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Americus times-recorder. [volume] (Americus, Ga.) 1891-current, December 25, 1900, Image 1

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■I W ENT' -SECOND YEAR.
IMPORTANT I NOUNCEMENT
GOING OUT OF BUSINESS.
Mier eighteen years of close confinement
in the Dry Goods business, I have decid
ed to make a change. My entire line of
Di v Goods, Clothing, Shoes, Hats
and Gents’ Furnishing Goods-
a ill be thrown upon the market Monday
morning at SACRIFICE PRICES to close
out for CASH.
I could no doubt sell this entire stock
in bulk, but prefer to give my customers
and friends who have traded with me in
the past, the benefit of this opportunity
to supply their wants at
GrTb ex nr 1 ▼
tor a time. I have no old goods or trashy
stock to palpi off on the public, for you
/all know I have been in business only a
/ short time since my separation from the
J old firm.
f Everything must be sold sold as
rapidly as possibly, for the shorter the
K sale, the less the expense. Come at once
T and get some of the big bargains in Dress
' Goods, Silks, Velvets, Woolens, Clothing
. tor 'len and Boys, Shoes, Hats and Caps,
f Gents’ Furnishing Goods, Table Linens,
lowels, Hosiery, Handkerchiefs, Gloves,
I Ladies’, Gents’ and Children’s Under
I wear, Shirts, Overcoats, Umbrellas, l)o
--| mestics, Notions of all kinds, Ladies’
I Capes and Jackets, (all new), and in fact
B everything in the store must go
r Regardless of Prices!
g Now is your chance! Comeat once
« and trade with confidence, and you will
II be accorded the same fair treatment you
have always received at my store.
|| Yours to close out,
| Allen.
“All The World a Lover Loves.”
Is a tiuism a; old as love itself, and all lovers of the
beautiful and artistic in HOLIDAY GOODS can please
their loved ones by selecting presents from our superb stock
Mover before have we carried such a magnificent line of
Christmas goods. and the most fastidious can get what they
ant here. In Toikt Sets. Cut-Glass goods, Shaving Sets,
portfolios, Leather Goods, Manicure Sets, Fite Vases, etc.
Our line excels all others. Buy HIM a handsome Meer,
schaum Pipe, in the smoke of vhich he can conjure up
visions of his “angel.” Buy HER that superb Toilet Set
and your case is won. At all events go to
.1. R. HUDSON’S For Christmas Goods. I
PROFESSIONAL CARDS- j
W.T. Use . H. L M avsaki.l
L.ANR & MAYNARD, I
LAWYERS.
AMERICUS, : GEORGIA.
M' T "' *'* f ’‘ >s - 15 and 17 Planters Bank Build-
|JR PETER E. BAHNSEN.
Veterinary Surgeon.
Office at Turpin Bros, or G. O. Loving’s
stables.
QR. B. B. HUDSON, ‘
... . AND SURGEON
lenders his professional services to the put-
Lails left at Hudson's drug store oil)
receive prompt attention.
J AMKb TAYLOK,
, _ Attorney »t Lxw.
st r«t ° VCr Re>BiL ' erVB #tt,re * Corsyth
I? A HAWKINS,
< ...? UOrDe > at Law
coi®t'hoL9e ealiey “ ulldln K opposite th
yyKLLMORNF.CLARo.JS,
tnu r , AUor . n «y at Law
’ l! * Lamar street. Americus. Ga
I A. ANSLEY, I
e» A. ANSLEY, jh. f Attorneys at I-avi
Americus, Ga.
t.racWJ^nm 1 - a *, t , entlon to the Bankruptcy
1 ra. tlce. Offite. H\n v bldg. near court house
EE..CATO, M. u.
• PHYSCIAN AND SURGEON.
Residence 3») Felder street. Telephone f 6
of rf A l inlr? loferfs ? Dal services to the
PeoP* e of Amfricus aud surroundine coun
ties. Special attention given to genera)
om?e r J>;.f iS r a V s of and cfildrln.
• , Jackson street. Cads left at Dr
tlon” I<l^e 8 St ° re rece^ve prompt atten
THE FLOWER OF FLOURS
henry clay.
