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Trench and camp. [volume] (Augusta, Ga.) 1917-1919, October 24, 1917, Image 13

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Oct. 24, 1917.
BRAIN MUST WIN
WAR FOR U. S„
LANE DECLARES
Secretary of Interior Found
No Slackers in Nation-Wide
Tour.
Philadelphia, Pa. —Franklin K. Lane,
secretary of the interior, aroused the
members of the Philadelphia Chamber of
Commerce to a high pitch of enthusiasm
and determined effort to get behind the
Second Liberty Loan, so far as indus
trial and commercial Philadelphia was
concerned, at a luncheon in the ballroom
of the Bellevue-Stratford.
Secretary Lane said:
“In making a trip through the United
States as a journey of curiosity I wanted
to find out if the reports coming to Wash
ington were true. You all know the physi
cal situation of Washington—we are in
a cup, and all the murmurings and va
porings of the country drift into that
cup, making it impossible to appreciate
the situation unless you get out on the
hilltops and plains. And so I have made
a four weeks’ trip to all those parts of
the land whence came rumors of disloy
alty or lack of courage.
Found No Slackers. •
—“I went to find slackers, and I found
no such men. From the Atlantic to the
Pacific the spirit is the same as here.
In Oklahoma, which had been spoken
of as the center of disaffection, I found
a town of five thousand inhabitants which
had subscribed ",000 for Liberty Bonds,
and in addition *. A.hat it subscribed $lB,-
000 to the
"I review«fe,°<, * ousand of our new
army at Safo/VA Z)’ty. They had just
had two nfo-i .o, 4>.‘ing. The grandson
of Brigha/j ° v lood beside me, and
atvhis coff (/■■> g past he said: “Ev
ery mart %S> a 'tnpany has bought a
Liberty
"I four-“Achother thing that pleased
me—l found that the people of the United
States are right in their appraisement of
their commander-in-chief; that every
where President Wilson has the entire
confidence~of the people, regardless of
politics.”
In speaking of the enemy, he declared:
“The offense of Germany lies not in
her deeds, but in the fact that she per
mits herself to be dominated by the spirit
of militarism and absolute power, and
once that spirit is overwhelmed there is
no doubt that the better Germany we
have known will come through.” .
Regarding our progress in the war he
said:
“1 have heard people say, 'Why have we
not a million men in France?”
“Where are the ships to carry their
munitions—their supplies? Each man re
quires fifty pounds of tonnage a day, arid
where will we get that tonnage’
The answer to this is, 'Why didn’t you
get ships?’
..^ ar «£ ound U ’ S ' Empty Handed.
bor fifty years the American flag has
been Virtually off the ocean. Our money
has been put out at high rates of inter
eet in railways, street car lines, factories
and huge buildings. When the war came
we were empty handed.”
PERSHING’S GOOD-ANGEL.
(Pittsburg Leader).
Miss Catherine C. Skurkay today is
probably the happiest girl in Monessen
General Pershing, commander of the
American expeditionary forces in
France, has sent her a letter in which
he expressed his thanks for a poem
written for and dedicated to him and
his army.
Miss Srukay, who is well known in
Monessen, today is the envy of all her
friends.
THE RED, WHITE AND BLUE.
By Miss Catharine C. Skukay.
‘I
Here’s to our country, the red, white
'and blue.
I am lure that our soldiers are honest
iand true;
They will fight for peace, not only for
you and me,
But for all other nations across the
blue sea.
I am glad Uncle Sammy has “butted”
in,
Because if he hadn’t the Germans
would win;
And the kaiser, a. man without any
heart,
So what is the difference if relatione
should part?
He eds a good whipping for what he
hsa done,
Ft. f not for him the war would not
have begun;
But now as he started he has to keep
on,
For no peace will we give him until
we have won.,
Hurrah for the allies! They have done
their best
To try and keep thejkaiser out of their
nest;
Russia, France, England, all the rest,
We h you health and strength to
t. stise the pest.
Hello. Pershing! How do you do?
We are all proud of a brave man like
you;
And I know over there across the sea
You are as proud as any general can be.
You know what you are there for and
so do we—
For peace, rights and liberty.
We now wish you, general ,and all our
Sammies,
Health, luck, get wiser and bring br :k
the "kaiser.”
TRENCH AND CAMP
PETE STOPPED SWEARING
Pete was a big-hearted, generous
fellow.
There was but one thing wrong with
Pete—he swore like the proverbial
trooper. Around the mess shack, every
sentence he uttered was lurid with
oaths.
One night Fete went to the Y. M.
C. A. tent for some writing paper and
while standing near the counter, he
engaged in conversation with a com
rade.
Pete began a sentence in a most em
phatic manner, using the name of
Christ as a preface to his utter
ances.
No sconer had the blasphemous
words been uttered than several
voices were heard in protest. One man
said:
“Here, Pete, cut that out. Don’t
you know this is the Y. M. C. A. They
don’t stand for thdt in here.”
Big-hearted, generous Pete turned to
the man at the counter and said: ‘Ex
cuse me, mister, I know that wasn’t
right, but I’ve got the habit. I’ll try
not to do it again.”
And Pete has been a regular attend
ant at the religious and social services
ever since, paying strict attention to
all that is said.
haTCgwryland
Hail, hail to thee, O heritage divine
Land of our fathers, motherland of mine,
Through the dread pains, and travail of
thy birth
Liberty flamed; enlightening all the
earth.
