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The Sentinel=record. (Hot Springs, Ark.) 1900-current, March 14, 1913, Image 1

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Ail ,1 r> « » t THE 0NLY NEWSPAPER IN HOT SPRINGS THAT RECEIVES THE FULL ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORT OVER LEASED WIRES tltod Friday with a cold
All the KAal M ’ WAVE: SATURDAY GENERALLY
XI C *V a ~ 1 :-' ■ ='■■':. ''. 1 .. .. .------. ■ '■ •••-••■ -.- --- -■ I FAIR AND COLD.
"—' " ' ■» VOLUME XXXII. HOT SPRIjMGS, ARK., FRIDAY, MARCH 14. 1913. NO. 136. f
STORM SWEPT
DESTRUCTIVE CYCLONE AND
RAIN STORM VISITS SEVERAL
SOUTHERN STATES.
MANY ARE REPORTED BEAD
Texas, Louisiana and Alabama Seem
to Have Been Heaviest Sufferers
—Property Damage Will Be
Heavy,
Thirty-five persons are reporter! to
have been killed and property valued
at several hundred thousand dollar!
was destroyed by a wind and rain
storm accompanied by lighting which
swept portions of latuisiana, Texas.
Alabama. Mississippi and Tennessee
yesterday. The deluge of rain ex
tended over a more extensive area
and practically demoralized telegraph
and telephone service for several
hours.
The dead:
THOMAS GOODMA.x AND CHILD,
Many, lat.
CHILD of Bud Manaaco, Many. Ijj.
UNKNOWN NEGRO ROY, Proven
cal, La.
JAS. HARALSON, Duke, Ala.
UNKNOWN NEGRO, Brookeland,
Texas.
GEORGE WILLIAMSON, Pleasant
Grove, Tenn.
THREE MEN, (names not given),
Pleasant Grove. Tenn.
HENRY STANLEY, Middleton,
Tenn. ,
lOS. WALDROP, Middleton Tenn
J. E McMAHON. McNairy county,
Tenn. W
Missing:
MRS BURT COX, McNairy county.
Ten u.
CHILD of B. Johnson, Duke. Ala.
WHITE CHILD, unidentified, Lex
ington. Tenn,
NEGRO unidentified, Lexington.
Tenn.
THREE CHILDREN of Hubert
Brown, Hiding Tenn.
K. W. HART, Potts Camp, Miss,
en. Miss.
TWO PERSONS, unidentified, Beld
lug, Miss.
TWO PERSONS unidentified, Tis
homingo. Miss.
TWO PERSONS, unidentified, Al
goma. Miss.
Those killed at Pleasant Grove,
Maury county, were:
CHA8. WILLIAMSON. a prominent
far uier.
MRS. T. H PEEBLES, Campbells
vllle.
J. O, LAM h it Lutnsden store.
MAT BALLANFANT and several
others were Injured.
Greatest property damage and loss
of life was reported in Provencal and
Many. I/a. The town of Provencal
practically was wiped out, many build
lugs were blown down. Only meagre
reports have as yet been received.
Property damage st Brookeland,
Texas, near the Louisiana border was
estimated at $100,000. While only one
person was reported hilled at that
point many were seriously injured.
Reports from Gadsden. Aia.. told of
one death, one person missing and
destruction of property in Rtowah uud
Calhoun counties. All wires in the
path of the storm.were blown down
or put out of commission by lightning.
Pleasant Grove, Maury county,
Tenn., was struck by the storm and
it is thought the death list will
amount to four persona at thut place.
Lexington and Camden, Tenn., are
said to have suffered damage, al
though no loss of life lias been re
ported.
in Mississippi some damage to prop
erty was reported between Tupelo.
Corinth, Saltillo ami Ountown.
Beaumont. Tex., March 13.- A cy
clone this morning did $100,000 dam
age at Brookeland and injured a num
ber of citlxens of that place. The cy
clone struck the southern edge of
the town, completely demolishing
three residences in that section.
'Brookeland is about 100 miles north
of Beauinout on the Santa Ke.
