OCR Interpretation


The courier-index. (Marianna, Ark.) 1917-current, October 19, 1917, Image 4

Image and text provided by Arkansas State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89051338/1917-10-19/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

The New 1918 I
Maxwell 1
Gives you all the room—all the com- v\
«• fort all the conveniences and beauty ob- ; 1
tamable m any car selling at $1200. |fj
And yet the operating economy ' the i 1
mveUniral reliability—the ease of hand- I f
ling and the wonderful power that have ^
producd such marvelous road and econ- | |
omy records m every section of the world |xj
are not only maintained—but augmented. ^
i* YOU can SEE the VALUE in the MAX
I WELL at $745. I
I i
T-«-C-*74S |
“r -j-974St Cmmpm 910*3/ BmrSnm 910* St Z
MmIINI. Allprie^ f. •. 9. Datrwdt Z
i I
'
Z FOR SALE BY W. S. ATKINS Z
p PHONE 99 p
o—o-o-o-0-C--0
I I
• TOPICS IN BRIEF o
i
-o—o-o-o-o-o
It will be an open winter for
peace talk.—Boston Herald.
You couldn't convince Private
Gould and Colonel Vanderbilt that
this isn’t a rich man's war.—Boston
Transcript.
Also, getting the I. W. W.’s to
work may be classed as one of the
highest triumphs of German efficien
cy and diplomacy. — Indianapolis
News.
Maxmillian Harden approves the
Kaiser’s answer to the Pope. Max
is evidently getting tired of staying
in jail so long and so often.—Chicago
Herald.
According to some politicians. Sen
ator La Follette is getting ready for
the next Presidential campaign, when
bis helmet will be in the ring.—
Boston Transcript.
He who attempts to drive a wedge
between the kaiser and his people
bites on granits.—President Kaempff,
of the German Reichstag Another
rat nipped in the bud.^—New York
Bun.
Most folks would regard the state
ment that they are capable of gov
erning themselves as a compliment,
but the Germans are said to look
upon it as an insult—Macon Tele
graph.
’Our reptiles are a national asset,
worth many millions," announces the
American Forrestry Association. Still
we insist that they be interned for
the duration of the war.—Boston
Transcript.
There are only one hundred rifles
at Camp Funston to supply the
twenty thousand men there. But
perhaps it is the intention to have
our troops capture their rifles from
the enemy.—Kansas City Times.
Everything is being conserved
these days—except life.—Chicago
News.
The British slogan is “Carry On ”
The German, “Carry Off.”—Brook
lyn Eagle.
The Liberty Bond goes up—with
the kaiser on the other end of the
seesaw.—Boston Transcript.
The kaiser finds it a whole lot
easier to make a general a prince
than it is to make a prince a gen
eral.—Boston Transcript.
It is hard to explain these strate
gically profitless air-raids on England
except by Prussia’s need of self
expression.—Boston Herald.
In suggesting that we send La
Follette to the Reichstag T. R. for
gets that we have no quarrel with
the German people.—Boston Tran
script.
If our persecution of the I. W. W.
is carried much further we fear that
Austria will declare war in defense
of her nationals —Boston Transcript.
Colonel House at the head of a
j “peace bureau” at least indicates
! that if the administration desires
peace it does not propose to go after
it with a brass band.—New York Sun.
COMMISSIONER’S SALE LEVEE LANDS
Notice Is hereby given that the undersigned, as Commissioner of the
Lee Chancery Court, in the case of Board of Directors St. Francis Levee
District v*. Joe Hale and certain lands, will, under and in pursuance of the
Decree rendered in said cause, at the July Term, 1917, proceed to sell the
following lands for the purpose of enforcing the collection of the delinquent
levee taxes against the same at the Court House in the City of Marianna,
Arkansas, on
MONDAY. OCTOBER 22, 1917
within the hours of judicial sales, and if the said sale is not completed on
that day. will continue from day to day until all the following tracts are
•old:
Taxes.
penalty
Owner Description Sec. Acres and costs
TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST
J. O. Hale W of R SWT-4 3 68 »6 50
TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST
J. b. Daggett B of L NW 1-4 3 13 3.67
Same B of L all E 1-2 4 126 6 24
Same B of L N 1-2 SW' 1-4 4 27 3.69
TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH. RANGE 3 EASl' \
H. F. Hudson Strip off N side SW1-4 SE1-4 4 12 3 62
Wm Alexander All in Diet. El-2 SE1-4 4 52 5 68
lad A Ark. Lbr. Co. Wl-2 SWT-4 12 80 11.24
TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH. RANGE 4 EAST
T. Helce 8 of R SW 1-4 17 25 4.92
'rnm’WouiD o v/adtu d t vr’C r P j CT
Unknown Frl. El-2 15 24 6 0S
TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH. RANGE 3 EAST
L. M Ealy Frl. Sl-2 SW1-4 6 77 4.97
Unknown tri. E Pt. NW1-4 18 22 5.2f
J. E Norfleet NE1-4 NE1-4 19 40 7.12
Same SW1-4 NW1-4 20 40 6 0S
Some Nl-2 NW1-4 20 80 9.1*
Unknown Frl. NE1-4 NW 1-4 23 27 5.7*
J. K. Fekoo Wl-2 NE1-4 33 80 9.1*
TOWNSHIP 3 NORTH. RANGE 4 EAST
R Sales N of R NW1-4 2 77 14 8S
'iOWNSHIP 3 NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST
B. W. Jackson Est. Frl. El-4 SW1-4 27 36 7.51
Same Nl-2 SE1-4 NW14 27 » 5.57
Same Sl-2 SW1-4 NW1-4 21 20 5.57
Morris Lesser All S of B El-2 SE1-4 29 lx 4.42
M. K. Koleeon El-2 NE1-4 36 #0 13.3C
The terms of sale will be for cash to the highest and best bidder.
Witness my hand this 24th day of September, 1917.
474} it. G. APPLE, Commissioner.
EVENING GOWNS
ACCEPT THE REIGN
OF SIMPLICITY
New York, Oct. 6.—The question of
evening dress, the “to be or not to
be’’ of the decollete, seems to have
been decided. The optimistic spirit
of America has prevailed, and while
there is not the same georgeous dis
play as in the past, evening clothes
are worn, and rarely beautiful ones
at that. Tt President of the United
States paid a visit to New York not
long ago. and together with Mrs Wil
son. passed an evening at one of the
most enjoyable plays of the season.
Of course, the house was wildly en
thusiastic; is was some time before
the play could begin, and even then
the audience pain more attention to
the official box-party than to the
play. Mrs. Wilson was very simply
dressed, but she seemed immensely