Flamed ’mid the din, of war, baptized
with blood
Cradled and tossed, on freedom’s crimson
flood
Flowing from bodies, sacrificed for thee
My glory land, to set thy children free.
Stand fast ye freemen, for the MIGHT of
RIGHT
Blot out oppression, and all evil smite,
'Hark: to the call, of destiny’s decree
Life’s glorious burden, making mankind
free,
When clangs; to arms; awaken and stand
by
Your souls afire, to conquer or to die,
Shout ye when battling, breathe with
dying breath
Freedom’s defiance. Liberty or death.
Lord, make our nation goodly in Thy
sight
Keep us from famine, pestilence and
blight
May peace and plenty, our dear soil em
brace
Thine ages smile, with tenderness and
grace,
May clouds drop fatness, nature laugh
and sing
And year by year, her golden tribute
bring
In peace and war; make us Thy covenant
host
Thy love, O God, and liberty our boast.
—Gwilym Watkins.
THE FLAG"
Stars of the early dawning, set in a
field of blue,
Stripes of the sunrise splendor, crim
son and white of hue;
Flag of our fathers’ fathers, born on
the field of strife,
Phoenix of fiery battle, risen from hu
man life.
Given for God and freedom—sacred, in
deed, the trust,
Left by the countless thousands re
turned to the silent dust!
Flag of a mighty nation, waving aloft
unfurled,
Kissed by the sun of heaven, caressed
by the winds o’ the world;
Greater than kingly power, greater
than all mankind,
Conceived in the need of the hour, in
spired by the Master Mind.
Over thy living children, over the
laureled grave,
Streaming on high in the cloudless sky,
banner our fathers gave;
Flag of a new-born era, token of every
right
Wrung from a tyrant power, unawed
by a tyrant’s might;
I .ing again a menace outflung from a
foreign shore
\ eeting again the challenge so brave
ly answered of yore;
Under thy spangled folds thy children
await to give
All that they have or are, that the flag
they love shall live.
—Charles G. Crellin.
THE BRAVEIFHOME
The maid who binds her warrior’s
sash,
With smile that well her pains dis
sembles,
The while beneath her drooping lash
Gne starry tear-drop hangs- and trem
bles,
Though heaven alone records the tear,
And fame shall never know her
story,
Her heart has shed a drop as dear |
As e'er bedewed the field of glory.
The wife who girds her husband’s
sword,
Mid little ones who weep or wonder,
And bravely speaks the cheering
word,
What though her heart be rent as
under,.
Doomed nightly in her dreams to hear
The bolts of death around her rattle,
Hath shed as sacred blood as e’er
Was poured upon the field of battle.
The mother who conceals her grief
While to her breast her son she
presses,
Then breathes a few brave words and
briefs,
Kissing the patriot brow she blesses,
With no one but her secret God
To know the pain that weighs upon
her, .
Sheds holy blood as e’er the sod
Received on Freedom’s field of hon
or!
—Thomas Buchanan Read.
■>. »
Trench and Camp
Outfitters
—FOR—
Our Soldier Boys
U. S. A. Regulation Cots,
Steel Cots,
Wood Cots,
All Cotton Cot Pads,
All Silk Floss Pads.
All Feather Pillows,
All Cotton Pillows,
All Sijk Floss Pillows,
Camp Chairs,
Folding Chairs,
Folding Stools,
Folding Steamer Chairs,
Folding Tables,
U. S. A. Army Trunks,
Suit Cases.
Second Floor
BAILIE-EDELBLUT
FURNITURE CO.
708-710-712 Broadway
Phone 1632.
■ ’ a
Have You Written
MOTHER
SOLDIER BOY '
—or have you failed
to send your weekly
“chat” for lack of
Attention Our line
Army Men ° F L Writing Paper
WE SPECIALIZE Novelties,Gifts, Kodaks,
on Films, Flash Lights,
—Army Printed Post Cards and Athletic
Forms Goods (A. G. Spalding)
—Ruling Famous Line
—Binding J s Complete.
—Printing.
DooiSs™., JO WITT'S
Send Us The Handsomest and
YOUR FILMS Largest Stationery Store
______ in the city.
WHEN
SHALL WE
EXPECT A CALL
FROM YOU, SOLDIER BOY ?
You’re Welcome.
JOWTTTS
864 Broad Street. Augusta, Ga.
Bl ■
BALFOUR PRAISES
ARMY Y. M. C. A.
The Rt. Hon. Arthur James Balfour,
secretary of ‘state for foreign affairs, ex
pressed a high opinion of the work being
done by the Young Men’s Christian As
sociation under the red triangle at the
front and also in the prison camps of
Europe. He whites:
"I am sincerely glad to be able to say
that the work of the Y. M. C. A. has been
admirably done, both at home and at the
front; its spiritual andm aterial value to
the men Is beyond all reckoning, and the
services of its personnel are deeply ap
preciated by the soldiers themselves.
Moreover, I know that, largely owing to
the generosity of the United States, our
home-organization has been enabled to
operate on an extended scale in many
parts of the world, and that the activities
of your Y. M. C. A. officials have af
forded untold comfort to our prisoners in
many lands.”
Needful Articles
FOR—-
Sammie Boys
Bedding Rolls,
Clothing Rolls,
Laundry Bags,
Gun Covers,
Pistol Covers,
Post Cards,
Tent Rugs,
Tents Made to Order.
First Floor
T. G. BAILIE
&CO.
708-710-712 Broadway
Phone 1632,
Page 13
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