1 am Sole Agent in Americus for
Henry Clay Flour, made in Lexington,
V.: and conceded the finest eyer sold
or market. Sold at
»v.- ail'd. Henry ( lay
any other market.
THE AMERICUS TIMES-RECORDER.
Christmas
From the dollar Brownie for the
. boys* and girls, up to the No. 5
1 Cartridge Codak, with its more
I expensive equipment. Every
size and style of Ivodak makes
an appropriate Christmas pres
ent. For the young folks there
can be nothing more fitting
nothing that will give more
pleasure or more instruction,
Amateur photography culti- ’
vates a taste for the beautiful
>n nature and in art. Jt teaches
observation; its influences are
all the highest and best. Put
a Kodak on your Christmas list.
Christmas Phonographs
Another very desirable present
1- a Talking Machine. I have
them from 85 to $l5O, All the
latest records in songs, operatic
selections, and talking speci
alties.
Christmas Piccytcs
In our bicycle department we
are still in the lead with the
solid Sterling “built like a
watch,” and the Crescent, “the
wheel that stand up.” Corres
pondence solicited. Catalogues
for the asking. Amateur pic
ture making a specialty.
WILL DUDLEY,
AMERICUS, GA.
The 0n1y....
J W BAILEY’S
New
Crop
Syrup.
Absolutely pure. Finest
flavor and brightest color ever
made Has no equal. In one
gallon and live gallon hermeti-
Acally sealed tin cans. Send
iga»rxKor« for a one gallon
II a _
AMERICUS. GA.. TUESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 25. 1900.
Just Received
1 num■■mi
A New Line of the
Crawford
Ladies’ FA
Shoes
j “Manish Lasts,” the very
Latest.
Patent
Leather
“Welts” '
Vici Kids.
""
Empire Shoe Store,
J. W. L. DANIEL. Mgr.
Forsyth Street. ‘Phone 105- 3 calls.
Business....
....Directory.
WHITLEY GROCERY CO.
Wholesale Grocers,
Agents:
BALLARDS OBELISK FLOUR.
LONG HORN TOBACCO.
AMERICUS FL'KNIIURE AND
' lr ~i l, ir a 7**riu I*"' ~ i
UNDIE IRTAKING COWPANY
C C HAWKINS, Manager.
j Dealers m
j Furniture, Coffins end
General Merchandise,
■ l'l» RT aKR if • EMBALMERS.
, z ■ '» t v*”'U-
Jii-1 deceived from
W—BBgßm—— WM
Landreth s I arm:
Rutabaga and all
Other varieties of
I TURNIP SEED.
DR. E. J. ELDRIDGE.
•I ickxi ii anil Lan ar Str . ts.
The Peoples Bank,
Americus, Ga.
Transacts a general banking busi
ness. Loans macle on approved securi
ty. Interest paid,on time deposits.
W H SOKMt NS,
Americls p
Grocery
Company#
Wholesale Grocers
AMKICICES anil ALBANY,
AMERICUS ICE FACTORY.
>i A NUE A OTXTBEIiS
PURE ICE.
Capacity twenty daily. Ordersprompt
ly filled, Correspondance solicited.
S R. SIHS. Prop.
JOHNSON & HARROLD,
t MERCHANTS.
AND DEALERS 1N....
HEAVY GROCERIES and FERTILIZERS,
Plantation Supplies Furnished
on Reasonable,Terrine.
Cash advanced on cottonin store at. lowest
current rates ot interest. 1 lowest
Save Money
BY
LOOKING
AT
McMATH BROS.,
Fine
School
Shoes
For Misses’ and Boys’. Also
Cheap Stiitj,
Umbrellas, Underwear, Etc,
McMATH BROS.
zzstransfer
telv |"~' rE VE WOOTEN has the only real!
J *~»nßet agency in the city. All
WOi 1° P ro uiptly it left at
agkiKp to 10 p m.
t' ■i ■: ■■ i'" io f t
T i'
/J
SyrufJigs
Actsr/e3S3ntfy andJivmptfy.
Cleanses the System
Gently and Effectually
when bilious or costive.
/resents in the most aceeptsbfe/brm
the Jns'ettire princip/es of piants
hnown to act most heneficia/7y.