One negro. Peter Pipkin, a section
hand, was killed and Olyn Jesse and
Warran Samuels and the six-year-old
blld of Warren Samuels were ser
iously injured. Collins Stevens, a
railroad employe was Injured about
the head.
Indefinite reports received here
• oming to 'Beaumont from Brookeland
are to the effect that many citizens
were injured. The majority of these
were taken to the hospital at Temple.
Reports received here Indicate that
the occupants of three small residen
ces destroyed have not been account
ed for.
In addition to these residences the
first, 'Baptist church, the business
1 lace of the Sabine Mercantile com
pany, both frame .rtru.-tores, were
blown down.
The Commercial hotel was twisted
a-ound a full six feet out of plumb
»ilh the street.
A pine and oak grove of 25 acres,
was swept clean ami telephone and
telegraph wires were cut down for a
radius of half a mile of the stricken
section.
At Provencal. La., the dead are:
ISIDORE JORDAN.
ELEVEN YEAR DAUGHTER of Brew
ster 'Wilkinson.
The seriously injured are:
BREWSTER WILKINSON.
I)R. W. E. ADDISON and wife.
MRS. JANE DENNISON and infant.
MRS. FRANCIS KELLOGG, mother
of Mrs. Dennison.
ED. SANDERS.
REV. A. W. NBWSON, pastor Meth
odist church.
WM. RICHARD.
MRS. BARNEY BATES.
MRS. JANE BENNETT.
At Fisher, La., the dead:
MRS. OLIVER IRVINGTON and
baby.
Seriously injured:
J. M. SAVA LAND and wife.
A SON of Lee Hightower.
I -
Injured Taken to Temple.
Temple, Tex., March 13.—Tbe San
ta Fe railroad has ordered ambulances
to meet the early morning passenger
train on that road from the south.
No details are given but It is supposed
|the train carries persons injured In
the cyclone at .Brookeland.
Death In Storm's Wake.
New Orleans. March 13.—Accord
ing to Reports reaching here late to
day, threfe persons were killed in a
cyclone which struck Mary, La., this
afternoon. Several were, reported In
jured. Thomas Goodman and his
baby were killed when their home
was blown away. One child of Hud
Manzsco was killed and several mem
bers of the family Injured when their
home was demolished.
A high wind which struck New Or
leans about noon caused much small
property damage and a boy Paul Tar
anek, was struck by falling glass and
badly cut. He was crossing a street
when a pane of glass from the win
dow of a ten story building fell on
hint.
A frame building in the course of j
construction was blown down.
A dispatch from Meridian, Miss., to
night says railroad reports received
'there are that Saltillo and Guntown,
in Lee county, Miss., were struck by
a cyclone today. Several persons are
ro|H>rted injured.
- I
Storm Strikes Alabama.
Gadsden, AAla.. Mart It 13.—One
persou is known to oe dead, another
is missing and many persons were in
jured in a severe wind and rain storm i
which swept Etowah an<| Calhoun
counties today; • j
James Caralsou, aged 75, was killed
and five teen injured when the store
of W. P. Duke at Duke, Ala., was de
molished. The home of B. Johnson,
one mile from Duke, also was blown
down and one of his ten children is
missing Practically all wires In the
path of the storm were blown down
and estimates of the damage are not
available
Deathe in Tennessee.
Nashville, Term., March 13.—A cy
clone struck Pleasant Grove, Maury
county, about I o'clock this afternoon
demolishing practically every house
in the place and, according to meagre
telephone reports, killing three or
four men. Vinong those killed was
Geo. Williamson, a prominent, farmer.
(Smith Brothers general store was
< onipletety destroyed. The Louift
ville and Nashville depot, was blown
Into shreds, but a number of passen
gers at the depot at the time waiting
for a train were uninjured. A train
was lost on the Duck Kiver branch of
the Nashville. Chattanooga arm St.
Louis and so far efforts to locate it
have been unsuccessful, as all wires
are down. All creeks are out of t.helr
hanks, telegraph and telephone wires
are down, and much damage to prop
erty done.