interested in bustle dresses on ibe
stage and the costumes smttend
everywhere ovei the bouse
A Victory on Empire Lines
Picturesque, indeed are the compro
mises effected by fashion. The dress
es are in the same wonderful tints
and colors that nave always been
favorites, perhaps though a tnfie
subdued. Some are hirrh in the back
square or round in front, with long
J sleeves of tulle or *ery short ones
of the same material as the bodice or
the overskirt. The waist that is cut
, st'a'ght airo.-s f om sh raidei to
1 >- loulder is v<Ty popular this vear,
I fan it gives • !'* effect of a higher
' I'C.'k
Simplicity and Lack of Trimming
There is very little trimming on
| the new models. They seem to rely
to a great exent on their line and
i color, and charming indeed is the
: result. One of the most attractive of
the new modes in evening gowns is
illustrated here. It is of rose-colored
satin, bodice and skirt, with a filmy
overskirt or tunic of soft mist-gray
chiffon, stitched on the lower edge
with rose-colored silk in the long
loose stitch which makes such a
fascinating trimming. The collar and
the short sleeves of the chiffon are
stitched in the same manner.
Good Taste in Slippers
Just a word here about the slippers
for evening, and the difference be
tween those in good taste and those
that are just a trifle too ornate and
overtrimmtd. “Life” has invented a
new word, the verb “to hoove," mean
ing to conserve, and it is now being
widely applied. One must “hoove"
one’s food of course, and equally of
course, one must ‘‘hoove" one's trim
ESTES W. MANN
ARCHITECT
Plans, Specifications and
Superintendence
Bank of Marianna Bldg.
Marianna, Ark.
.i
mings on every article of one's dress.
Slippers that are good form are very
plain, indeed. The long vamp is still
with us; heels do not seem to be
quite so high as formerly, for they,
too, have been hooved. Satin, the
same color as the dress, is the first
choice. A rhinestone buckle placed,
high on the slipper is very fashion
able. Then one of the latest ideas in
slipper decoration is a tiny bow of
satin, a single bow of ribbon a
quarter of an inch wide, perhaps
Many of the fall brides have chosen
this for their wedding slippers. It
gives the foot the long, narrow effect
that is so distinctive. Slippers of
brocade, of metal cloth, or of combi
nations of plain and figured materials
are worn only on the most formal
occasions. Indeed, the all black or
all white slipper is always appropri
ate and in good taste. Stockings
must, of course, match the costume
and the slipper.
---o
HILLER LUMBER COMPANY
cuke the lowest pries.
0 -o-O-0 —■ —0-0-o-o
1 i
0 CHURCHES o
1 I
0 -o-0-0-o-0-0-o
ST. ANDREW S CHURCH
The Rev. C. C. Burke, Rector.
SUNDAY
Hoi. Communion .—.7.00 a.m.
Sunday School. 9:30 a.m.
Bible Class .10:00 a.m.
Morning Prayer . 11:00 a.m.
Evening Prayer.7:45 p. m.
WEDNESDAY
Litany .10:00 a.m.
THURSDAY
Holy Cnmunion .7:00 a.m.
FRIDAY
Litany. Praver for the Peace
of the World..7:30 p. m.
-o
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
October 21. Subject: “Doctrine of
Atonement.” Golden Text: Hebrew
10:22. “Let us draw near with a
true heart in full assurance of faith;
having our heart sprinkled om in
evil conscience.’’
-o-—
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Sunday schiol 9:45 a. m. Let us
carry on the fine enthusiasm of last
Sunday’s Rally Day exercise. We
had a beautiful program in which all
classes took part and a splendid of
fering for Sabbath school extension.
The work of Mr. C. H. McKee’s
bible class was beautifully repre
sented by Hon. Davis Plummer. The
Woman's Bible Cless meets next
Monday afternoon at three thirty
o’clock. Lesson Job first three chap
ters. A class for the study of the
bible by books. Open to all. Start
at the beginning.
Mr. T. D. Welds and Mr. W. S.
McClintock have been elected to
represent the church at the fall
1 meeting of the Arkansas Presbytery,
which meets at De Vails Bluff on
October 16. Mr. J. B. Grove and
Hon. Ed Robertson were elected J1
attend the meeting of Synod in
vember. R
Prayer meeting as usual
Wednesday evening at 7:30. The«^H
tendance at this service is grottoR
Preaching services both mnnilS
and evening at the usual hour
Morning theme ‘ RememberUH
followed by the Communion senfefl
Special music. Evening theme' “Sgl
mons." What they are for. fljj^B
ions differ. We want to choose o9
ow n sermons. But Cod has His mS
message for every messenger of HkH
Gospel songs and a most cord^B
greeting and fellowship in ail t^B
spcv res. R
Walter K Johnston. Minister fl
THE DEAF SHALL HEAR ■
A negro examined by exemptkfl
board No. 1 tried to fake deafaafl
The doctor whispered to U^B
“One, two, three.” ■
No sign of hearing *
The doctor repeated it. No sgfl
again. P
‘ You know you hear me. mggg.fH
exclaimed the exasperated doctor.®
“No, Ah don't, boss.” blurted ofl
the scared darkey—Tit Bits. ■
DIDN’T KNOW POKER 1
A handsome south Texas editM
made the announcement a few
ago that he was going to write■■
article entitled: “Some Hands®
Have Held.” It was to have
a narrative of his card playing dsji®
But a number of ladies in the toiH
misunderstood him and be got
eral epistles something like th&R
“You had better not tell anything HR
me if you know what is good
A DRIVE ON THE ENEMY B
‘I’ve got to practice on the
for five hours a day.” &
“What for?” , ■
“Cause pa and ma don't liMJ*®
new neighbors."—Bqgton_^r*BK”gR
Wouldn’t You Like to Own T
A Home and Stop Paying Rent? I
Then give some very serious consideration to 1
what we have to offer you. We own a great f
many pieces of property in Marianna—some I
improved, some unimproved. On occount of 1
handling other lines of business we have de- §
rlicnncp nf oil mir rnnorfxr J ' K
I • order to move it in a hurry we are offering IS
I desirable homes, well improved, some with II
I lights, water and sewerage, others accessible I™
I to these conveniences, at very attractive prices
1 and on easy terms. We are offering many ■
1 splendid building lots at equally low prices ft
1 and on easy terms. Consult with us at once I
S if you are m the market for a home or for a ft
1 good lot, either to build upon now or for in
0. C. SUTTON & CO. I