TO GET ITS BENEFICIAL EFFECTS
BUY THE GENUINE MANFD. BY
CALIFORNIA FIG STRUPCO.
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.
LOUISVILLE ; KY. NEW YORK, N.Y
For sate by druggists price 50t per bottle.
Kodol
Dyspepsia Cure
Digests what you eat.
It artificially digests the food and aids
Nature in strengthening and recon
structing the exhausted digestive or
gans. It is the lat est discovereddigest
ant and tonic. No other preparation
can approach it in etllciency. It in
stantly relievesand permanently cures
Dyspepsia, Indigestion, Heartburn,
Flatulence, Sour Stomach, Nausea,
Sick Headache, Gastralgia,Cramps and
all other results of imperfect digestion.
Prlcesoc. ai'dgl. Large size contains 2% times
small size. Bookali aboutdyspepsiamaiiedfree
Prepared by E C DeWiTT aCO , Cij'cago.
W A HEMBERT,
AMEKICUS.'OA.
KIDI-UMis
■' I
most fatal of all dis*
eases. ?
rfii EV5$ K’DHEY CUBt Is o
FuLtl O Guaranteed Remedy
or money refunded. CcQtHins
remedies recognized by etui'
nent physicians as the folk
Kidney and Bladder troubles.
PRICE 50c. ami SLUO<
Davenport Drug Co
Lyy*'”w ed
wSi
PENNSYLVANIA PUKE KYE,
EIGHT YEARS OU).
OLD SHARPE WILLIAMS
FOUR FULL QUARTS OF THIS FINE
OLD PURE RYE.
EXPRESS
*P3’s°’ PREPAID.
We snip on approval In plain, sealed boxes,
with no marks to indicate contents. When
you receive it and test it, if it is not satlsfac
tory, return it at our expense and we will re
turn your «3.50. We guarantee this brand to
be eight years old. Kight bottles for t6.no,
express prepaid; 12 bottles for 19.50 expriss
prepaid; 1 gallon jug, express prepaid, «3.00;
2 gallon jug, express prepaid, if 0.50. No
charges for boxing.
We nandie all tne leading brands of Rye
and Bourbon Whiskies in the market, and
will save vou 50 ner cent, on vour purchases.
' g yuart. Gallon.
Kentuck Star Bourbon 25
Elkr’dge Bourbon
Coon Hollow Bourbon »“ *SO
Mellv, oud Pure Rye 50 1 .10
Monogram Kye ™ ~X-
Mcßrayer Rye • M
Rn kpr’s A A a A • • • •• ’ 6-1 Z 40
O. o. P. (Old Oscar Pepper).. (55 240
Old Crow 7a 2 50
Finches’Golden Wedding.... 75 275
Hoffman House Rye i( ° 3 OQ
Mount Vernon (8 years old).. 1 00 3 50
Old Dillinger (10 years 01d)... 12a 400
The above are only a few brands oi the
many we carry in stock. Send for catalogue.
All other goods by the gallon, such as Corn
Whiskey, Peach and Apple Brandies, etc,,
> sold equally as low, from 11,25 gallon up;
wards.
We make a specialty of the jug trade and
all orders by mail or telegraph will have our
prompt attention. Special, inducements of
fered.
The Altmayer &
Flatau Liquor Co.
orders shipped game Jday receipt of
order. *
506, 508, 508, 510, 512;Fourtk st.
Near Union-PassengelkDepot
Phone 265. I
Macon. -
Russell’s
Opposite .PostofTice, Americus, Ga.
GOOD Meals at Ladies
and gentlemen served promptly. Best
Rates"lowest. Fare]{the
STRIKING LIKENESS i
OF RUSSIA TO AMERICA
Instances of Resemblances
Between These Countries.
HER RAPID DEVELOPMENT
Russia’s Industrial Progress Is Due to
Her System of Eduration, Which la
Kashioned After That of the United
States—Other Foreign News.
St. Petersburg, Dec. 24.—Reflective
observers discover numerous resemb
lances between Russia aud America
which are uot accidental nor mere coin
cidences. One such resemblance is the
liberality of people of wealth toward
public institutions. This liberality, al
most foreign to the nations with which
Russia has borrowed most, is the
product, in part, of the same conditions
which have lavished private wealth upon
the American universities and technical
art schools.
