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Americus times-recorder. [volume] (Americus, Ga.) 1891-current, December 27, 1900, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89053204/1900-12-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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twenty-second yeak.
IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT
GOING OUT OF BUSINESS.
After eighteen years or close confinement
in the Dry Goods business, I have decid=
ed to make a change. My entire line of
|)rv Goods, Clothing, Shoes. Hats
*■
and Gents’ Furnishing Goods
will be thrown upon the market Monday
morning at SACRIFICE PRICES to close
out for CASH.
I could no doubt sell this entire stock
in bulk, but prefer to give my customers
and friends who have traded with me in
the past, the benefit of this opportunity
• to supply their wants at
COST!
for a time. 1 have no old goods or trashy
I stock to palm off on the public, for you
* all know I have been in business only a
short time since my separation from the
old firm.
Everything must be sold sold as
rapidly as possibly, for the shorter the
sale, the less the expense. Come at once
and get some of the big bargains in Dress
Goods, Silks, Velvets, Woolens, Clothing
for Tien and Boys, Shoes, Hatsand Caps,
Gents’ Furnishing Goods, Table Linens,
Towels, Hosiery, Handkerchiefs, Gloves,
Ladies’, Gents’ and Children’s Under
wear, Shirts, Overcoats, Umbrellas, Do
mestics, Notions of all kinds, Ladies’
Capes and Jackets, (all new), and in fact
everything in the store must go
Regardless of Prices!
Now is your chance! Comeat once
and trade with confidence, and you will
be accorded the same fair treatment you
have always received at my store.
Yours to close out,
Lee Aullexx,
“All The World a Lover Loves.”
Is a truism as old as love itself, and all lovers of the
beautiful and artistic in HOLIDAY GOODS can please
their loved ones by selecting presents from our superb stock
Never before have we carried such a magnificent line oi
Christmas goods, and the most fastidious can get what they
want here. In Toilet Sets, Cut-Glass goods, Shaving Sets,
Portfolios, Leather Goods, Manicure Sets, Fine Vases, etc.
Our line excels all others. Buy RIM a handsome Meer
schaum Pipe, in the smoke of which he can conjure up
visions of his “angel.” Buy HER that superb Toilet Set
and your case is won. At all events go to
.1. R. HUDSON’S For Christmas Goods.
professional cards-
W. T. Lank . R L Maynard
LANE & MAYNARD,
LAWYERS-
AMERICUS, : GEORGIA.
Offleys Nos. 15 and 17 Planters Bank Build
ing. *
iyt PETER F. BAHNSEN,
Veterinary Surgeon.
Office at Turpin Bros, or G. O. Loving s
stables.
DR. B. B. HUDSON,
»HY’SICIAN AND SURGEON'
Tenders' professional services to the pul -
He. CallsMeft at Hudson’s drug store w>l.
receive vromvt attention.
YAMEN lATLOK,
fl Attorney at Law.
Office over Rembert’s In ug store, Forsyth
street
I? A. HAWKINS,
L. Attorney at Law.
Office in Wheatley Building opposite th
courthouse
WELLBORN F. CLALtn.E,
Attorney at Law
Sil* Lamar Street. Americus, ua
rJ t /nsL^Y,’jr. 1 Attorneys at Law
Americus, Ga.
Give special attention to the Bankruptcy
practice. Office. Bvne bldg, near court house
KE. CATO, M. u.
. PHY’SCI AN AND SURGEON.
Residence 330 Felder street. Telephone 96
Tenders his professional services to the
people ot Americus and surrounding coun
ties. Special attention given to general
surgery, diseases of women and children.
Office 4tto)4 Jackson street. Cails left at Dr
Eldridge’s store wl! 1 receive prompt atten
tion
JHE FLOWER OF FLOURS
—Os—-
HENRY CLAY.
I am Sole Agent in Americus for
K Henry Clay Flour, made in Lexington,
BfeaT.: ami conceded the liuest eyer sold
or any other market. Sold at
lrv (1; o
THE AMERICUS TIMES-RECORDER.