Passengers on incoming trains re
port that the cyclone struck Lexing
ton. Term., about 2:30, destroying the
Scott hotel, damaging the court house
and demolishing about 15 residences.
At a point below Lexington, a Nash
ville, Chattanooga and St. Louis rail
road station was moved from one side
of the track to the other. Traffic was
uninterrupted. %
A cyclone is also reported to have
struck Camden. Benton county, but
the damage has not been learned. A
general rain and wind storm swept 11
middle Tennessee today.
Five Killed at Atlanta.
Atlanta, Ga.. March 13.—Five per
sons were killed ink a devastating
storm which swept suburban Atlanta
and contiguous territory tonight.
The dead:
WILLIAM BANK'S and child. Clark
son. Ga. „ „ ,
C.VKXOKN NBCmBSS, Tucker, (.a.
MRS. SALLIE NASH and . child,
Tucker, Ga.
•Tire effect of the cyclone was sud
den and violent. Its path was less
than a hundred feet wide Many
buildings In tire path of the storm
were demolished.
PORFIRO DIAZ REFUSES.
Naples, March 13.—Gen. Diaz has
beeu the recipient of nian^ messages
from his friends urging hi# to return
to Mexico and resume the leadership
there, but the ex-president steadfast
ly has refused, saying that nothing
except danger to the Independence of
his country would induce him to In
terfere.
In a f£w days Gen Diaz will go to
Rome and thank King Victor Em
manuel for the Italian decoration con
ferred upon him. The ex-presideut
later will go to Nice, where he Intends
to spend some time resting.
WILL BE THE WORLD’S BIGGEST BATTLESHIP
' TTumWWT.1mtiu »
3> a.'Ymn* n.wia VjflfoFbjj
This Is the navy department's official sketch of the battleship Pennsylvania, which will be larger than any other
warship ever built by any nation. Its tonnage will be 31,000. its length 600 feet and Its beam 97 feet, which is
almost the limit for safe passage through the Panama canal locks. The total cost of the Pennsylvania ready for
service will be about $!4,000,000.
REBELS WIN
HARD FIGHT
«
THE FEDERAL GARRISON AT NO
GALES, SONORA. SURRENDERS
AFTER ALL DAY FIGHT.
SEVERAL AMERICANS INJURED
Dead and Wounded are Left in the
Sun All Day Without Attention—
Red Cross Workers Are Refus
ed Passage Through Lines.
Nogales, Ariz., March 13.—Consti
tutionalists overthrow the federal
gariison at Nogalesf, Sonora today
«oa now are in the 1Vssosston of Iflie
border town, after a fight which
tinned with little abatement for 12
hours. Gas u I ties are estimated at
inti dead and twice «s many wound
ed on both sides, tnough accurate
count lias not been made.
private Allen A. Umfleet, troop
G, Flftth cavalry, V. 8. A. was ser
iously wounded by a rebel bullet
v bile doing police duty near the in
ternational line here. The shot pis#
ed through his face from nose to ear.
the United (States soldier was saot
when tiie attack was at its height
Lieut. Col. Tate, in euarge of the.
Fifth cavalry patrol, at once sent
word to Gen. O. Bregon, in command
of the rebel forces:
^ ou have idiot one of my men.
Cease firing, or 1 shall be after you
ut once.” , |,
At the same moment the firing
from tiie regulars under Generals'
Kosterlltzkfc' and Keyes slackened.
By some preconcerted arrangement
f.ieirt. Col. Tate ordered his bugler
to sound the Mexican "cease firing**
order. The federal garrison Instant
ly obeyed but desultory firing con
tinued.
Col. Obregou succeeded in holding
back the fire from his men so fihat
Col. Kosterlltfcky and Col. Reyes,
with their forces were able .t-j cross
to the Xlnited .States where they sur
rendered to Col. Wilbur E. Wilder,
Fifth cavalry ,who arrived too late to
take command of 'the Ameicau troops.
The Mexican federal soldiers stacked
tlheir arms before the Americans dis
banded them.
'During the conflict several persons
on the American side of the border
were wounded.
