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Eastern Colorado times. (Cheyenne Wells, Colo.) 1912-1913, April 05, 1912, Image 1

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EASTERN COLORADO TIMES
VOL. VI.
LATEST NEWS
EPITOMIZED
FROM TELEGRAPHIC REPORTB
THAT COVER THE WEEK’*
EVENT*.
OF MOST INTEREST
KEEPING THE READER POSTED
ON MOBT IMPORTANT
CURRENT TOPIC*.
Western Newspaper Union News Service.
WESTERN.
Dates for the American Mining Con
gress to be held in Spokane this year
have been fixed for Nov. 25-30.
The breaking up of the ice in the
Platte Loup and Elkhorn rivers in Ne
braska is causing serious floods.
Ralph Raymond, locomotive fireman,
has been arrested in Chicago for rob
bing the body of a man killed by his
engine.
Reuben Harris, 87 years old, mar
shal of Quitman, Mo., is dying as a
result of the excitement attendant on
his first arrest.
To make smooth the path of the bor
rowers, the legal authorities of Salt
Lake county, Utah, are making war
on loan Bharks.
The Butte, Mont., miner’s union of
the Western Federation of Miners
voted to take a referendum vote upon
- the question of striking.
One life sacrificed for each million
tons of coal produced, was the human
toll exacted by the coal mining indus
try of Colorado of 1911.
The ten millionaire packers charged
with criminal responsibility for pack
ing combine were found not guilty in
Federal Court in Chicago.
The Interstate Commerce Commis
sion has refused to grant the proposed
advance on lemons from California
points to Colorado, Montana and Utah.
Columbine university of New York
will send a large squad of studehts to
the wheat fields of Kansas, Nebraska,
Montana and the Dakotas this summer
to work as farm hands and laborers.
A cave-in in a stope at the Utah
Apex mine at Bingham, Utah, buried
Harry Thomas and Thomas Bosanko,
miners. They were dead when taken
out.
Railroad employes of Colorado do
not want a reduction of railroad rates
which will result in a similar reduc
tion of their salaries, according to the
sense of the meeting of the Railway
Employes and Investors’ Association
at Denver.
That Jake McKinney, formerly the
convict in the state prison at Rusk,
Texas, who was freed by Governor
Colquitt because of a touching poem
the convict was said to have written,
stole the poem, is the assertion made
by the News, published at the Colum
bus, Ohio, state prison.
That nearly fifty of the Industrial
Workers of the World arrested in San
Francisco have admitted they were
trying to overthrow the United States
government is one of the statements
contained in a report which the Cali
fornia authorities will send to the im
migration bureau at Washington.
Frank Stribbling, who went duck
hunting recently near FremQnt, Neb,
nnd was supposed to have been
drowned in the Platte river flood, has
been located in the top of a big tree
two miles out in the river, from the
city. He had been caught by the ris
ing waters and had climbed the tree,
where he had been four days and
where he must remain several days.
'-J’he proposition to bond the city of
San Krancisco for $8,800,000 for the
purchase of land and the erection of
municipal' buildings In the proposed
civic center carried by an overwhelm
ing majority.
Tho Postoffice Department an
nounces that January 31, 1912, there
were seventy-seven postal savings de
positories in operation In Colorado,
with deposits amounting to over $496,-
000. This amount was deposited by
about 4,600 depositors, or an average
of SIOB per depositor.
(SUCCESSOR TO DIVIDE FARMER)
CHEYENNE WELLS, CHEYEN r NE COUNTY, COLO., FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1912.
WASHINGTON.
A bill to abolish the U. S. Commerce
Court has been favorably reported to
the House by the interstate commerce
committee.
The bill by Representative Hughes
of New Jersey, virtually taxing out qf
existence the phosphorus match indus
try In the United States, was passed
by the House after a heated debate.
Physical valuation of all the rail
roads of the United States is author
ized in a bill reported unanimously to
the House by the Interstate and for
eign commerce committee. The Inter
state Commerce Commission is em
powered to make the valuation and to
fix and adjust rates.
The Senate of the United States will
run a lottery to determine the length
of tenure of office of the new senators
from Arizona and New Mexico. There
will be two five-year terms, one three
year term, and one one-year term. The
new members will draw from a box
squares of paper on which appears the
length of the term they are to serve.