Although Russia is tn some respects
going to school in America, she is able,
through the generosity of private citi
zens, to give lessons in some matters.
An instance is afforded by the Baron
Stieglitz School of Applied Arts in this
city. It could easily be taken as a model
by the patrons of the industrial arts in
the United States who are trying to re
unite the beautiful and useful.
This school was established in 1879
with an endowment of 10,000,000 roubles,
or more than $5,000,000, which was given
by the will of Baron Alexander Stieg
litz. The minister of finance assumed
the administration of this fund, the ac
tive management has been entrusted to
friends of art and to artists.
The school opened with small at
tendace and few classes in 1881. It has
been steadily growing and enlarging its
field ever since. The museum was
opened in 1896.
The buildings, which cost almost 1,-
000,000 roubles, are admirably adapted
to the purpose for which they are desig
nated. The school and the museum are
practically all under the same roof. The
school has 33 teachers and 300 students.
An annual exhibition of the work of the
school is given every January. The
plan of instruction is liberal.
There is a four years’ course in sci
ence and language, including religious
instruction, literature, elementary ge
ometry, the theory of shades and per
spective, Russian history, general his
tory and the history of the fine arts and
appliances, elementary chemistry and
technology, the methodics of drawing,
practical aesthetics and the French and
German languages.
Tne school is under the general direc
tion of M. Kotofif, and the museum is
under the charge of M. Oarbonier.
The result of this investment is that
instead of procuring all tlieir furniture
aud articles of vertdi and bric-a-brao
from France and England, as used to
be the case, the wealthy Russians are
now patronizing home talent to a large
extent. Side by side with the shops of
I imported goods may be found large at
eliers for every sort of decoration.
TWENTY PEOPLE INJURED
Engine Turned Over and the Cars
Jumped the Track.
Monterey, Mex., Dec. 24.—Particu
lars of a disastrous wreck of a north
bound passenger have just reached here.
The accident happened near Salraterna,
in the state of San Luis Potosi.
it The track spread and the engine turned
otT-.’. The sleeping car, which was filled
among them being a
number of*Mnericans, followed the ex
press and cars, and on top of
these were and second
class day coaches. »
Over 20 persons are reported to have
been injured. Engineer Dupree and
Conductor Wilson were painfully scald
ed.
Duke of Saxe-Weimar 111.
Weimar, Dec. 24. —Some anxiety is
felt regarding the health of the aged
Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar. He is
sulfering from influenza. A bulletin
issued by his physicians says his condi
tion is 'arisfaere.ry; mat he slept well in
spire of repeated spasms of coughing,
and that his tempera: ure is 99.7. The
grand duke was born 111 1818.
Canadians l-’or Police Duty.
Oitawa, D?c. 2+.—The gdenial office
is anxious to get as many Canadians as
possible to join Baden-Powell’s Trans
vaal mounted police. If 1,000 Cana
dians volunteer for this service it is the
intention o. the imperial government to
offer ten captaincies and 15 lieutenant
cies in the service to qualified officers of
the Canadian militia.
Lord r.eresiord Seriouslj- 11!.
London, Dec. 24. Lord William
Beresford is suffering from peritonitis.
This morning his condition is reported
as slightly improved. In consequence
of Lord Beresford’s illness the Christ
mas festivities at Deepdene, his seat at
Dorking, have been abandoned.
Fogs Interfere With Navigation.
London, Dec. 24.—Dense fogs on the
coasts are greatly interfering with nav
igation and several wrecks have oc
curred. The British steamer Bruns
wick grounded in the Bristol channel,
keeled over and sank. Seven of her
crew were drowned.
■Death of Baron Dormer.
London, Dee. 21—John Batiste Jo
seph Dorm r, twelfth Baron Dormer, is
dead, in the seven year of his age.
btomaeh Removed, He Still Lives.
Chattanooga, Dec. 24.—Although his
stomach was removed by the doctor, Al
bert Housdorf of this city, is still living,
and in ail probability he will recover.
About a mouth ago Housdorf, while
working as a machinist in a local .-hop,
sustained an internal injury which
caused him to suffer excruciating agony.
