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Des Arc semi-weekly citizen. (Des Arc, Ark.) 1861-1861, June 18, 1861, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arkansas State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89051341/1861-06-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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$4 PSH ANNUM.] frUE8I)AY, 18(33, VOLUME I. NO. 12.
§mi-‘ _____ fen.
By ,1. C. MOHlilLL.
PUBLISHED TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS.
i*fX YEAR-$2 FOR SiX MONTHS.
I INVARIABLY in advance.
RATES OF ADVERTISING:
r),ie Square, ten lines or less. f!l l'or the first
~riion. 50 cents for each one following.
1118 3 mos. 6 mos. 1 year.
I . Sallare.S 7 50 $12 SI 8
f”'1®.12 00 IS 24
L..-18 00 20 30
f ourth Column-20 00 25 45
0 .&f Column.35 00 50 05
Three-fourths Col’n*--45 00 00 7o
Column-,..••50 00 <•> 100
Advertisements may he renewed at any time
■fv paying for composition, $1 per IflOO ems.
Displayed advertisements charged for the
space occupied.
Transient advertisements, one square (10
Unes or less) for the first insertion, $1 ; Each
ubsequent insertion, 50 cts. Payable when
’the advertisement is discontinued.
Persons advertising by contract, will be re
stricted to their legitimate business, and all
uiotices, etc., charged as transient advertise
I meats.
Personal advertisements, if admissable, will
tv charged double the above rates, and must
be paid for in advance.
Publications intended to advance private in
yrest, will be charged at the regular rates of
advertising.
sample announcements of Deaths, when the
facts are furnished will bo published as items
of news; but obituary notices and tributes of
IB respect will be charged for as advertisements,
Sat half the usual rates.
rs* Announcing candidates for State and
■ District offices, $7; County offices, $5; I ow n
gLiiip, offices $3, invariably in advance.
Ii,g^ (tall* on persons lo hecome candidates
r,. charged at the usual rates, except when
iei*.ns i..«king the calls are subscribers to
iar paper. Payment in advance.
(^•Political circulars charged as adver
heuielltS.
"$T Advertisements not ordered for a spe
-hrd +)iu*,-WtU be itrsiit ted ti! 1 forbidden ;-a)ld I
{charged for accordingly.
f/JTAIl advertising to be paid for quarterly. •
CITIZEN‘S;
1 i . .
. ' ’■
{[ AVINC; .soi'tiroll
the services of a supe
rior JOB PRINTER,
the Cmzr.N Officb
i
is prepared te accom
rnodate its customers | ~ "* 1
WITH EVERY DESCRIPTION OP
p;il OMPT L 1' •
CARDS, BIRD HEADS.
[ handbills, CIRCULARS,
Etc., printed in the neatest style.
n
t^e have an excellent stock of Blanks on
hand consisting in part of
DEEDS of CONVEYANCE;
i
QUIT CLAIM DEEDS;
SHERIFF’S TAX DEEDS—
Hie best form in the State.
— ALSO —
Sheriffs’, Justices’ and Constables’
BLANKS.
Hlanr Bills Lading— on superior paper.
We have an excellent
DRY-PRESS,
I which renders the face of the paper free from !
indention by the type.
!!si?“Our old customers are solicited to
send ns their work. Those who have not
hied ns are requested to give us a call.
OUR WORK is well done, and our rates
‘barges as LOW as the LOWEST.
sr Over six years’ experience in the
Hating Rusines at Des Arc, enables ns to
‘■now and appreciate the wants of the public,
bend your Job Work to, and buy your
•‘inks at the Citizen Office mrl3tf
MLMrHIS ADVE RTIS EM ENTS.
I E. MERRIMAN & CO.
N O 253, MAIN-8TB E I> T ^
■ MEMP HIR.TENK
Wave now on hand and For Sale, at the
most reasonable prices, the
Finest Assortment of
Together with all kinds of
nrntixr instruments,
they have ever exhibited in MEMPHIS.
Hlii'ic do jobs Buy your
S } L V E R - W A R E ,
— yarn—
Table it fiery l
CASTORS.
— AM) -
OIVOC'IvS!
Wife Ihem .'if
253 Main Street.
Thu Lmlii'i* nil think they ran ^i-t l'lilh -r
KKTTE3B BSAIM-iAIXS
TFI l\ AT m OT!IESi fl»2.AA’E.
J. K. M Ell III MAN & CO.,
No. 253.Main Street.No. 253.
MEMPHIS, TENN.
0«-t. 10.
TJTFL
T If915 .V T iv J5 T IS 1 * 15 *Z? 12
M E M PUIS.
Stock More Extensive tflian ever,
—AND —
Equal to any in the Union !