American troops were rushed here
from Fort Huachaca Ariz., and to
night GOO troopers of the Fifth cav
alry are doing duty along tihe border,
Despite protests from I.ieut. Col.
Tate and Consul Slmplieh, many bul
lets struck on the American side
throughout the day, The renewed
attack late in the afternoon increased
tihe danger to residents of the Ari
zona town.
Three non combatants were
wounded here while two American
women had narrow escapes from in
jury, one bullet even piercing a wo
man's skull while on the porch of her
home. The killed or wounded in the
day's battle could not be estimated.
Twenty injured frohi botfh sidels
were brought, to hospitals here, but
an American physician, who braved
the firing line, reported many more
wounded who could not he reached
without danger to tftm rescuers.
American residents here quickly
gave their services as Red Cross vol
unteers.
Nogales is set. in an ideal (tositlon
for defense, between two ranges o{
hills running parallel north and
south. The state troops were com
pelled to move through this moun
tainous lane and were mowed dbwn
by the fire of tihe federals' rifles and
machine guns On the plains be
tween the 'hills the attackers eiwr
cealed themselves in shallow niches
caused by the mountain freshets.
•Here men dead or wounded lay In
Mie sun without attention. Twice dur.
ing the day, <Jen. Obregon failed In
stubborn attacks cn the defenders.
At 5:20 o'clock the third attempt
was made to assault the federal ,io
s’Won. This was more successful,
the defenders deserting the right
front and extreme left trenches nnd
fleeing to the cover of tllie towns.
This increased the hot fire on the
American side and when a ro|>ort
reached Col. Tale that one of hi«
iroopers had been wounded he (hasti
ly assembled his men.
The American Red Cross workers
were refused passage through the
'ederal tines and the- American cck
lier^ had difficulty in clearing the
streets of speetato.v
Carrauza Rebels Active.
Laredo, Tex., Mardi 13.—Three
bridges were dynamited and tele
graph lines cut early today just as
preparations had been made to open
•ailroad and telegraphic communica
tion from this point to the Mexican
tapital.
Caarran/A rebels are said to be re
sponsible for the damage wrought, mr
there is a shortage of repair material
st Nuevo Laredo, it cannot be defl
aitely stated when the traffic can be
•eopened.
A battle readied lietween federals
ind Ourranza/slas at Herroa between
Monterey and Mataraor: resulting in
lie killing of five ami thy wounding
yf many others. -
OXFORD CRtW WINS
CLASSIC BOAT RACE
COME FROM BEHIND IN LAST
FEW YARDS OF GREAT CON
TEST AND WON RACE.
Putney, Eng.. March 13.—Oxford to
day won the annual eight oared boat
race from the light blues almost at
the finishing post. The Cambridge
men led for more than four miles of
the four and a quarter mile course
and finished less than a quarter
length behind their opponents. The
w®ners time was 20 minutes, 53 sec
onus.
The light blues appeared to have
the race al their mercy almost at the
last minute. Then the weight and
stamina of the Oxford oarsmen were
exerted mightily. After a stern chase
all the way to Barnes Bridge, a qtiar-1
ter mile from the finish, the dark
blues made a wonderful spurt and In
the most exciting finish witnessed in
20 years breasted their rivals a few
lengths from home and then with a
final effort pushed the nose of their
shell in front with the last lew
strokes.
Cambridge won the toss and ob
tained all the advantage of weather
anil station. As the starting pistol
was fired at 4:38, they took the lead,
setting a stroke of $6 against the dark
blues, 34.
The light blues gained half a length
in the first three minutes of the race.
Their smarter strokes drew the new
style center-seated shell further and’
further ahead of there rivals until
Hammersmith bridge, the half way
point, was reached.
Then Oxford spurted and their ef-‘
forts perceptibly reduced the advan
tage of the light blues. But Cam
bridge gallantly responded. Bund
ing Chiswick Mall the light blues had ;
the advantage of a shorter curve amt '
they promptly put daylight between
themselves and the dark blueB.