Chr/slmas Jfodackp
From the dollar Brownie for the
boys aud girls, up to the No. 5
Cartridge Codak, with its more
expensive equipment. Every
size and style of Kodak makes
an appropriate Christmas pres
ent. For the young folks there
can be nothing more fitting—
nothing that will give more
pleasure or more instruction.
Amateur photography culti
vates a taste for the beautiful
iu nature aud in art. It teaches
observation; its influences are
all the highest and best. Put
a Kodak on your Christmas list.
Christmas iPhonoaraphs
Another very desirable present
i> a Talking Machine. I have
them from $5 to $l5O. All the
latest records in songs, operatic
selections, aud talking speci
alties.
Christmas CSiccyies
In our bicycle department we
are still in the lead with the
solid Sterling “built like a
watch,” and the Crescent, “the
wheel that stand up.” Corres
pondence solicited. Catalogues
for the asking. Amateur pic
ture making a specialty.
WILL DUDLEY,
AMERICUS, GA.
The 0n1y....
J W BAILEY’S
New
Crop
Syrup.
Absolutely pure, Finest
flavor and brightest color ever
made Has no equal. In one
gallon aud live gallon hermeti
cally sealed tin cans. Send
a one gallon
AMERICUS. GA., THURSDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 27. (900.
Just Received
A New Line of the
Crawford
Ladies’ rO
Shoes
“Manish Lasts,’’ the very I
Latest.
Patent
Leather
“Welts’’
Vici Kids.
Empire Shoe Store,
.1. W. L. DANIEL, Mgr.
Forsyth Street. ‘Phone 1<)5 —3 calif.
Business....
....Directory.
WHITLEY GROCERY CO.
Wholesale Grocers,
Agents:
BALLARDS OBELISK FLOUR.
LONG HORN TOBACCO.
AMERICUS FUKNIIURE ANO
UNDERTAKING COMPANY
<■ m? .r- <liWl IKI C.'.ICW
C C HAWKINS, Manager.
Dealer', tn
Furniture* Coffins and
General Merchandise,
.• i» RTAKE -• R SfUALMBBS.
Olton O VS’ u<’
Just Rcceiv-d Irani
Landreth s I arm:
Rutabaga and all
Other varieties of
TURNIP SEED.
DR. E. J. ELDRIDGE.
>1 icksc.u and I.an ar Str ■« Is. ,
The Peoples Bank,
Americus, Ga.
Transacts a general banking busi
ness. Loans made on approved securi
ty. Interest paid on time deposits,
W H SIMMONS,
Americus
Grocery
Company®
Wholesale Grocers
AMKKICUS and ALB ANY.
AMERICUS ICE FACTORY.
MANUFACTURERS
PURE ICE.
Capacity twenty daily. Orders prompt
ly tilled, Correspondance solicited.
S. R. sins. Prop.
JOHNSON & HARROLD,
liOh Ull!9 wi H
MERCHANTS.
AND DEALERS IN-
HEAVY GROCERIES and FERTILIZERS,
Plantation Supplies Furnished
on Keasonable.Terrms.
Cash advanced on cottonin store at- lowest
current rates ot interest.
SaveNloney
BY
LOOKING
AT
McMATH BROS.,
Fine
School
Shoes
For Misses' and Boys’. Also
Cheap Stirs-s,
Umbrellas, Underwear, Etc,
McMATH BROS.
WOOTEN has the only reall
agency lathe city AU
iMfc&.-le' l to p.'ouiptl-, 1! |f!t
Kg fr— .1 ■ 1
■BOi
7 is
SyrlpFigs
Acfsf/e&MlJtfy andfivmptfy.
Cleanses the System
Gently and Effectually
when bilious or costive.
/resents in the most acceptabfeform
the Jarcative principles of plants
Jin own to act most beneficiafip:
TO GET ITS BENEFICIAL EFFECTS
BUY THE GENUINE MANFD. BY
CALIFORNIA FIG STRUPCO.
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.
LOUISVILLE , KY. NEW YORK, N.Y.
for sate by druggists price 50$ per bottle,
Kodol
Dyspepsia Cure
Digests what yon eat.