Our leading articles are
DIAMONDS,
JEWELRY,
WATCHES,
SILVER-WARE,
. SPECTACLES,
CLOCKS,
GUNS,
PISTOLS, &C„
WITH the usual variety of Goods in our
line.
ALL KINDS OF WORK
Done in the best manner, and with
DESPATCH!
F. H. CLARK & CO.,
XO. 1, Clark’s Marble Block,
MEMPHIS..
Tan. 2. 1861. [6m _ .
IJHpKIOt ED PROPERTY OX REE
XA VISTA STREET FOR SAFE.
THE East half of LOT No 6, Block 25, on
Buena Vista street, in Des Arc, is offered tor
sale cn reasonable terms. The building was
formerly occupied by J. W. Wallace, as a
Family Grocery. The location is one of th;
best in town. For terms, &c., apply to
jan is—tf] J- C. MORRILL.
1 CONFEDRACY OFFICIALS.
PRKST DKNT :
JEFFERSON DAVIS, of Mississippi.
vice president:
! ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS, of Georgia.
caiiinet:
| Rout. Toombs, of Ga., Secretary of State
! C. C. Memminger, of S. C., Sec. of Treasury.
| L. P. Walker, of Ala., Secretary of War.
1. H. Reagan, of Texas, Postinaster-Gen’I.
j J. P. Benjamin, of La., Attorney-General,
j Howell CoBn, of Ga., President of Congress
I J. .1. Hooper, of Ala.. Secretary of Congress.
ARKANSAS OFFICIALS.
E X E C UTIVE D E P A RTM E NT.
! Henry M. Rector, Governor.
' William R. Miller, Auditor Public Accounts.
John I. Stirman, Secretary of State.
'Oliver Basham, State Treasurer,
! J. F. Ritchie, Land Attorney and S-Collector.
John M. Harrell, Solicitor General.
J EDI Cl A I, DEPARTMENT.
Supreme Court.
i E. H. English. Chief Justice.
H. F. Fairchild, ? Agsociatc Jugticc9.
| r. W. Compton, $
j J. L. Holtowell, Attorney General.
Luke E. Barber, Clerk and Reporter.
Federal Cou/t.
i David Pingo, Judge.
Eastern District.
-- -, District Attorney.
.1. G. Halliburton. Marshal.
Richard Searcy, Clerk.
Western District.
Granville Wilcox, District Attorney.
James M. Brown. Marshal.
John B. Ogden, Clerk.
Chancer/j Court at Little Rock.
| U. M. Rose. Chancellor.
I Gorden N. Peay, Cleric and Receiver.
idoiimt i vn n c d \ ut? r r? i’nc M lire
Levin Harrison, p. m.
Fort Smith.—Arrives Mondays and Thurs
I .lays at 2 p. in. Leaves Tuesdays and Satur
days at 10 p. in
| Eastern M \ir..— Arrives by river Tues
days and Thursdays at 4 a. in. Leaves Thurs
days and Satin days at *> a, in.
[Sam Hai.f..—Capt. C. W. Coles—arrives at
Des Arc on Tuesdays, from Napoleon, and
! ouches hei e for her downward mails on Thurs
days, from Jacicsbiiport.'
Kanawha Valley—Capt. D. 11. Price—
(arrives at I)es Arc from Memphis on Tburs
I days, and touches here again on Saturdays for
i her downward mails, from .lacksonport.J
Searcy.—Arrives Tuesdays at li p. in.—
Leaves Mondays at 7 a. in.
Brownsville. — Arrives Saturdays at 0 p.
in. Leaves Fridays at 7 a. in.
Cotton Plant. — Arrives Saturdays at 11
a. in. Leaves same days at 12 p. in.
CH.URCHES.
Des Aim; Svatiov—Methodist Episcopal
| Church South —II. D. McKinnon, Preach
er in charge. Divine service every Sunday at
! [ o'clock j also, a t ft I v lit.
Kapi'ist Church—corner of Erwin and
Park streets—Elder Needham Holland.
Divine Servici: every Lord’s Day at 11 o’clock.
Also, at night.
Presbyterian Churc h—corner of Buena
Vista and Thornhill sheets. Kev. I). L.
Gra y. Preaching evety 2rl ami 4th Sabbath
in each month.
FT. M. HOB IN SON,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALER IN
Groceries mad. SL*roilucc!
— a T.«n —
Receiving, Forwarding &, Com
mission Merchant,
DF.S ARC.ARKANSAS.
j JfeM3___
8i\ ss\ 4'JHOV Mi Bill A* CO.}
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
OGROCERS.M
(Firstdoor Westof J. H. Qiusenberry’s Store.)