Settling down to a stroke of 34.
the light blues were regarded as cer
tain winners.
Cambridge shot by Barnes Bridge
a fell length to the good. Horfall, the
Oxford stroke, again called on bis
crew whipping up the stroke to 36.
Foot by foot he crept upon the lead
ers. The light blues, who had been
compelled by illness and accidents to
carry two half trained men in thpl?
boat, were unequal to the final spurt,
which would have meant victory.
BANK ROBBERS CONVICTED.
Huntsville. Ark.. March 13.—Plead
ing . guilty to robbing the First Na
tional Bank of Huntsville, of seven
thousand dollars a year ago, Thomas
Hayden an(| Chas. Myers were sen
tenced here today to serve seven arid
ten years, respectively. The men are
also charged with the robbery of a
passenger train of the Kansas City
Southern near Poteau, Oklahoma, last
October.
% \ . - ■
PROMISES
AN ELECTION
I
— ..
ACTING GOV. OLDHAM MAKES
ADDRESS TO SENATE TO AP
PEASE PUBLIC WRATH.
____________ •
SENATOR WASSON RETURNS
President Futrell of the Senate An
nounces That He Will Make a
Determined Fight to Take
Governor's Office.
-,
Making a feeble promise that "when
things set Med down" be would isaue
a can for a special election, Acting
Governor Oldham, jbrother-in-law of
Governor Robinson, made an address
to the state senate yesterday in which
he In a measure seemed to try to ap
pease the public indignation over the
arbitrary measure lu which he is hold
ing the office of chief executive or
the state.
President Futrell of the state sen
ate. who by virtue of the constitution
is entitled to hold the office of gov
ernor until a special election is called
and the people have t|u> right, to
nominated and elect a governor, also
made a statement in which he declar
ed that he would fight in the courts
for the office.
State Senator Wasson returned yes
terday afternoon from Little Rock
and stated that there was much ex
citement attendant upon the closing
hours of the legislative session in
both the senate and the house.
From tile sentiment expressed
about tlie state capital the promise
made by Acting Governor Oldham to
call a special election wIhui the con
ations had settled, was dot taken
with good grace. There were open
expressions that this was merely a
bold movement to hold the office in
the hope that there would not have
been any question but that the presi
dent. of the senate elected in its clos
ing hours could serve as "governor,
pending such time as a special elec
tion might give the people the right
to name'a governor of their own
choosing.
The big surprise to the public of
the situation is tiiat Attorney Gen
eral Moose has rendered an opinion
that Oldham may hold the office in
stead of Futrell, and this carries with
ft the imputation that it is not man
datory on Oldham to call a special
election, for there is no process of
law by which Oldham can be forced
to perform an act even though the
statute plainly provides that he
■’shall" perform it.
By the Associated Press.
Little Rock, Ark.. March 13.—State
Senator Win. K. Oldham and Sena
tor John 51. Futrell. each claiming to
he governor of Arkansas and with
each maintaining an office in the
state capital, the affairs of the state
are in a tangle which apparently only
the courts can unravel.
Senator Oldham has an apparent
advantage In that he is in possession
of the governor’s office and is hack
ed by an opinion by Attorney General
Mpose that he is the legal governor.
As spoil as the legislature adjourn
ed at noon, Senator Futrell appeared
in the governor’s office and demand
ed possession. This wag refused by
Senator Oldham and Senator Futrell
then established his office as gover
nor. in the office of the president or
the senate. He announced that he
would at once institute legal proceed
ings to oust Senator Oldham,
j Senator Futrell said he would at
once call a special election to select
his successor. Senator Oidhum said
he would call a special election ‘‘as
soon as things get quieted down a
little."
The situation is caused by the ac
tion of Gov. Joe T. Rohiaon in hastily
resigning Saturday, after which he
hastened to Washington and was
.worn In a* United State* senator,
eavlng liis brother-in-law. Senator
Dldham in possession of the gover
inr’s office.