Dr. Berlin was called in and he saw that
it would require some heroic treatment
to save the man’s life. Housdorf was
removed to a hospital, where the opera
tion was performed.
KlLitig Near F lorence.
Florence, S. C., Dec. 24 —News has
been received here of the killing of Jack
Green by Boyd Pettigrew, near Tim
monsville, in this The two ne
gr<4es quarrelled about a woman. Pet
tigrew, as soon as he shot Green, took
woods aud is still at large. Both
HHpre drunk.
’ \ 15Hi idi-St o.aliter Ashore.
City, Dec. 24.—The British
steanWt* Antilla, Captain Moutella, from
Nassft for New York, with a general
cargoWjveiit ashore this morning on
Greutßgg Harbor bar. Her passengers
were
I GREATLY OVERDRAWN'
AND EXAGGERATED
What General Davis Says oi
William’s Statement’
SAYS THERE IS SUFFERING
Means of the Coffee Planters Reduced
by the Storm—Crop Damaged to the
Amount of $12,000,000 Treaty
Forwarded to London.
Washington, Dec. 24.—General Da
vis, when seen at the war department
concerning the report made public to
day by Dr. Williams, a contract surgeon
in the department of Porto Rico, setting
forth an appalling state of affairs among
the coffee planters in the island, said
that from his knowledge of affairs in
that section of Porto Rico, he should
characterize Dr. Williams’ statement as
much overdrawn and exaggerated.
That there was suffering in the coffee
plantings of the country, he had no
doubt. The heavy losses incurred by
the big hurricane, he said, could have
had no result other than to greatly re
duce the means of the planters who had
$12,000,000 worth of coffee swept away
by the big storm. When General Davis
was military governor of the island the
war department issued rations to the
people of Porto Rico, in order to help
weather over the evil effects of the hur
ricane.
When the government passed under
civil administration, however, the
issuance of the rations was discon
tinued, as it was believed the islanders
had sufficiently recovered. The general
said that Dr. Williams was acting as
sistant surgeon in the department and
accompanied a small expedition under
command of Major Watt, Fifth cavalry,
which on a march across the island trav
ersed the coffee plantation region. The
doctor reported a bed state of affairs in
this section in the way of sickness and
want of food and was asked for a fuller
report by General Davis. This was
turned over to Governor Allen.
CONGER SIGNS AGREEMENT
Close of the Most Important Phase of
the Negotiations.
Washington, Dec. 24.—Secretary Hay
has received a cablegram from Minister
Conger, at Peking, announcing that he
had signed the agreement reported by
the foreign ministers, but had done so
with a written explanatory statement
setting forth the exact position of his
government.
It is believed that the United Statei
also, while sanctioning the provisions of
the agreement relative to the mainten
ance of permanent lines of communica
tion, legation guards and prohibition of
the importation of arms into China, in
dicates clearly that constitutional rea
sons prevent the executive from making
any pledge to take part in the execution
of these plans.
The signature of the agreement by
the ministers closes what is regarded
here as the first, the most important
and the most difficult phase of the ne
gotiations as to China, for it is not
doubted that the Chinese envoys will
subscribe to the agreement without
amendment.
TREATY SENT TO LONDON
it Is Submitted Without Comment on
the Amendments.
Washington, Dec. 24.—The state de
partment decided to send the amend
ments to the Hay-Pauncefote treaty to
the British government today. The
state department will make no repre
sentation whatever as to the changes
made in the treaty; the senate amend
ments will be allowed to speak for them
selves, and the action of the department
in notifying them to the British govern
ment will be purely informal.
It is stated that there has been no ex
change whatever, either in the shape of
written notes or oral communications,
between the state department and the
governments of Nicaragua and Costa
Rica that has developed a threat on the
part of these governments to refuse as
sent to the construction of a canal in
view of the action of the United States
senate on the Hay-Pauncefote treaty.
United States Not Responsible.
Washington, Dec. 24.—The German
embassy has laid before the state de
partment the claims of a number of
German subjects for damages to their
interests in Cuba as a result of the Span
ish-American war and the insurrection
which led up to the war itself. This ac
tion of the German government has
raised a most important issue and the
department of state has given it tha
closest consideration. It has been con
cluded, however, that the United Stafef
government cannot accept responsibilit’
for the claims.