I)ES ALIO, ARKANSAS.
rTAAKE pleasure in announcing to the citi
L xens of Prairie and adjacent counties,
that they are nowin receipt of a large and
well selected stock of
GROCERIES AMD HARDWARE,
Consisting in part of Sugars, ATolasses. CoiFee
Candles, Cheese, Vinegar, Salt, Whisky, Rice
Pickles, Sardines, FLOUR, Fish, Raisins
Figs,Citrons, Almonds, Candy, Soap, Starch
Soda, Crackers, Tobacco. Cigars, Nails, Cast
ings, Iron. Steel, Log Chains, Ox do., Pole
Axes, Spades, Shovels. &c., &.c.
With all other articles usually to bn found
in similar establishments. Allot’ which they
are now selling low for Cash.
Des Arc, January 11,1860.—tf.
; T. T. HAMILTON,
| Commission Merchant,
41.UNION STREET.41
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
j
(Formerly of the Firm of)
MMJMMMMjTOW iV IVJEST,
MEMPHIS, TENN.
BEGS leave to inform his friends and the
community in general that he has estab
lished himself now at the above mentioner
place, for the transaction of C'Otlou and
Foul mission Business. All Cottoi
^old for coin. _ March 6-6m.
BULK PORK.
| AAA lb®- Bulk Port just receiver
41 / . * 7\_7\7 and for sale, low FOR CASH
by STEWART & BROTHERS.
| fcb'20
Hon. Lewis T Wigfall.
The following is fin extract of n letter
written from Charleston to the New York
: (black republican) Times:
Mr. VYigfall’s exploit was ns gallant
and chivalrous as any deed of modern
times. Stationed on Morris Island, where
he bad been on foot or in the saddle since
the commencement of the attack, he no
sooner saw the second barracks in flames
and the Hag stuiF shot away, than ho re
solved to make his way to the fort and
persuade Major Anderson to desist from
a resistance manifestly so unavailing.
Despite the remonstrances of those
around him, he embarked in a skifT, and,
with three negro oarsmen and a cock
swain, pulled ov'er to the fort. He was
scarce a hundred yards from the shore,
when they hailed to him to return. “The
stars and strips were again flying.” He
literally turned a “deaf ear” to this call,
and pushed on. brandishing his sword, to
which he had tied his white handkerchief
j as a flag of truce. From the batteries of
j Fort Moultrie balls and shells were aim
ed at the skiff. The white flag was in
visible at that distance, and the boat only
noticed when nearing the fort, if not carry
; ing reinforcements, had no business there,
j A thirty-two pound ball struck the water
j within five yards of her, and was followed
by a shell which came near proving fatal.
The Africans strained every nerve to get
i under the lee of the fort, and the oflicers
i at the batteries, observing that the boat
never swerved from her course, inferred
“that Wigfall must have been in it,” there
by acknowledging his more than Palmetto
recklessness and daring.
On touching the wharf, the eccentric
volunteer sprang ashore, and finding the
gate burst open by flames, made his,way
iouna 10 an open port Hole on tlie town
! side of the fort, through which, with the
I aid of a loose piece of timber which he
i placed beneath it, he swung himself from
j a protruding gun into the embrasure. He
[stumbled, unchallenged, upon one of the
! garrison, who did not know where Major
i Anderson was. The fire was still raging,
[ the heat intense, and the smoke insuffera
ble. Shells were still exploding above,
and from time to time within the fort, from
the mortars on Sullivan's Island. He
! He worked his way up to a group of offi
j cers and men, standing near a easement
j—“Was Major Anderson there?” “No!”
Before the party had recovered from their
j suprise at the apparition, Major Anderson
i came up from the quarter Wigfsil had
| just left. He saw the sword and white
j Handkerchief:
“Whom have I the honor of address
ing ?”
“Gol. Wigfall ofGeneral Beauregard’s
staff.”
i “May I inquite your business with
j me ?”
“I have come to say that you must
strike your colors. Your position is un
tenable. You have defended it gallantly.
It’s madness to persevere to useless re
sistance. You cannot be reinforced.—
You have no provisions. Your ammuni
tion is nearly exhausted, and your fort is
on fire.”
“On what terms do you summons me
to surrender this fort.”
“Unconditional. Gen. Beauregard is
an officer and a gentleman. He will
doubtless grant you all the honors of war,
but speciali gratia."
“Well, I have done all that was possible
to defend this fort.”
“You have. Haul down your flag.”
“But your people are still firing into
I me.
“Hoist a white one—if you won’t, I
will, on my own responsibility.”
A shell burst in the ground within ten
paces of them as they were speaking.—
Major Anderson invited the ex-senator
into a casement; a while flag was hoist
ed and the firing ceased, and what is
called “ihe battle of Fort Sumpter” was
over.
All parties concur that Wigfall’s per
formance was an act of heroism and high
humanity.
You know all the details of the capitu
lation, and have doubtless done justice to
j the delicacy and generosity of the rebel
! general in requiring no parole, besides all
the honors of war to the gallant defenders
of Sumter.