It artificially digests the food and aids
Nature in strengthening aud recon
structing the exhausted digestive or
gans. It is the latest discovereddigest
ant and tonic. No other preparation
can approach It in efficiency. It in
stantly relieves and permanently cures
Dyspepsia, Indigestion, Heartburn,
Flatulence, Sour Stomach, Nausea,
Sick Headache, Gastralgia.Crampsand
all other results of imperfect digestion.
PriceSOc and SI. Large size contains 2% times
small size. Book a! 1 aboutdyspepsiama.iledfree
Prepared by C C DeWiTT & CO.. Cb'cagO-
W. A REMBERT.
AMERICUS.'OA.
KIDNEY DISEASES
most fatal of all dis
eases,
rni KIDNEY CURE Is a
rULX I d Guaranteed Remedy
or money refunded. <Contains
remedies recognized by emi
nent physicians as the for
Kidney and Bladder troublesx
PRICE 50c. and $1.00,.
Davenport Drug Co
RETI Fl ID
EhEh
PI F!
PENNSYLVANIA PUKE RYE,
EIGHT YEARS OLD.
OLD SHARPE WILLIAMS
FOUR FULL QUARTS OF THIS FINE
OLD PURE RYE.
£ EXPRESS
PREPAID.
We snip on approval In plain, sealed boxes,
with no marks to Indicate contents. When
you receive it and test It, if it is not satisfac
tory, return It at our expense and we will re
turn your $3.50. We guarantee this brand to
be eight years old. Eight bottles for $6.50,
express prepaid; 12 bottles for 19.50 express
prepaid; 1 gallon jug, express prepaid, $3.00;
2 gallon lug, express prepaid, $5.50. No
charges for boxing.
We nandie ail tne leading brands of Rye
and Bourbon Whiskies In the market, and
will save you 50 tier cent, on vour purchases,
lyuart. Gallon.
Kentuck Star Bourbon $35 $125
Bourbon 40 F l5O
Coon Hollow Bourbon 45 1 60
Mellv,ood Pure Rye 50 190
Monogram Rye 55 2 00
Mcßrayer Rve 'io 2 25
Baker’s AAaA 65 2 40
O. O. P. (Old Oscar Pepper).. 65 240
Old Crow 75 2 50
Finches’ Golden Wedding.... 75 2 75
Hoffman House Rye 90 3 00
Mount Vernon (8 years old).. 1 00 3 50
Old Dillinger (10 years 01d)... 125 400
The above are only a tew brands ot the
many we carry in stock. Send for catalogue.
All other goods by the gallon, such as Corn
Whiskey, Peach and Apple Brandies, etc,,
sold equally as low, from $1,25 gallon
wards.
We make a specialty of the jug trade and
all orders by mail or telegraph will have our
prompt attention. Special, Inducements of
fered.
The Altmayer &
Flatau Liquor Co.
orders shipped same Jday receipt of
order.
506, 508, 508, 510, 512;F0u(
Near Union-Passer
Phone 265a
Macon. - • Gew
Russell’s
* W
RIOTING NEGROES
ARE UNDER CONTROL
No Further Trouble Expected
at Cementville.
CHRISTMAS CASUALTIES
Chapter of Murders and Accidents.
Two Killings In Birmingham—Fa
talities lu Savannah —Bloodshed at
Other Places—An Explosion.
Cementville, Ind., Dec. 2(». The
warring negroes are under control to
day and no further outbreaks are ex
pected.
Sain Kendall, in whose saloon a num
ber of shots were fired, went to Jeffer
sonville and secured warrants for the
arrest of Lee Ranger, who was wounded,
and John Redmond, his companion, but
neither was found. Had an attempt
been made yesterday to repeat the
scenes of Christmas eve, blood would
have been shed, daylight giving the
whites an opportunity for concentrated
action.
HE KILLED AN IMBECILE
Aeklin Miot to Death by Jackson
Near Carrollton.