The constitution provides that In
rase of the resignation of the gov
ernor the president of the senate,
shall become acting governor and if
he vacancy occurs more than one
years from the expiration of the term,
.hall immediately call a special elec
tion to choose a governor.
it is the custom of the senate be
fore adjourning to elect a president
protein, who shall act as ex-officio
lieutenant governor during the suc
ceeding two years, in accordance
with tills custom, tlie senate on Mon
day elected Senator Kutrcll, president
protem.
He maintains that as he Is now
president of the senate, he is there
fore acting governor. Senator Old
ham asserts that he was president of
the senate when the vacancy in the
governor’s office occurred and flint
therefore lie became governor immed
iately upon (!ov. Robinson's resigna
tion. The fact that his successor as
president of the senate has been
chosen, lie maintains, has no hearing
r>n the matter. In this contention he
is upheld 'by the attorney general who
advised all the other state officials
to recognize Senator Oldhaui as gov
ernor.
WOULD BAR NEW DANCES.
Austin, Tex., March 13.—Represen
tative Ussery announced today he
lias drafted a bill which he will sub
mit to the legislature making it a
misdemeanor to dance the “turkey
trot," the “bunnybug" die “grizzly
bear” the “Texas Tommy,” and other
dances of a like nature in Texas. The
dances are classed in the proposed
bill as “obscene and eccentric" and
the penalty for Indulging in them is
made from ten to two hundred dol
lars fine.
ALABAMA OFFICIAL
SHORT IN ACCOUNTS
REWARD HAS BEEN OFFERED
FOR THEODORE LACY, CLERK
OF CONVICT DEPARTMENT,
Montgomery, Ala., March 12.—Theo
dore Lacy, chief clerk of the state
convict department and custodian of
all its funds, has disappeared with
bis accounts, about. $ijo,utK» out ol
balance and with moneys estimated at
from $2.1,WO and $30,u(t0 In Ills pos
session.
Discrepancies in the accounts date
■back to June, 1011; the cash carried
with him was obtained from local
banks on checks signed by James
Ooakeley, president of the (depart
ment.
A warrant for Lacy’s arrest has
been issued and a reward of $1,000
offered by Gov. O’Neal. The missing
official was last seen In Montgomery
Wednesday afternoon soon after he
had turned over two checks, alleged
to be worthless and amounting to
$117,000, to Dan O. Tara wick, first
assistant clerk' to the convict depart
ment.
Sufficient proof of the shortage was
obtained Thursday morning by state
Examiner Brooke, when deposit books
were taken from Lacy’s desk.
The first direct evidence of discre
pancies was found Wednesikiy when
the records of the chief clerk failed
to show duplicates of cotton bills
amounting to more than $39,000.
With his records failing to tally
with those of the state's cotton mill
at Spelgner, the examiner yesterday
requested Lacy to produce his deposit
book. This was not done and the
examiner reported the mutter to
President Oakley this morning. The
governor was informed of the short
age shortly after its discovery and
warrants were immediately issued
Lacy was not under bond.
GERMANY HAS A
MONEY STRINGENCY
MONEY MARKET IS TIGHT OES
PITE FAVORABLE INFLUEN
CES AND RATES HIGH.
'Berlin. March 13.- -Stringency in
the money market shows uo signs of
abatement, despite a number of favor
able outside influences. Conditions
are sharpening every day. Predic
tions that borrowers would be forced
to pay from 8 to 8% percent for
money for the monthly settlement and
the exaggerated reports of the high
rules that Germany was offering for
gold in New York more than discount
ed yesterday's announcement of the
Austro-Russian demobilization and ac
celerated an unloading movement, un
der which everything dropped a point
or more. Cstiadian Pacific shares fell
3 points. The report of the engage
ment of $5,000,000 in gold from New
York was not confined. The German
imperial bauk. issued an interim state
ment today showing a slight improve
ment of March 11, over the statement
of March 7. Including a $5,000,000 in
crease in the' stock of gold and silver,
but the better showing is attributed
largely to the accumulations for the
subscriptions to the new loans pay
able March 26. Hoarding of money
by tile German public and a difficulty
In making commercial collections are
generally noted.