MacDonald Is Improving.
Washington, Dec. 24.—Samuel Mac-
Donald, the treasury clerk who shot and
killed Frank H. Morris, auditor for the
war department, Saturday, and then
attempted suicide, was reported to be
better today. Last night he had a sink
ing spell and it was thought at the hos
pital that he could not survive until
morning.
CHARLOTTE SHOWS BIG GAIN
Police Census Reveals a Discrepauzj’
of Over 1,000.
Charlotte, N. C., Dec. 24.—This city
showed a gain of over 50 per cent in
population by the federal census, the
city being rated at 18,091. The count
was restricted, of course, to the territory
within the city limits. The new cotton
mills and suburban towns built in the
past ten years join the city closely, be
ing divided only by the corporate lim
its, and while not dissatisfied with the
count of the government enumerators,
the city authorities ordered a police cen
sus which would take in the entire city.
This census has been completed and
shows a population of 27,752.
The police count inside the corporate
limits showed a gain of 1,811 over the
federal census.
Boat Sana; Both Drowned.
Tampa, Fla., Dec. 24.—The body of
W. H. Bigelow, who Las been missing
since last Wednesday, has been found
near Tarpon Springs. He went out in
a small boat with a negro and not re
turning search was made for them. It
is believed they overloaded the boat and
it sank, both being drowned.
its were badly mutilated by
* ‘I
jSt
■ .ggH
WILLIAMWARNER I
| IN A CONVICT’S GARB
Labor Leader Sent Up For As
sault on a Nonunion Man.
WILL SERVE SIX MONTHS!
1
With Him Were Five Others Convicted
and Sentenced For t he Same Otl’ense.
Pennsylvania Miners Are on Strike.
Claim a Violation of Agreement.
Baltimore, Dec. 24.—William War
ner, organizer of the United Mine Work
ers and leader in the recent miners’
strike in the Georges Creek district, en
tered the Maryland house of correction
yesterday to serve a term of six months’
imprisonment imposed upojjjjhim by the
courts of Allegany county lor participa
tion in an assault upon nonunion men
during the strike. With him were five
others convicted and sentenced for the
same offense, and six others are in
the Allegany jail for shorter terms.
Warner and his companions were
shaved, their hair was clipped short and
striped clothes put on them, as is the
case with ordinary malefactors.
Stringent efforts are being made to
induce Governor Smith to pardon War
ner, as it is generally believed that his
offense was more technical than actual,
his contention being that he was at
tempting to prevent the trouble rather
than inciting it, as was claimed by the
prosecuting attorney.
Miners on Strike.
Shamokin, Pa., Dec. 24. —The Enter
prise colliery, operated by W. L. Con
nell & Co of Scranton, was tied up
completely’ this morning by the 700 em
ployes going on a strike because a num
ber of miners had not paid their labor
ers the amounts the latter claimed were
due them in accordance with the 10 per
cent increase. The strikers say they
will not return to work until the com
pany either makes offending miners set
tle or discharges them.
Were Marched Out of Town.
Scranton, Pa., Dec. 21.—The strike
of the motormen and conductors of the
Scranton Street railway continued to
day. Ten men, who camo from Syra
cuse to take strikers’ places, were
marched out of tow n.
SMALLPOX IN KENTUCKY.
Death Rates Heavy—Conditions Seri
ous—Strict Quarantine In Force.
South Portsmouth, Ky., Dec. 24.—A
vigorous smallpox quarantine has gone
into effect in Greenup county. The sit
uation is said to be extremely dangerous.
There are several hundred cases aud the
death rate has been 20 per cent, the larg
est in the history of the disease in Ken
tucky. The state board of health has
ordered that every person in the county
shall be vaccinated.
Orders were received today by all
Chesapeake and Ohio railroad agents to
discontinue the sale of tickets aud to re
fuse all freight to or from the county.
Guards have been stationed to prevent
any one leaving the county. Several
persons have been stopped who at
tempted to cross the Ohio river in skiffs.
SHOT SHAW THROUGH HEAD.