Carrollton', Ga., Dec. 26. Tom
Aeklin was killed by James Jackson, a
farmer, 3 miles from here. Aeklin has
been an imbecile ever since his major
ity. He attended a Christmas tree,
after which he started for the home of
his broil)er. On the way, it is said, he
made attempts to gain entrance into
several houses. Stopping at the home
of young Jackson, he was making a
noise about the entrance to the house
when Jackson spoke to him to know
who it was, and failing to get any re
ply, Jackson fired in the direction of
the noise. The shot took effect when
Jackson was horrified to learn that he
had killed Aeklin.
SHOOTING AFFRAY IN MACON
Negro Fires Into a House and is Seri
ously Wounded.
Macon, Dec. 26.—A drunken negro
named Elbert Hendrick viciously at
tacked the house of Mrs. Lena Dixon.
Hendrick’s wife did cooking for Mrs.
Dixon. He had gone to the place to de
mand that she go with him and she re
fused, whereupon he threw stones at the
bouse and shot into it.
Mrs. Dixon emptied a pistol out of the
window, shooting Hendrick in the head
and arms. Her firing and screams
aroused some young white men iu the
vicinity and they rushed to the rescue.
They headed off the negro and one of
them, Tobe Amason, was shot by some
one. He was hit twice, the most serious
wound being in the stomach.
MOTHER KILLED BY A SHOCK
Bearing of Her Soil’s Death Mrs.
C'anan Falls Dead.
Bryan, 0., Dec. 26.—News of an
affair in Williams county which cost
three lives has just reached here. Wayne
Crowell, aged 24, and Charles Canan,
aged 21, left their-homes last night for
Blakeslee, where they were to attend a
Christmas dance, in crossing the Wab
ash railroad tracks near that place they
were struck by a passenger train aud
both were instantly killed.
Mrs. Canan was notified of the acci
dent and the shock was so severe that
it caused her deoth.
Two Negroes Killed In Savannah.
Savannah, Dec."*2(\—Christmas in
Savannah resulted m the usual number
of broils, some of which proved fatal.
Daniel Smalls, a negro, was found dead
in the western part of the city, with a
bullet hole through his head. Walter
Jones was killed last night by Tom Jen
kins, being fatally stabbed as a result of
a drunken dispute. A number of others
have been badly cut and shot, and sev
eral of them are expected to die. There
were eight cutting scrapes, in some of
which the participants were white.
Brained With a Coal Pick.
Pratt City, Ala., Deo. 26. —The body
of Shepperd Irvine, a negro convict at
slope No. 2, was found in the mines
with his beams eluding. He had been
murdered with a coal pick. John Sims,
another negro eonvict. is charged with
the murder. Irvine, by working over
time, had earned a few dollars which he
kept secreted in a blacking box tinder
his bunk. The evidence tends to show
that Sims killed him for the purpose of
securing this money.
Killed By an Explosion.
High Shoals, Ga., Dec. 26. —While
Leonard Earnest was loading an old
cannon that had been made out of an
old shaft it was accidentally discharged
and struck him under the chin, tearing
it all to pieces, breaking every bone,
knocking every tooth out of his mouth
and splitting his nose. It is supposed
the powder caught from fire that
dropped from the cigar he was smoking
at the time. Little hope is entertained
of nis recovery.
Knocked Overboard end Drowned.
Columbus, Ga., Dec. 26.—The steamer
Kelley lost Charles Barber, a negro
man, overboard on her last trip. The
accident occurred between Blounttown
and Bristol. He was going along the
port guard, aud as he was about to
the forecastle ti>‘ lire screens,
wind; w.t; flapping i 1 thiflMMM

yawl to
nothing was seen of A t
South N. uk. Jgfc-X
John Kelly, ,11
aged 10, were <lr<’>wjEr_.
skating on the 'U
Northwest J
through and
Kelly bov. 1
Ay ,.,s< ,
IS MARVELOUSLYJEM

' 1 ■'
! BRITISH MAY SECEDE
1 FROM ALLY COMMAND
;
Irritated By the Activity of
Germans In Their District.
CONDITIONS IN PEKING
American and Japanese Quarters Are
Best Managed—Looting By the Ger
man Troops Continues—Country Peo
ple Robbed of Their Produce.