11 Feeding Cottonseed Meal 1
I To Horses and Mules I
Read the FoUowing from the Progressive Farmer: I
jjli In traveling over the south it is gratifying to hear such an in- ||
|l|| creasing number of farmers report that they are feeding two pounds |||
jjli of cottonseed meal a day to eac° horse and mule. This is both econo- ||
Hjl mical and patriotic. It pays the farmer and also serves the nation by jfll
i|jjl releasing corn for human consumption. On this point some agricul- j||
j||| tural organizations of the south have printed and circulated thousands ||
lift of copies of the following statement by Dr. Tait Butler: l|
Ill “There are in the eleven cotton states 6,500,000 horses and mules. fj|
|| If each of these were fed two pounds of cottonseed meal per day it Ijl
5! would release four pounds of corn each day from the usual daily feed |
H of about 14 pounds, and 200 days of such feeding to all horses and -I
mules would release 100,000,000 bushels of corn for human food—and l|
ji the mules and the horses would be benefitted by the change. |
y “4 pounds of corn at $1.55 per bushel costs 11 cents. I
y “2 pounds of cottonseed meal at $40 per ton costs 4 cents. |
“The feeder would thus save 7 cents per day on each head of |
stock, or a saving oj $14 per head in a period of 200 days.”
Marianna Cotton Oil Mill

xml | txt