President Taft will send to Congress
soon what he regards as one of the
most important messages he has writ
ten this year. He will recommend leg
islation designed to save millions of
dollars each year, consolidate several
general bureaus and generally make
the machinery or the government con
form more nearly with the plans
drawn by the economy and efficiency
commission appointed in June, 1910. It
wil be Mr. Taft's second “economy"
message during the present year, but
in the one he wrote in January he
made no recommendations as to legis
lation. Practically every department
of the government is concerned in the
proposed reforms. Reforms indicated
as feasible in the President’s January
mesage, he said, would probably save
the people more than- $2,000,000 an
nually but it is said that other
changes worked out since then would
largely increase the total.
A series of rumors concerning the
Mexican situation, covering every pos
sible phase of activity on the part of
the American government, from actual
intervention and assemblage of great
military forces on the border, down to
the dispatch of an embassy guard to
the Mexican capital is surging through
official Washington. President Taft
believes there is no ground for Inter
vention In Mexico and has not changed
that belief as the result of the military
engagements in Mexico within the last
few days. Consequently no steps have
been taken within that time to
strengthen *the American military
force on the border, nor to prepare
any expeditionary force for operation
in Mexican territory. The supposition
that anything of importance could be
done in that direction without some
knowledge an the part of the country
at large and a direct appeal to Con
gress is declared by the military au
thorities to be absurd.
SPORT.
W. E. Hasha of Dallas, Tex., low
ered the one mile world's motorcycle
record from 40 1-5 seconds to 39 3-3
seconds at the Stadium one-third mile
track In Los Angeles.
The cost of equipping a major
league baseball team of twenty-five
players is somewhere in the ueighbor
hod of $2,320 each spring, according to
a statement by Thomas G. Davis of
the New York Americans.
Carl Morris, whose aspirations as a
"white hope" received another set
back from Jim Stewart in New York,
is on his way back to Oklahoma for
a vacation. Boxing experts doubt
whether he will attempt to return to
the arena for a long time, if at all.
The matchmakers of the National
Sporting Club are said to have with
drawn their offer for a ten-round bout
between the Oklahoma giant and A1
Palzer.
Harry B. Stout of Milwaukee has an
nounced that New Orleans promoters
had authorized him to offer a purse
of $17,000 for a twenty-round fight be
tween Ad Wolgast ahd Joe Mandot,
the battle to be fought within two
months. Mandot already has accept,
ed the offer and agreed to make 133
pounds ringside for the champion. He
is willing that the bout go to a finish.
Bombardier Wells, England's heavy
weight champion, who is matched to
box A1 Palzor in San Francisco July
4, will sail for this country May 11.
FOREIGN.
A fnteful day In the history of Brit
ish trade struggles came to a close
with the passage through Parliament
by a large majority of the bill estab
lishing in legislation the principle 'of
a minimum wage in the mining indus
try. The vote was 213 to 48.
GENERAL.
The Ohio constitutional convention
adopted an initiative and referendum
measure.
John Arbuckle, the well known cof
fee man, died in Brooklyn. He was
seventy-four and leaves many millions.
Suffragists have announced that
they will print a daily paper in Chica
go, devoted to the cause of equal suf
frage.
There are 15.0lS.5G9 Catholics in the
United States proper, according to the
1912 edition of Kennedy’s Official
Catholic Directory.
The total value of imports of farm
products into the United States in
1910 was $1,550,947,430, as against $1,
226,502,440 in 1906.
The law department of Chicago will
be asked to decide whether the city is
liable for a claim of $10, filed with the
council finance committee for the loss
of a pet parrot.
Massachusetts is to send a commit
tee, made up principally of wage earn
ers, to Europe to investigate labor con
ditions. The committee Is specifical
ly directed to visit great manufactur
ing institutions.
Prices of carpeting and rugs are
likely to advance sharply during the
next two months, according to trade
announcements, owing to the scarcity
of desirable carpet wools in the mar
kets of the world.
The Michigan House, by a vote of
75 to 19, passed the bill providing for
a vote at the fall election on a consti
tutional amendment granting women
suffrage in that state. It now goes to
the governor.
The ground water of the United
States, upon which the agricultural
wealth of the country depends, is low
ering at the rate of nearly two feet a
decade, according to Professor \V. .7.
McGee, soil and water expert of the
Department of Agriculture.
Staiving, helpless and fatigued,
Claude Swanson Allen came out of the
Laurel thicket in the Blue Ridge near
Hillsville, Va,'pointed two six-shoot
ers toward the sky and gave himself
up to the posse which for nearly two
weeks had hunted him.