Peking, Dec. 26. Much irritation
has been caused by the activity of the
German troops in-the districts under
British protection. So acute has been
the feeling that there has been a ques
tion of the British seceding from the
ally command.
Foreign Office Makes Denial.
London, Dec. 26.—The foreign office
stated today that there is no truth in
the Peking dispatch which says there
has been a question of the British seced
ing from the allied command owing to
the activity of the Germans in the dis
tricts under British protection.
French Disperse Chinese.
Berlin, Dec. 26. Field Marshal
Count Von Waldersee, in a dispatch
patch from Peking, says: “The French
troops encountered Dec. 22, east of Cho
chan, between Peking and Pao-Ting-Fu,
a Chinese force numbering 2,500 men
with artillery. The Chinese fled in the
direction of Kuan-Hsien. They suffered
heavv losses and left behind them five
aud four cannon. The Chinese
probably consisted of the reunited rem
nants of a body already dispersed.”
ORDER IN AMERICAN SECTION
Conditions lu Peking as Seen By a
Newspaper Man.
London, Dec. 26.—1 n the course of a
review published iu The Morning Post
today of the conditions existing at Pe
king, H. J. Whigham, the well known
newspaper correspondent, says there are
now 250,000 inhabitants pursuing their
ordinary avocations in the American
quarter. He adds that the American
and Japanese quarters are in all re
spects the best managed, “showing
ability on the part of the American? to
handle a subject people which have not
developed elsewhere to proper advant
age.” Continuing Mr. Whigham says:
“This enormous portion of the city is
policed by exactly one company of in
fantry and a few mounted men under a
provost marshal. If only these hard
hearted soldiers of the provost marshal
type had had a free hand in the Philip
pines the task of subjugating the un
fortunate islanders would have been
much more simple. If the Japanese
have come out of the muddle with flying
colors they at least have the Americans
close behind. It was worth sending an
expedition to China if only to get a few
hints on transport from the Americans.
Their scheme of municipal government
could not be bettered by the British, who
have learned the business by experience
in every quarter of the globe.
“For the point of contrast it is only
necessary to walk down the avenues of
the Chinese city dividing the United
States and Germany. The American
side of the street is simply Peking, in
the ordinary garb of peace, minus its
variegated smells. The opposite side is
almost deserted. The Germans have
come to the American side for meat and
vegetables aud it is whispered that the
country people are sometimes robbed as
they are bringing in the produce, ex
cept where the gates are British, Amer
ican or Japanese. It is why the markets
in the quarters controlled by these na
tions are the best.”
Reviewed the Egyptian Troops.
Khartoum, Egyptian Soudan, Dec.
26.—Lord Cromer the diplomatic agent,
reviewed the Egyptian troops of the
Soudan under the sirdar, Major General
Sir Francis R. Wingate, today. He as
sured a deputation from the Dinka
tribe, which complained of slave raids,
that the British and Egyptian flags
guaranteed them against a recurrence
of such raids and insured respect for
their ancient customs. The chiefs de
parted expressing gratitude.
Lord Roberts at Funchal.
Funchal, Island of Maderi, Dec. 26.
The steamer Canada, with Lord Roberts
on board, arrived here last evening, re
ceiving a salute of 19 guns on reaching
the port. This morning Lord Roberts
was tendered an official reception by the
authorities and at noon on board the
Canada he proceeded to Gibraltar.
SURRENDERED HIS OFFICE
[ Attorney Asa Bird Gardiner Retires
l Under Protest.
I New York, Dec. 26. —Eugene Phil
; bin, who last week was appointed dis-
• trict attorney of New York county, as-.
I sumed the duties of the office today,
t Asa Bird Gardner surrendered his office
» under protest. He said to his successor:
1 “I would like it to be clearly unejer
stbod that I do not voluntarily surren
der this office and that I protest against
the action of the governor as being
r without authority in law. lam anxious
} whilst protesting against this act and
reserving all my legal rights, that the
3 public business shall not be injured nor
1 retarded aud to that end I will be
J pleased to co-operate with you in any
> way you think best in the public inter-
*■ i,v

WORK OF THE PORTO
RICO LEGISLATURE
Important Measures Give
to Minor Matters.
