late E.
H. Harriman, will cover about two
thirds the cost of tthe erection of the
state oapitol, which was contracted
for today. The Hhrrlman estate paid
the state nearly three quarters of a
million dollars and this was set aside
bV the last legislature as a capitol
fund.
The building will cost f 1.040,000
BAILEY IN
LAST SPEECH
PICTURESQUE SENATOR FROM
TEXAS ATTACKS THE INITIA
TIVE AND REFERENDUM.
MAKES ATTACK ON HEARST
Says Proposed Reforms Would Put
Reins of Government in Hands of
the Idle, the Unskilled and
the Vicious.
Washington, Jan. 2.—Senator Jos.
W. Bailey, of Texas, long one of the
picturesque figures and striking
speakers of the United States senate
delivered today before crowded floors
and galleries, ’his final speech as a
member of that body. Within a day
or two his resigns ion will be laid
b.efcre the senate Pnd communicated
to <>ov. Colquitt of Texas, his expec
tation being that R. M. Johnston, of
Houston, will be named to fill out Ails
term, which would end March 4.
Senator Bailey’s speech was an at
tack upon the principles of the ini
tiative and referendum as Institutions
that would, if adopted, bring about
the overthrow of the present system
of American government. He said
they originated in the desire of poli
ticians 'to escape the responsibility
tor action on such petty questions as
We location of state capitals and the
settlement of prohibition fights. As
nstitutions of government he declar
ed that the schemes for direct legisla
tion by the people would convert the
United States from a republic into a
democracy and would give its con
trol into "the hands of the unskilled,
the idle and the vicious.”
An attack upon Wm. R. Hearst in
the course of (his speech in which 'he
characterized Mr. Hearst as a “mis
erable dog” and who had “hounded
‘lim.” brought Senator Astmrst of Ari
zona to his feet. He attempted to
answer this phase of Mr. Bailey's at
tack uiton radical newspapers and
magazines but was stopped by the
Texas senator with the remark Hint
he “could make that reply outside.”
Later Mr. Anhurst took the floor in
his own right, and in the course of
his defense of the system of direct
rovernment, paid a tribute to Mr.
Hearst, as a loyal American citizen.
Galleries were crowded to their ut
most capacity and long lines of peo
ple waited In the corridors for an op
portunity to hear the Texans rare
well address to the senate. To the
membership of the senate, was added
nearly 75 members of the house, who
filled the benches and lined the walls
ilong the floor of t«he chamber. Sena
tor Bailey spoke for four hours and
throughout that time he received the
closest attention from members and
spectators. As he concluded, a wave
>f applause swept through the gal
leries. bringing a sharp reprimand
from Senator Oallinger, the presiding
officer.
h'resiaeni-eiect wiisun, aunuusu
quoted liberally by Senator Bailey in
defense of bis declaration that direct
egislation Is not in accord with the
principle of American government,
received only this commendation
”rom the Texas senator:
“If the man we have elected presi
dent of the United States gives the
country a sane and satisfactory ad
ministration,’’ he declared, “the re
publican party will never nominate
another candidate for tihe presidency.
"Why should you,” he continued,
advancing toward the republican side
of the chamber. "You didn't carry
but two states this year, and those
two of the smallest. The contest four
years from now will be between us
and the Rooseveltians. He (Roose
velt) will take some more, but thank
Clod, they will be tihe kind we can
afford to lose.
“Our conflict is with Roosevelt. If
our president believes he can take
the radical vote away from Roosevelt,
he is mistaken. The only man who
can do that and he has not succeeded
well, is Bugene V Debs. He is the
only man wtho can out-Roosevelt
Roosevelt in attracting the radical
vote. What the democratic parly
needs is not tihe radical but the demo
cratic.”
Much of Senator Bailey's speech
was devoted to excerpts and quota
tions from the writings of the men
who organized and first administered
the American government and to stu
dents who had in inter years discus
sed the effect of direct legislation up
on its principles. From the former
he drew what 'he said was unques
tionable proof that the United States
began as a representative govern
ment and not a democracy of direct
legislation. From the latter, among
whom was governor Wilson, he quot
ed to show that the opinion of the
students was that the people were
not so well qualified to legislate as
were seasoned men selected by them
who framed tflieir legislation in de
liberate assembly. At one point Sena
tor Bailey produced a book of 208
pages' which he said represented the
o2 questions submitted to the direct,
SIR RUDOLF SLATIN
Slatln Pasha, hero of the ware
against the Mahdi and once the cap
tive of that leader, has been given the
grand cross of the Victorian order by
King George. Sir Rudolf le an hon
orary major general In the British
army and for 12 years has been In
spector general of the Sudan.
vote of the people of Oregon in one
year.
‘‘Now, honor bright,” he said, “how
many citizens do you suppose there
are w'ho studied Whose questions?
How many understood them when
they do study them? I do not mean
to reflect on the intelligence of the
people, when I say they could not un
derstand them with the opportunity
they were given to study tiliem. 1
could not do it myself.”
