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Des Arc semi-weekly citizen. (Des Arc, Ark.) 1861-1861, June 22, 1861, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89051341/1861-06-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME I. NO. 13.
jjY J. C. MOHUILL.
pOBLlSHED TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS.
*fA YEAR-$2 FOR SIX MONTHS,
™ INVAKIAMLY IN’ ADVANCE.
RATES OF ADVERTISING:
One Square, ten lines or less, fl for the firs)
insertion, 50 cents for each one following.
3 mos. 6 mos. 1 year,
4 Squares.12 00 18 24
t so„arCs.18 00 20 30
One-fourth Column--20 00 25 45
One-half Column.35 00 50 65
Three fourths Col’n--45 00 60 75
One Column.50 00 75 1 00
Advertisements rnay be renewed at any time
5j,y paying for composition, $1 per 1000 enis.
^Displayed advertisements charged for the
space occupied.
Transient advertisements, one square (10
lines or less) for the first insertion, $1 ; Each
subsequent insertion, 50 cts. Payable when
the advertisement is discontinued.
Persons advertising by contract, will be re
stricted to their legitimate business, and all
uuftices, etc., charged as transient advertise
ments.
Personal advertisements, if admissable, will
Tie charged double the above rates, and must
Ibe paid for in advance.
Publications intended to advance private in
'terest, will be charged at the regular rates of
advertising.
Simple announcements of Deaths, when the
facts are furnished will be published as items
_ . i_l _u:~ t.ik.dnn ~p
'ti L II cna ) w.w ---.
respect will be charged for as advertisements,
at half the usual rates.
w Announcing candidates for State and
District offices, $7$ County offices, $5-; Town
ship, offices $3, invariably in advance.
W ]alls oi^persons to become candidates
are charged at the usual rates, except when
pet suns making the calls are subscribers to
our paper. Payment in advance.
(jyPolitical circulars charged as adver
tisements.
er Advertisements not ordered for a spe
cified time, will be inserted till forbidden, and
oharged for accordingly.
(jyAll advertising to be paid for quarterly.
CITIZEN‘S
Job Office!
Having secured
the services of a supe
rior JOB PRINTER,
the Citizen Oif ce
is prepared te accom
modate its customers
WITH EVERY DESCRIPTION OF
PRINTING,
prompt lx.
CARDS, BILL HEADS,
HANDBILLS, CIRCULARS,
Etc., printed in the neatest style.
We have an excellent stock of Blanks on
hand consisting in part of
DEEDS OF CONVEYANCE;
QUIT CLAIM DEEDS;
SHERIFF’S TAX DEEDS—
the best form in the State.
— ALSO —
Sheriffs’, Justices’ and Constables’
BLANKS.
Blank Bills Lading— on superior paper.
We have an excellent
DRY-PRESS,
which renders the face of the paper free from
indention by the typo.
(£y*Our old customers are solicited to
send us their work. Those who have not
tried us are requested to give us a call.
OUR WORK is well done, and our rates
»f charges as LOW as the LOWEST.
Over six years’ experience in the |
Printing Busines at Des Arc, enables us to
know and appreciate the wants of the public.
Send your Job Work to, and buy your
Blanks at the Citizen Off ice.
MEMPHIS ADVERTISEMENTS.
J. E. MERRIMAN & CO. ~
N O 253, MAIN-STREET,
MEMPHIS.TENN.,
Have now on hand and For Sale, at the
most reasonable prices, the
Finest Assortment of
GUNS AND RIFLES,
Together with all kinds of
HUNTING INSTRUMENTS,
they have ever exhibited in MEMPHIS.
Where do yon Buy your
SILVER. WARE,
— YOUR—
Tabic Cutlery !
CASTORS.
—AND—
CLOCKS!
Wife bought thera at
253 Main Street.
The Ladies all think they can get rather
BETTER BARGAINS
'
—AT
MERRIMAN’S
THAN AT ANY OTHER PEACE.
J. E. MERRIMAN & CO.,
Ne. 253.Main Street.No. 253.
MEMPHIS, TENN.
Oct. 10.
OUR
T WE JYTIE TH 1’E.IK
— IN—
MEMPHIS.
Stock Hore Extensive than ever,
-AND
Equal to any in the Union !
Our leading articles are
DIAMONDS,
JEWELRY,
WATCHES,
SILVER-WARE,
SPECTACLES,
CLOCKS,
GUNS,
PISTOLS, &C-,
WITH the usual variety of Goods in our
line,
ALL KINDS OF WORK
Done in the best manner, and with
DESPATCH!