LACK EXPERIENCE
Bills Providing For Woman Suffrage
Introduced lu the Lower House—An
other to Legalize Cockiighting—How
the Measures Are Presented.
San Juan, Porto Rieo, Dec. 26.—The
legislative assembly of Po.ito Rico has
been in session since Dee. 3, when the
house of delegates was duly organized.
The house has been holding daily 4-
hour sessions. Over 45 bills have been
introduced and no end of motions and
ameua.iients. But one bill has been
passed. By law the assembly is allowed
60 days in which to complete their ses
sions. Fifteen days have passed and
next to nothing has been accomplished,
and the local papers are suggesting that
it is about time something had been
done. The house is badly in need of a
competent force of translators aud clerlre.
There seems to be no system.
Bills are prepared and introduced cov
ering most common matters, and in a
manner most unbusinesslike. Few of
the Lilis are m proper form, many have
been filed written <n pencil on a sheet
torn from a swatch pad. Most of the
bills are written during the session and
are more iu the form of suggestions
than of projected laws. An inspiration
may come to a member, he picks up a
pad or draws au envelope or a scrap of
paper from his pocket, jots down a few
sentences and presents the “document”
as a bill, and it is duly filed. Instead of
getting down to the crying need of
Porto Rico —a revision of the laws; bills
to enact such laws as these are drawn
up ami introduced:
“To establish woman suffrage and to
give women preference over men in
public positions for which they are com
petent;’’ “Relating to salaries of school
teachers;” “Relating to contracts made
in provincial currency;” “Covering the
profession of pharmacy.”
A resolution was presented to “legal
ize the sport of cock fighting” by the
same member who is the author of the
woman suffrage bill.
At yesterday’s session the committee
on rules reported that bills relating to
the following matters should have pref
erence over all other business:
Insular police, salaries, police courts,
loans, telegraphs and railroads.
On motion mortgages was added to
the list aud the report was adopted.
The council passed a bill introducing
the jury system, but it was defeated in
the house by a vote of 15 to 12. Several
members claimed that the bill was not
properly translated from the English
original. The bill was ordered to be
translated and will be reconsidered.
The exectivw council is daily holding
“secret executive sessions” behind closed
doors. These are for the purpose of
considering franchises and other mat
ters over which the council has exclu
sive jurisdiction. The public is not in
formed of the nature of these
At present it does not seem probable
that the lower house will be a success
as a lawmaking body.
BOTH SIDES ARE CONFIDENT
Anti-Quay Faction Will Again Try to
Deadlock the Legislature.
Harrisburg, Dec. 26.—New Year’s
day is to mark the opening of the fight
between the Quay and anti-Quay fac
tions over the vacant Pennsylvania sen
atorship. While the Philadelphia news
papers, with one exception, are crying
out that Senator Quay is sure to be
beaten, the best advices indicate the
contrary.
The legislature is to convene on the
first day of the new year and there is to
be a repetition of the convention of
1895, when the state capital was crowded
with bands and clubs and shouters of
both factions, who fought to influence
the act of the legislators.
While the Quay people are claiming
wirh confidence that they are going to
win out, the anti Quay people are just
as certain that they are going to dead
lock the legislature as they did before
and thus prevent an election. The anti-
Quay Republicans seem to have a com
plete understanding with the Democrats
to the extent at least that the Democrats
will not vote for Quay. This does not
go so far, however, as to insure Demo
cratic votes for Wanamaker or whoever
may be the “reform” candidate for the
office, but the Democratic plan seems to
be to vote for a Democrat and if possi
ble force the “reform” Republicans to
come to their assistance.
Will Be Tried Jan. 9.