The Senate rejected the Sherwood
dollar-a-day pension bill, which had
passed the House, and then adopted
60 to 10, the Smoot general age and
service pension measure, under which
the pension-roll would be increased
by $20,000,000 annually during the
next five years.
Alt-iough strikes are still In prog
ress In various Massachusetts textile
centers, the week has brought about a
noticeable improvement m general
conditions. Several of the smaller la
bor difficulties have been settled and
a strike of 30,000 cotton mill opera
tives at New Bedford was averted by
the granting of the ten per cent ad
vance. Similar advances were made ill
other mills in New England, so that
at least 100,000 operatives will sharo
in the distribution.
After being out for twenty-four
hours, the Jury which has been trying
the otticials of the sugar trust on the
charge of criminal conspiracy growing
out of the closing of the plant of the
Pennsylvania Sugar Refining Compa
ny following a loan of $1,250,000 to
its owner, Adolph Segal of Philadel
phia, reported that It was unable to
agree and was discharged by Federal
Judge Hand.
Woman suffrage and the election of
United States Senators by direct vote
were defeated In the State Senate of
Massachusetts bv close votes.
Senator Stephenson of Wisconsin,
octogenarian millionaire banker and
lumberman, retains his seat in the Sen
ate. By a vote of 40 to 34 the Sen
ate declared his election valid and re
jected the charge that $107,793 which
the senator admitted spending in the
Wisconsin primaries had been used
corruptly.
The report of the state charities
commission recommends that all cor
poral punishment In public or private
institutions caring for children be pro
hibited by law.
LITTLE COLORADO ITEMS.
Small Happening! Occurring Over the
Btate Worth While.
Western Newspaper Union News Service.
The state has taken over the Estes
Park fish hatchery.
Despondency, due to ill health,
caused Dee Skinner, aged 45, to kill
himself at Rocky Ford.
Tw) cases of ptomaine poisoning
were leported recently in Loveland
from canned tomatoes.
Mrs. Catherine C. Forquer, a pioneer,
died at Greeley, aged sixty. She came
to Colorado thirty years ago.
Work on the main line of the Mis
souri Pacific between Pueblo and Kan
sas City will begin at once.
May Day celebration will be given
May 4. on the university campus of
the University of Colorado at Boulder.
Mrs. E. P. Fink will build the new
rtate armory at Fort Lupton, to be
leased to Company I at a cost of SS,
000.
A,new electric light system for Gree
ley will be installed if the franchise
asked from the City Council April 1C
is granted.
Farmers around Windsor have be
gun a series of meetings with the ob
ject of promoting the dairy Industry
of that district.
A. T. Stewart of Pueblo has been
chosen president of the State Insane
Asylum Board and Dr Louis Haugh of
Denver, secretary.
J. W. Ewing received a record price
for fat lambs shipped from Greeley
this season when he topped the Chi
cago market at $8.25.
E. H. Abbott, an orginal Union Col
onist, a resident of Greeley for forty
one years, and the city’s first mayor,
died at his home in that city.
The growth of Oak Creek during the
last year Is clearly shown by the regis
tration for town election, which is 363,
compared with 210 a year ago.
W. C. Winbourne of Fort Lupton
will pioneer corn growing and plant 100
Peres of corn on hts dry farm east of
that place, if he can rid it of prairie
dogs.
Interest is already aroused oyer
postcard day in Colorado when on May
18 thousands of postcards wil be sent
out advertising the resources of tho
state.
It l as been decided to hold the Jef
ferson county Democratic convention
at Arvada on Saturday, April 20, 1912.
The convention will have 190 dele
gates.
The work of raising $2,000 in Pueb
lo to buy seed grain for the destitute
farmers of Kiowa county has been com
pleted and the grain will be shipped
to the settlers at once.
One of the largest eagles in captivi
ty was taken to Mayor Speer's office
in Denver y J. W. Davis, a Byers,
Colo., ranches. It is said to be a per
fect type of the American eagle.
Both batteries of the Colorado Na
tional Guard have been invited anj
will attend the Joint, camp of instruc
tion to be held under the direction of
Unlten States army officers at Fort
Riley, Kan., June 15 to June 24.
The Fort Lewis Indian school, for
which the last Legislature appropriat
ed SGO,OOO for maintenance, may be
able to collect the entire appropriation
immediately on account of its relation
with the United States government.