He declared that in Switzerland
the people hud become disgusted with
Hie constant necessity of voting on
questions of government and had
gradually refused to go to the polls.
A compulsory voting law, he said,
had not proven feasible and they
finally determined to pay voters.
“Make*’em vote, and if they won't,
pay ’em to vote, is the principle sug
gested," said Mr. Hailey.
Mr. Hailey declared tlhat in states
where constitutional amendments’had
been submitted to the people, hut a
small proportion of the citizens vot
ed upon them. In Wisconsin, he said,
it ran as low as from 24 to 26 per
cent. In Oregon, he declared, on a
question involving the future 'of the
state’s university in which the pub
lic had become keenly interested but
SO per cent ihad voted upon the ques
tion.
Senator Ashurst, answering Sena
tor Bailey, declared that the percen
tage of people who voted on public
questions in the states where direct
legislation was attempted, was fully
as great as the percentage of United
States senators "sworn and paid to
vote on legislation” who voted on
the majority of the subjects before
the senate.
Senator Ashurst, in ’his defense of
Mr. Hearst, declared tlhat his name
was associated with the success ot
many projects to promote the happi
ness of the people and the perpetuity
of American institutions; and declar
ed tiiat he was a “Ann friend, a lov
ing husband and a faithful father.”
“More than that, I need not say;
less tihan that I could not say,” he
added.
WHITELAW REID’S
BODY NEARS ROME
BATTLESHIPS CONVEYING IT
SIGHTED ABREAST FIRE IS
LAND THIS MORNING.
%
New York, .Jan. .'1.—Far out from
shore, their lights hardly discernible
in the thick weather, the British'
Natal, bringing home the body of
the late Ambassador to England,
Wihitelaw Held, and her escort of six
United States warships, came abrdast
of Fire Island at 1 o’clock this morn
ing. The British war craft was tuft
at Nantucket at 9 o’clock Thursday
morning by the American vessels.
The program is for the Natal and her
escorting squadron to enter t'he har
bor at an early hour and steam up the
Hudson to their final anchorage here
about 10 o’clock.
WOULD STOP HAZING.
Washington, Jan. 2.—With a view to
preventing (hazing at the naval acad
emy, Senator Perkins of California
introduced a bill which would make
n rartet dismissed for having Ineligi
ble for reappointment and also iuell
glibel for appointment as a commis
sioned officer in the army, navy or
marine corps, until after the gradua
tion of the class of which he was a
member.
ARCHIBAND MAY TESTIFY.
Washington, Jan.. 2.—Judge Robert
W. Archbald of the United States
commerce court may take the witness
stand in the senate tomorrow during
progress of the impeachment trial
against him. The impeachment court
reconvenes at 1:30 o'clock after a
recess since Dec. 19. Judge Arch
bald’s attorneys will put on several
t
N*
additional witnesses to testify as to
ills character and business relations.
In case the examination of these
witnesses is concluded In llhe after
noon it is expected Judge Archbald
will testify. Members of the senate
anticipate that all testimony will
have been presented before the con
clusion of Saturday's session. Argu
ments will be presented early npxt
week and a decision Is expected soon.
FINALLY KILLED HIMSELF.
Epernay, France, Jan. 2.—A new
years suicide out of the ordinary
was committed here late last night
by Oaetan Valencin, a workman, aged
2ti, who had been disappointed In
love.
Valencin placed a dynamite cart
ridge on his breast and caused it to
explode. He was frightfully burned
but not mortally hurt. He then stab
bed himself twice over the (heart. He
was still able to walk, and remarked
to some neighbors who had rushed
In: "I have# started to kill myself
and now 1 am going to finish.”
He thereupon placed another dyna
mite cartridge in his mouth, lighted
the fuse and waited for the explosion
whlnh tore his bead into fragments.
IN THE VOTE
WORKERS IN SENTINEL-RECORD
PIANO CONTEST ACCOMPLISH
SPLENDID RESULTS.
FINE PIANO IS THE MAGNET
All Arp Desirous of Winning This
Splendid Instrument, But All Will
Win Cash Premiums If They
• Fail to Get Piano.
The Sentinel-Record's Piano voting
contest goes merrily or, with the
candidates making faster gains since
the first of the year. All report that
they are able to secure more sub
scriptions, and consequently more
ballots, since January 1st has past,
and all expect to roll up a big vote
between this date and January 15,
tihe date on which the name of the
lucky lady will become know-n.
The race has developed Into a close
contest between several of the can
didates and this interest promises to
remain a feature of the contest to
tihe end.
One feature of the contest which
is very gratifying to both the con
testants and to the Sentinel-Record
is the number of new subscriptions
being secured by tihe solicitors. The
number has been an agreeable sur
prise, and yesterday when the con
testants turned their biggest bunCh
of new subscriptions, they demon
strated what they are liekly to do
during the remainder of tne contest.