New York, Dec. 26.—The trial of
Cornelius L. Alvord, Jr., the defaulting
note teller of the First National bank,
which was set for trial today in the
United States circuit court, was post
poned until Jan. 9. Judge Thomas,
who is to preside at the trial, is obliged
to sit in Brooklyn this week and he de
cided not to hold court in this district
until next month. <
WHY COUGH
Dr. Bull’s Cough Syrup cures Cough
or Cold at once. Conquers Croup,
Whooping-Cough and Measle-Cough
without fail. All mothers praise it.
Doctors prescribe it for Bronchitis,
Hoarseness, Grippe, Pneumonia and
Consumption. Quick, sure results.
Price, 25 cents. Refuse the'dealer’s substitute.
T>r.Bull’s
' SYRUP
NO. 212.
»T f
ff Wa®W
a
A shoe that doesn’t fit is unfit to wear.
It may be ever so stylish- built along
the latest lines—and yet bind and pinch
and cause you agony.
We are experienced in the art of fit
ting feet. Our shoes are lacking in
none of the three qualities which all
good shoes should have 'bo’miort,
'urability and style.
All the new fall lines are ready.
Schxxmpert Shoe Co,
WiLD flurry in
THE STOCK MARKET
Opening Was Higher With aa
Accumulation of Orders.
LARGE SALES RECORDED
Brooklyn Transit, Sugar, Tenneaseu
Coal and Others Led the Upward
Movement After Reaching th«
Highest Point the Stocks Receded.
New York, Dec. 26.—There was an
other wild and excited opening in thu
stock market today, the result of ac
cumulated orders, the effects of th«
three days’ suspension of active trading
in stocks.
There was a very large attendance oi
brokers on the floor, as periods like thii
is the heyday of tho stock broker’s for
tune and he has enough business in a
few hours to compensate for many
months of idleness and apathy, whil«
the public refrain from having anything
to do with stocks.
The interval since Saturday’s ex Ited
and buoyant close ia the stock market
has been utilized in all the usual haunts
of speculators and traders to exchange
all sorts of rumors of important new de
velopments affecting the valttv
and without restraining
actual money prices to establish ShaWE
status of these rumors and in the
lous mood of the speculative public a
these rumors had spread and grown.
The consequence was a wild rush to
buy a number of special stocks at the J
opening. The opening of these was
sational and the sympathetic effect ojMk
the general list was buoyant. But tlB
action of the market after the
served to disclose the
that while the appetite of those p
.■ had been whetted to a
r- were not |
■■--ry la rm.-amounts of
■ 0:1/ and anxious ufl - i
i- he- 1-v lof j
were sceptical of £
their stocks or thee were satisfied
if true, the pricey offered for the stocki
fairly represented the enhancement of
values.
\J>re Some Abrupt Losses
There were some abrupt losses of the
large priced gains. The most sensa
tional movement at the opening was-in
Brooklyn Transit,in which buying orders
were executed for 9,200 shares as the
chairman’s gavel fell. The excited bid
ding ran the price to 88%, which was
5% over Saturday’s price, but at the
same instant other brokers in other
parts of the same crowd were buying ‘
the stock for 2% points lower at 86. Su
gar, St. Paul, Tennessee coal,Vise first
preferred, Atchison and sor36 ** ‘jc
stocks also had “wide” openings,
spread sometimes reaching 1 point or
over, and-the congestion of buying or
ders leading to simultaneous selling of
4,000, 5,000, 6,000 and 8,000 share blocks.
Some of the opening gains were:
nessee coal, 5%; Sugar, 3%; St.
2 J 4 ; American Tobacco, 2%;
2’- 8 ; Kansas and Texas, 2' 4 ; St.
and S■.iislnvi-tern preferred, 2%. |H®|
may stocks from lo t 2 points.
Tiie weakness of Northern Pacit|®S®s
.i.i important influence m cau.<d®9®s!
break from the opening prices. }'
■ •ntiy authentic denials were miflHH®
of any inn ntion to retire the
<fock January 1. A
. tm- edg'- off
■ pag; Rest'* Wb
,nred ‘ . Oferfli
fia I " $ ‘
■ .
v - i! ‘* JH -S r 1 -111
y ■;
: .'-® k'o** *>■ 1
ifflE I X/'
- - K ! M
_.QI X'4' I ’ I

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