Following an operation for enlarged
tonsils and adenoids, which had not
been regarded as dangerous, Kathleen
Seaman, the three-year-old daughter of
K. E. Seaman of Idaho Springs, died
in Boulder at the University hospital.
W L. Lawson, district manager for
the Great Western Sugar Company,
has sent circulars to beet raisers for
the Fort Morgan, Brush and Sterling
tactories announcing that prizes aggre
gating $3,000 will be given by the com
pany this year to the most successful
growers. Each factory offers SI,OOO in
prizes.
About 400 acres have been contract
ed for growing peas for earthing In the
Greeley district. Nearly as much has
been secured at Johnstown for the
Longmont cannery. Hulling plants will
be put up In Johnstown and Ault at a
cost of $16,000 each.
That the affairs of the Union Trad
ing Company of Colorado, which went
Into bankruptcy several months ago,
will be straightened out when the
present stockholders pay 75 cents on
the dollar for the property and assets
not disposed of, has been decided.
WEEK’S EVENTS
IN
COLORADO
Western Newenaner Union News Service.
COMING EVENTS IN COI.OIIADO.
April 29. —Democratic Slate Convention.
Colorado Springs.
May 6-11.—State Y. M. C. A. Convention,
Pueblo.
June 18-20.—State Sunday School Con
. ventlon, Colorado Springs.
June 11-July 19.—Summer Term, Stato
Teachers’ College. Greeley,
Mine Students Give Aid Exhibition.
Golden—The first public exhibition
of oxygen helmet rescue and first aid
work ever given in the state of Colo
rado was held on the campus of the
School of Mines recently.
Colorado Republicans for Taft.
Colorado Springs.—President Wil
liam Howard Taft received a solid in
structed delegation of eight delegates
to the National Republican convention
in Chicago here at the Republican
State convention.
Grand Junction Wants Highway.
Grand Junction.—At a meeting of
the Chamber of Commerce and city
commissioners it was decided to start
a state-wide movement to prevent the
through national highway being
changed so as not to include Grand
Junction and the greater part of Colo
rado
School Makes Profit from Lunches.
Longmont.—That the domestic sci
ence department of the Longmont
High school is self-supporting through
the sale of hot lunches to students was
shown by the report of a committee.
During the six weeks the lunch plan
has been carried on $252.71 was real
izetT; operating expenses were $250.
leaving a surplus of $2.71.
Government Sues Pueblo Bank.
Pueblo. The Western National
bank of Pueblo has been sued by the
ieder:-.l government for $25,000 dam
eges for the alleged use of 40,00 acres
of land ih Bent and Pueblo counties,
belonging to Uncle Sam. Charles E.
Saxton, cashier of the bank, was
served with the papers by Thomas
ClarA. United States deputy marshal.
New Concern Takes Seaman Holdings.
San Luis. —The San Luis Lana,
Light & Power Company, composed of
Colorado and Eastern parties, has
been organized to take over the irri
gation properties of the Seaman Syn
dicate in the Terrace district of Cone
jos couhty. The construction of thirty
miles of casals and laterals, reservoirs
and dams will be carried to completion
at an outlay of $2,000,000.
Bumper Potato Crop for Weld.
Greeley.—During the last month the
main question before the farmers of
the county has been how to make the
potato crop of this season a bumper
one. Meetings have been held all over
the county by C. L. Fitch, the potato
expert of the Agricultural college, at
which he has presented information
concerning potato diseases, obtained
by experiments at the college during
the last year.
Sugar Beet Seed Distributed.
Greeley.—Sugar beet seed is being
sent out by the Great Western Sugar
Company for distribution among the 1,-
800 growers of this district and they
are expected to begin planting April
18. 'lho sugar company has 05,000
pounds of seed for the Greeley, Eaton
rnd Windsor growers, allowing fifteen
pounds to the acre. The value of this
seed is close to $68,000. The farmers
will not be required to advance money
for the seed, but the cost will be de
ducted from the first two checks paid
growers.
San Juan Asks Denver for Help.
Denver. —A plea lor a closer rehu
tlonship between Denver and the SaD
Juan country was made by the 100
members of the San Juan Commercial
Congress at the luncheon given in
their honor by the Chamber of Com
merce. They asked the cooperation of
the Chamber of Commerce in an effort
to Induce the Denver & Rio Grande to
shorten Its'route between Denver and
the southwestern part-of the state and
to broad gauge Its - present narrow
gauge lines.
NO. 15.

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