New subscriptions count more votes
for the candidates, and the workers
have surprised tfhemselves at the
ease with whioh new subscriptions to
the Sentinel-Record can be secured.
There’s a reason for this, of course.
The Sentinel-Record Is the omly pa
per in the City receiving the full day
and night Associated Press report,
and readers of this paper get tihe
same news of the world that they
would get If tihey bought a metropoli
tan paper. This is a feature which
prospective subscribers should bear
in mind.
All the candidates and their friends
are busy again this week saving the
coupons from the paper. The cou
pon 'now running expires on Satur
day, January 4, at four o’clock, and
should be in the hands of the con
test manager at that time in order to
be counted in the vote standing.
All the candidates are high in their
praise of tihe Sentinel-Record for its
generous increase of the percentage
of cash which they may win, in case
they fail to win the piano. There
will be some handsome cash prizes
awarded at the end of the contest, in
addition to the magntflcent piano and
U.e beautiful 125000 writing desk.
If any have not seen the splendid
Leyhe piano which constitutes the
first prize in the contest, they are
urged to see it in the show window
of A. 0. Rhodes & Son. S05 Central
avenue, where it Is on exhibition.
TO GOETHALS
DEMOCRATS DO NOT WANT HIM
APPOINTED HEAD OF PAN
AMA GOVERNMENT.
WANT WILSON TO APPOINT
If Col, Goethals is Not Appointed Head
of the Zone Government All Canal
Employes Will Be Placed
Under Civil Service.
Washington, Jan. 2.—Opposition of
democratic senators to President
Taft's plan of putting Col. Geo. W.
Goethals. builder of the Panama
canal, at the head of the eivil govern
ment of I he zone, took such propor
tions today that aorar of Mr. Taft’s
advisers urged ihim to forego the plan
and leave the creation of the zone
government to his successor, Presi
dent-elect Wilson.
Some wtho talked with the presi
dent. early in the day. were convinced
that he would canvuss the situation
further -before abandoning his plan.
Others in close touch with the presi
dent were positive tihat out of con
sideration for Col. Goethals, whom he
does not wish to involve in a politi
cal dispute, he would give up tilie
idea, and that Col. Goethals, immed
iately after appearing before the con
gressional committee formulating ui»
propriatlona tor fortifications of the
canal, would return to his work.
One feature of the plan however,
if Col. Goethals is not put at the head
of Me zone government, is to place
all employes of the canal work under
civil service tty the president’s exe
cutive order. A few employes on the,
isthmus already are in civil service,
but tihe great number of the canal
workers have been appointed by the
isthmian canal commission.
The attitude of the democratic sen
ators is that the present canal com
nii.-aion should not he displaced and
dlsdfgantzed until the carnal is com
pleted.
“The bill autihorizing the president
to organize a civil government for the
canal zone never could have become
a law but for the assurance that tthere
would be no premature action,” said
Senator Hoke Smith of Georgia. “Wo
accepted this assurance as meaning
that the commission would be allow
ed to continue its labors until con
struction should be finished and the
water running.”
The democrats further take the
position Mat the services of all the
members of all the commission are
needed still and tihey contend that
to provide for Col. Goethals and sum
marily dismiss all other commission
ers, would be an unfair discrimina
tion. They express admiration for
Col. Goethals, and Senator Smith
went so far as to say that he would
favor conferring all possible military
honors upon hint.
"But to lift him alone out of the
commission for any purpose and leave
the other commissioners out of con
sideration, and especially to deprive
tihe country of the services of the
commission at wftiat may still be a
critical time, we believe to be neither
wise nor fair, "Mr. Smith continued.
He further said that many of the re
publican senators express this view,
and headed his conviction, that if
Col. Goethal’s nomination should be
sent in, it could not be confirmed at
this time.
BRINGING COLE BACK.
Is Wanted in Mena on Charge of Ac
cepting a Bribe.
Atlanta, Ga.. Jan. 2.—M. W. Cole,
former chief of police of l-awrenee
vn.e, Ga., who is wanted at Mena,
Ark., to face charges of accepting a
bribe, and permitting a murderer sus
pect to escape, passed through here
tonight in custody of Deputy Sheriff
Hungat, enroute for the Arkansas
town.
Charges against Cole resulted from
the disappearance of Vade Higgins,
arrested in Arkansas in connection
with the killing of Wm. McClung in
Gwynnett county, Ga., 14 years ago.
Higgins was being brought to Georgia
by Cole.
_
NOMINATION BALLOT |
COUNTING ONE VOTE.
For Miss or Mrs.....
Address ..s.
In The SENTINEL-RECORD PIANO CONTEST, subject to
conditions governing contest.
Ballots to be counted must be separated, carefully trlmmeo
around border and deposited unfolded.
Use this ballot to vote for yourself or a friend In the Piano
Contest.
THIS BALLOT WILL BE VOID AT 4p.m.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 4.
=- ... . .. L.-.-.-.e.. n .

xml | txt