London. March 13.—Bullion amount
ing to 13,000 pounds sterling was tak
en into the Bank of ftigland on bal
ance todfty.
POLITICAL
PATRONAGE
WHICH HAS BEEN VEXING WIL
SON ADMINISTRATION HAS
FOUND A SOLUTION.
GIVE 35,000 POSTMASTERSHIP
Leaders and National Committee Will
Submit Patronage Plan to Presi
dent Wilson for His Early
Approval.
Washington. March 13.—President
Wilson's advisors have hit upon solu
tions of two of the political problems
confronting the administration which
promised to tie most troublesome—
what hind of democrats shall get
plums from the political tree and how
thousands of democrats can he given
a chance to get near the tree.
Within the next few days Post mast
er General Burleson is expected to
present for the president's considera
tion a plan which will be open to
(jemocrats the 35,000 third and fourth
class pontniasterahips, placed under
civil service recently by Mr. Taft. Mr.
Burleson said tonight he had not yet
decided whether to ask the presb
dent for a revocation of this order.
If he decides against it lie will sug
gest that iiostmasters wno benefited
by the Taft order be required to pass
a merit system teat open to all.
If the president took the first
course, thousands of postniastersliips
would be available at once and If he
chose the other, democrats who
tered the merit competition would
have as good a chance as republican
incumbents.
Mr. Burleson nud Chairman Mc
Combs of the national democratic
committee have settled upon a plan
for patronage in the distribution,
which also will lie submitted to the
president shortly. If it is followed,
the question of whether a candidate
for office is backed by “organization’’
men or “anti-organization” men will
not figure. The president will be ad
vised to go upon the principle that
any man who subscribes to the demo
cratic platform and shows his belief
in democratic, principles is politically
fit for office. Personal fitness, of
course, will be considered. This dis
position has been shown in the first
batch of presidential appointments.
Some of the most prominent men
whom the president has thus far nam
ed, opposed his nomination at Balti
more.
Democrats In Control.
The democratic forces took charge
of the United States senate today,
elected new officers to preside over
that body aud paved tile way for re
organization of committees and a new
control- of legislative affairs. Anoth
er session of the democratic “steer
ing committee" brought the commit
tee lists near to completion. It was
expected a democratic caucus 'tomor
row would prepare al! committees for
presentation to the senate Saturday.
The personanel of the finapee com
mittee became definitely known to
night. As now agreed upon, it is;
“Democrats — Chairman Simmons,
(North Carolina); Stone, Williams,
Johnson, Shively, Penrose, George,
Thomas. (Colorado); Janies, (Ken
tucky), Hughes.
Republicans—Penrose. Iaidge. Me
Ouraber, Smoot. Galliuger, Clark
(Wyoming •: 1-aFollette.
It was on high authority tonight
that Senator Tillman had won his
fight for chairmanship of the appro
priations committee.
Senator Owen has been selected
for chairmanship of the bunking and
currency committee. (Senator O’Gor
man probably will be made chairman
of tiie committee on inter-oceanic
canals.
The senate elected Senator Clarke
of Arkansas, president protein poro to
day and chose other officers as fol
lows :
James M. Maker, South Carolina,
Secretary: Chas. P. Higgins. Missouri,
sergeant-at-arms; Forest J. Pretty,
man, Washington, I). C„ Chaplain;
Thomas W. Keller, West Virginia. As
sistant Doorkeeper, Cart A. l-effler,
Penn., {acting assistant doorkeeper.
Senator Core objected to the elec
tion of the latter who was named by
the republicans as their confidential
employe on the floor. He declared a
senate page had told him that Mr.
Loeffier was res|H>nsible t'or the dis
appearance of the sa-calted Holst law
certificate of deposit which figured
prominently in the first trial of Sen
ate Lurimer. Republicans warmly de
fended their sole employe and de
clared the charge was a "gross injus
tice” to Mr. I Aieffler.
He was e-elected with the support
of a majority of the democrats and an
Investigation of tb'- whole affairs was
ordered. The senate committee on
privileges and elections will conduct
the Investigation.

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