Fifteen hundred troops from Geor
gia, Alabama and Mississippi passed
through Columbia, S. C., on the29th ult.,
on their way to Virginia. The Carolinian
says that about 800 more were expected
to follow in a few days. We will no
doubt have 150,000 armed men there in
ten days.

fiiST* The New Orleans Picayune learns
by a telegraphic despatch from Pass L-’
Outre, that the Brooklyn captured, on the
30th ult, about noon, the bark II, E.
Spearing, from Rio de Janeiro, for that
port with a cargo of coffee valued at $120,
000. A prize crew of teu men was put
on board, and she was despatched to Key
West!
Jefferson Davis' Pen.
At a time when he Was a senator in the
i Congress of the late Union, Jefferson Da
vis, who possesses a large fortune, which
he spends generously, bought, in perpetu
ity, a pew in a Washington church. Af
ter he became chief of the confederation
of the South, the administrators of the
church wrote to him to inform them what
he wished done with his pew. To which
the President responded by authorizing
the administrators to dispose of it as they
thought proper. The administrators, to
mark the donation, had the name of Jef
ferson Davis engraved upon a copper plate,
which was nailed to the pew. The sight
of the name of the illustrious “rebel”
threw the Capitol into a great affright, and
the rumor spread that Davis himself had
had placed there this alarming plate, to
manifest his intention of coming soon to
install bis government at Washington._
Immediately there was a council of tho
Cabinet, Scott s surveillance was redoub
led. and it was with great difficulty a
calm was re-established. What would bo
the effect if Davis were to present himself
in person, when his mere name produces
an alarm like that caused by the words
traced by the invisible hand amoDg the
guests of the feast of Balthazar ?
A Substitute for Reopeninu the
African Slave Trade.—The Rich
mond inquirer thinks that an efficient
substitute for the prohibition of the Slave
I rade by the Southern Confederacy, may
be found in the policy which the North
ern government threatens to inaugerate.
It says :
“Let government call into its service
the negroes of New England, and of tho
middle and northern States, and send them
-f T It
** jmu yji JJIIJUHU 3 iU illy 01 SUU
jugation,’ the South will speedily secure a
huge amount oi negro labor on the most
advantageous terms. Fred. Douglass says
he lias no idea of coming South “just to
be bagged by white tyrants;” but possi
bly Greeley, Giddinge &. Co., may pre
vail on a number of their darkey friends
to come down to be ‘bagged’ on the tobac
co and cotton fields of the South.
©ST* An exchange asks the momentous
question, “where do we stand?” Well,
we should say that, financially and nation
ally, we are standing very nearly on the
flat of our back.—[New Fork Day Book.
A Brave Lady.—Accompanying the
Rome Light Guards, from Georgia, who
arrived at Lynchburg Wednesday, was
the wile of the gallant Captain, who has
determined to share with her husband, to
whom she lias been united in marriage
only a few weeks, all the dangers and pri
vations of the war. She was armed to
the teeth, carrying in a belt around her
waist a very formidable bowieknile and
pistol, which she declared would be used
whenever occasion offered, and that she
felt herself able to use them most effec
tively. Her husband, Captain Magruder,
is a native of Virginia, and is a cousin to
Col. J. Bankhead Magruder, of the Vir
ginia artillery service.—[Petersburg Ex
press.
-■♦ » »
Ex-Gov. Pratt.—The charge against
this gentleman, who was arrested at his
home in Annapolis by the Federal tools,
and taken to Washington, is said to be
high treason. The evidence of this, it is
stated, is revealed by the tone of certain
telegraphic dispatches found among those
seized a few days since.
—-*-♦-«»
How it Works.—The Montgomery
Mail published the following extract from
a private letter, dater Manchester, N. H.,
May 21st:
Business is very dull here in New Eng
land. The cotton mills are stopping all
over the country, and thousands of poor
laborers, who depended upon them for
their daily bread, are out of employment.
Many who have enlisted from this section,
have done it more from necessity than any
desire to fight the South, for there is a
strong feeling here in favor of the South
ern cause, yet it is much suppressed by
the hosts of Black Republican leaders and
politicians, who must maintain their dig
nity in order to carry out their hellish de
signs.
--
It is stated that the U. S. Gov
ernmeat has determined to “give every
man, of whatever rank, serving in the
army or navy, a diploma on fine parch
ment paper, signed by the President and
heads of departments.” This, we sup
pose, is to be a substitute for the money
which they are not likely to get.
-♦♦♦-■.-.
When Napoleon marched on Rus
sia, he led a field army of nearly three
hundred thousand men; but he learned a
lesson which caused him to say “ that no
people who are attached to their institu
tions and their homo can never be con
quered,”

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