F. H. CLARK & CO.,
NO. 1, Clark’s Marble Block,
MEMPHIS.TENN.
Jan. 2, 1861- [6rn ___
,MP»UM ei> property oi* bee
IVA VISTA STREET FOR SAI.E.
THE East half of LOT No 6, Block 2ft, on
Buena Vista street, in lies Arc, is offered for
sale on reasonable terms. rlhe building was
formerly occupied bv J W. Wallace, as a
Family Grocery. The location is one of the
best iii town. For term*, &c., apply to
jau 18—tf] J- V MOKhlLL.
CONFEDRACY OFFICIALS.
PRESI D KNT :
JEFFERSON DAVIS, of Mississippi.
^ vice president:
ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS, of Georgia.
cabinet:
Robt. Toombs, of Gn., Secretary of State,
C. C. Mkmminger, of S. C., Sec. of Treasury.
L. P. Walker, of Ala., Secretary of War.
J. H. Reagan, op Texas, Postmaster-Gen’l.
J. P. Benjamin, of La., Attorney-General.
Howell Cobb, of Ga., President of Congress.
J. J. Hooper, of Ala., Secretary of Congress.
ARKANSAS OFFICIALS.
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT.
Henry M. Rector, Governor.
William R. Miller, Auditor Public Accounts.
John I. Stirinan, Secretary of State.
Oliver Basham, State Treasurer,
J. F. Ritchie, Land Attorney and S. Collector.
John M. Harrell, Solicitor General.
JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT.
Supreme Court.
E. H. English, Chief Justice.
F. W. Comjtlf,;} Associate Justices.
J. L. Hollowell, Attorney General.
Luke E. Barber, Clerk and Reporter.
Federal Court.
David Pingo, Judge.
Eastern District.
—--, District Attorney.
J. G. Halliburton, Marshal.
Richard Searcy, Clerk.
Western District. ,
Granville Wilcox, District Attorney.
James M. Brown, Marshal.
John B. Ogden, Clerk.
Chancery Court at Little Rock.
U. M. Rose, Chancellor.
Gorden N. Feay, Clerk and Receiver.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE OF MAILS.
Levin Harrison, p. m.
Fort Smith.—Arrives Mondays and Thurs
days at 2 p. in. Leaves Tuesdays and Satur
days at 10 p. m
Eastern Mail.—Arrives by river Tues
days and Thursdays at 4 a. m. Leaves Thurs
days and Saturdays at 6 a. m.
[Sam Hale.—Capt. C. W. Coles—arrives at
Des Arc on Tuesdays, from Napoleon, and
touches heie for her downward mails on Thurs
days, from Jacksonport.
Kanawha Valley—Capt. D. B. Price—
arrives at Des Arc from Memphis on Thurs
days. and touches here again on Saturdays for
her downward mails, from Jacksonport.]
Searcy.— Arrives Tuesdays at 6 p. in.—
Leaves Mondays at 7 a. m.
Brownsville.—Arrives Saturdays at 6 p.
in. Leaves Fridays at 7 a. in.
Cotton Plant.—Arrives Saturdays at 11
a. in. Leaves same days at 12 p. m.
CHURCHES.
Des Arc Station—Methodist Episcopal
Church South —H. D. McKinnon, Preach
er in charge. Divine service every Sunday at
11 o’clock ; also, at night.
Bapcist Church—corner of Erwin and
Park streets—Elder Needham Holland.
Divine Service every J^ord’s Day at 11 o’clock.
Also, at night.
Presbyterian Church—corner of Buena
Vista and Thornhill streets. Rev. D. L.
GRAy. Preaching every 2d and 4th Sabbath
in each month.
carter, mccauley & t o.,
DEALERS IN
Staple and Fancy Dry Goods,
BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS,
Ready-Made Clothing, Cutlery and
Queensware.
SEARCY, ARK.
Janll-ly.
F. M. ROBINSON,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALER IN
Groceries and Produce !
—ALSO —
Receiving, Forwarding ^.Com
mission merchant,
DES ARC.ARKANSAS.
febl3
A. WHIPPLE. ARCH RfcrtT>. M. O. HOPKINt.
PLANING MILL.
—AND—
lwsnb®® YAM»i
SASH, DOORS AND BLINDS,
WE have recently built a large addition tt
our Plaining Mill, and fitted up our
manufacturing department with all the mo
dem machinery for the manufacture of Sash,
Doors, Blinds, Moulding; Mantels, Door and
Window Frames, Casings, Cornice, Brackets,
Newel Posts, Turning and Scroll Work, of
every style. We have on band a large stock
of Lumber of all kinds, Flooring, White Pine
and Poplar Weather-boarding, Sheeting Shin
gles, Fencing, and a large lot of Cedar Posts.