He Was Accidentally Killed at Jasper
by a Friend.
Jasper, Ala., Dec. 24.—Graham Shaw,
a well known druggist of this city, was
accidentally shot and killed in Free
man’s drug stere by Guy Orear. Orear
and Ed Dilworth were standing behind
the prescription counter looking at their
pistols.
In making change, Mr. FilSeman, pro
prietor of the establishment, dropped 30
cents and Mr. Shaw stooped to pick it
up. Young Orear snapped his pistol at
the floor, but Mr. Shaw being in a
stooping position received the bullet
just under the heart, ■which produced
death in less than ten minutes.
Tramps Sant to State Prison. r
Birmingham, Ala., Dec. 24.—Thirty
six prisoners rrom Butler, Escampiaand
Mobile counties passed through here
enroute to the state penitentiary at
Pratt mines. The majority of these men
had been convicted for violating an act
of the legislature passed in 1898, which
prohibits stealing rides on railroad trains
in this state. Their sentences ranged
from four to eight months. Most of
them were white men from various
parts of the country.
Murdered and Robbed.
Louisville, Dec. 24.—John Happle
man, night watchman for the Green
River Asphalt company, was murdered
and robbed at the company's plant in
this city early Sunday morning. His
body was found yesterday with his skull
crushed in and his pockets rifled of his
wages, which had been paid him the
night before. Five men, who are
peered of being implicated in the crjK^ s
are under arrest. P e >
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DRAGGED FROM HOME;
MAY HAVE BEEN KILLED
Evidences of SeveA Struggle
In the House.
TAKEN TOWARD RIVER
Young Lady Left at Home Alone Dis
appeared During Her Sister’s Ab
sence—Posse is Searching For the
Criminal—Cudahy Kidnaping.
Pueblo, Colo., Dec. 24.—Maggie Hoel
has been missing since about 3 o’clock
Saturday afternoon and it is feared that
she has been murdered.
The girl, who was about 18 years old,
lived with her sister, Mrs. Charles
Beatty, in a lonely spot about 37 miles
west of the city. On Saturday Mrs.
Beatty left Maggie in charge of her lit
tle child at her home. Upon her return
two hours later her sister was gone and
the baby was alone in the house.
Indications about She premises led to
the immediate suspicion that the girl
had been taken from htr home by force.
There were evidences of a struggle and
in the yard were feund the foot
of a man evidently of large silWHWui
weight. The foot prints led to the di
rection of the Arkansas river and at
some places along the trail appeared the
E tints of smaller shoes such as Maggi« L
loel wore. At other places the trail in-11
dicated that the girl was dragged or car- ”
ried along by her captors.
Near the river bank where the ground
is harder all traces were lost.
A lango number of men have been
searching, but the girl has not yet been
found. At Mrs. Beattv’s home Mag- t
gie’s hat and the wrap which she ordi
narily wore out of doors were found ytf
disturbed.
In the immediate vicinity a large force
of men have been working on reservoirs
now under construction.
HAS IDENTIFIED PAT CROWE
He Is the Man Who Made Inquiries
About Cudahy.
Omaha, Dec. 24.—A man whose name
the police refuse to reveal has identified
Pat Crowe as the light complexioned in
dividual in company with a wo
man, accosted him in the vicinity of the
robbers’ rendezvous relative to the own
ership of the house to which young Ed>>
ward Cudahy was carried by
last Thursday night.
When shown a picture taft'en from the
rogue’s gallery of Crowe Chis man stated
positively that it was a jierfect likeness
of the man he saw at Thirty-sixth and
r Grover streets. Questioned closely as
to the man’s conduct, his manner and
general description, he gave a detailed
statement which convinces the authori
ties that they are on the right track.
The man states that while negotiating
for the renting of the house with the
man supposed to be Crowe he made
sufficient note of his personal appear
ance as to be absolutely certain as to the
identifications.
Boy Kidnaped.
Kalamazoo, Mich., Dec. 24.—Hobart
Clay berg, a 17-year-old boy, whose fa
ther, John B. Clay berg, is a promment
H-b-na, Mon..
ent ' '
Res I**
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. ' <I 11 1
NO. 211.

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