Our manufacturing department is under the
supervision of an experienced foreman, and we
flatter ourselves that as to price, quality, style
and durability we can compete with any simi
lar establishment in the United States. Oi
ders promptly filled. __
WHIPPLE, REID & CO.
Planing Mill, near the Bayou on Madison
Street, Memphis, Tenn.
Sept. 5, 1800—ly. ___•_
Faints, Oil and Turpentine,
4 LWA YS on hand and for sale, by
/Y fel.181 STKWART BRO’S.
Extortion.—Wo copy the following
from the Lynchburg Republican:
We hope that no man in the present
crisis of affairs will lake advantage of the
necessities of the people by advancing the
prices of their goods, wares and merchan
dise. He who does it is no belter than
Hook of revolutionary memory. A mer
chant who has bought bacon at 10 cents
and sells it at 20, coffee at 14 and seifs it
at 25, flour at 5 and sells it at 10, is an
enemy of his race and country. No pa
triot will do it. Every friend of humanity
will execrate it. Our merchants should
seM everything they have on hand at their
usual prices; when they have to purchase
new supplies at advanced rates, then they
should sell at a reasonable advance only.
Otherwise the poor of our town and coun
try will be unable to live at all, especially
when we have a hundred thousand volun
teers in the field. Every dollar extorted
from the necessities of our people is just
so much aid and comfort to the enemy.
We hope every man who respects himself,
and loves his country and regards human
ity, will frown down all approaches to ex
tortion.”
— . ..
Galvanic Submarine Batteries.—'
We would suggest the depositing of Mag
netic Sub-marine Batteries at half a dozen
points on the Mississippi River between
Cairo and Vicksburg. These batteries
to be sunk privately and each managed
by a single scientific gentleman, who
might, if properly arranged the whole
width of the channel, deal destruction
most complete to any craft or floating bat
tery which might be sent down the Fa
thpr nf Wntpra hv fhn finunda nf Chinnorn
*» w
or Cincinnati.
Will the constituted authorities look to
this matter, and ascertain if more could
not be accomplished, in one instant, by
the means suggested, than could be effect
ed against Iron Batteries in a month
with all the cannon from Cairo to the
mouth ?
A Virginia Woman.—An incident
like the following, furnished by a corres
pondent of the Staunton Spectator, is truly
worthy of record: **
As the Augusta, Rockbridge and Rock
ingham troops marched down the valley
to Harper’s Ferry, Mrs. Heter, a widow
lady residing near the village of Middle
town, in Frederick county, but at a con
siderable distance from the road, gave ev
idence of her kindness of heart and sym
pathy for our weary men. She had a ta
ble carried to the road-side, and with her
own^hands, assisted by her servants, car
ried but a quantity of milk, bread, pies and
other comforts, and for two days fed from
one to two hundred. At parting with them
she said: “My only son, seventeen years
of age has gone in a company from our
neighborhood. If in the defense of your
country, any of you should sicken or be
wounded, and can get to my house, I will
do all 1 can to minister to your comfort.”
«♦ • »
[email protected]“It is stated in a Missouri paper
that a Mormon tax gatherer called upon a
tough old trapper, who lived within his
“circuit,” for taxes imposed .by Brigham
Young for some purpose or other; the trap
per listened to his demand quietly, and
then said, with a grim smile: “Jus’ so;
call on me a week from to-day, ahd I’ll
pay you in Mormon scalps! The tax
gatherer had not relumed at the latest ac
counts.
—.. -.
During the Mexican war, the cel
ebrated rowdy Massachusetts Regiment
was stationed in the neighborhood of some
of the Kentucky troops. It was previous
to the taking of Vera Cruz. Dumpsy
Glass, a private in the Kentucky Regi
ment, was a wag, but very troublesome—
often drunk, and spent most of his time in
the guard-house. Being visited one day
by an officer, who knew him at his best,
who said : “Halloo, Dumps, in the guard
house again ?” “Yes,” said Dumpsy, “it
'pears to me I spend most of my time in
this d—d calaboose; but if I could get out
here, I could tell Gen. Scott how he could
take Vera Cruz without firing a gun.” In
due time this remark reached the ears of
the Commander-in-Chief. He visited the
dissipated and imprisoned engineer, and
accosted him saying he had been told that
he had a plan to take Vera Cruz by strat
agem, involving no loss of life. “Yes,”
said Dumpsy, “if you’ll let me out, Gen
eral, I’ll disclose my plan.” He was im
mediately released, when he stepped up
to the General’s ear and whispered to him,
“take the Massachusetts Regiment, and
place them in sight of Vera Cruz, and in
less than two minutes I’m d—d if they
don’t steal it.—[N. O. Delta.
• .
The Cincinnati Press says the
poor women of that city gel eight cents
each for making soldiers shirts. With
the aid of sewing machines they can make
three in a day. Heavy wages they make
—twenty-four cents a day. A soldier’s
daily rations are estimated at thirty-five
cents. The poor women must feed, clothe
and shelter themselves for less. Heaven
help them.
Campaigning Axioms.
1. One well fed, well equipped, well
appointed brigade is worth two that aro
ill provided.
2. In active service, three men die of un
due exposure, bad food, and their own im
prudeuces, where one is killed by shot or
slab.
3. An easy, rational, nicely flitting
uniform, with warm, substantial blanket,
broad-soled boots or shoes and good wool
en socks, will more conduce to efficiency
in service than superiority in weapons.
4. The lightest possible head-covering
with a good look-out for ventillation, will
add a tenth to the distance a regiment can
inarch in a day, while insuring increased
comfort.
5. A small cotton handkerchief, or half
a yard of the commonest sheeting, moist
ened with water iti the morning and again
at noon, and worn between the hat and
the head, will protect the soldier from sun
stroke and greatly diminish the discomfort
and fatigue of a hot day's march.
6. A flat bottle covered with woolen
cloth, the cloth being moLtened and the
bottle Ailed with water in the morning,
will keep reasonably cool throughout a
long, hot day.
7. Of all villainous concoctions, the li
quors sold by camp-followers are the most
detestable and dangerous. They are
more deadly than rifled cannon, and are
sure to be taken just when they should not
be. Every soldier who means to do his
duty to his country should insist that all
yenders of these poisons be drummed out
of camp.
8. A good cook for each company, who
knows bow to make suit meat juicy and
tender, and to have it ready whenever and
wherever it may be wanted, is equal to
two doctors and four extra combatants.
9. Officers who love and care for their
men while in repose never have to com
plain of their conduct when in action.
10. A soldier whose heart is in the
cause he fights for is worth two who fight
for their pay.
— . ----
What Wah nAs Cost the World.—
The war preceding the treaty of Ryswick,
in 1697, cost $130,000,000.
TheBSpauish war of 1739, settled for at
Aix-la-Chapelle, cost $270,000,000.
The war of the Spanish succession cost
$311,000,000.
The treaty of Paris, in 1763, ended a
bloody struggle, which cost $260,000,000.
The war of American Independence
cost England and this country $930,000,
000.
The war of ten years, which is known
as “The French Revolution of 1793,” coat
$230,000,000.
The war against the First Napoleon,
which began in 1803 and ended in 1815,
cost the extraordinary amount of $5,800,
000,000.
The last Italian war, (not including the
hostilities between Victor Emmanuel,
Garibaldi, Bomba, etc.) cost $45,000,
Q00.
The last war in India cost England
$38,000,000.
The list might be doubled. Includes
wars of which only definite statistics are
on record.
-. ■» • •» ■
Touching the Enemy on the Raw.—
The New Orleans Bee, speaking of the
operations of provateers that have been
fitted out from that port says: ^
“A number of our prominent citizens
own slock in these lucky privateers, and
they have never known before such a pro
fitable business. Their investments have
been more than doubled in' a week, and
will probably go on in like ratio. This
great success, too, will give vast encour
agement to many capitalists who have not
yet embarked in privateering to do so.
As the distant squadrons of the United
States navy have been generally recalled,
and the North has no war vessels to spare
for the protection of its ships, every sea
on the globe is a fruitful field for captures,
and at the end of the war the South will
have a splendid commercial marine of
prizes within her own ports.”
The Gulf Fbee to Slavers.—The
Cuban slave trade, since the withdrawal
of the United States squadron from the
coast of Cuba, is said to be carried on with
redoubled vigor. Six cargoes have been
landed on the “ever faithful isle” since the
24th of March. The British Admiral
Milne is said to have relaxed his vigi
lance, and does not hesitate to say to
American merchants that he is not going
to do double duty, slave hunting, as he has
been compelled to do since the withdrawal
of the Yankees.
—---—,
Ex-President Fillmore has ac
cepted the post of Captain of company G,
Seventy-fourth regiment, New York.
--»—
The New York Post says there
has been a remarkable decrease of crime
in that city since the war commenced.

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