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Trench and camp. [volume] (Augusta, Ga.) 1917-1919, November 14, 1917, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89053537/1917-11-14/ed-1/seq-12/

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Paris, France.—Said an army officer
just, arrived in France from America:
“It seems almost impossible to arouse
our people to a realization that they are
In a great war. We’ll have to have casu
alty lists first.”
The French people don’t need casualty
lists to remind them. Every, hour of the
day war is impressed on them—whenever
they eat, sleep, talk, travel or seek
amusement.
And what goes for the French also goes
for the thousands of Americans now in
France.
You arrive at a hotel and, naturally,
the clerk tries to induce you to take a
room with a bath, if he has any such lux
ury to offer.
Pretty soon you come down to the of
fice, storming.
“There’s no hot water in that bath,’’
you complain.
He shrugs his shoulders and smiles. You
want to choke him.
"C’est la guerre,” he says. “It is the
war. We are permitted to have hot wa
ter only on Saturdays and Sundays. We
must be economical with our coal, you
know."
“C’est la guerre"—“lt is the war"—is
almost a national motto over here. No
matter what the trouble is, blame it on
the war.
You go into the dining room with a
ravenous appetite, figuring on a nice,
juicy steak with French fried potatoes,
etc. (You know the kind war correspond
ents eat who have liberal expense ac
counts.)
Hut there is no meat.
The waiter is grieved because you've
forgotten it is Monday.
“It is prohibited to eat meat on Mon
days and Tuesdays, monsieur." he says.
You soon find that Tuesday is the black
day for eating.
On Tuesdays you can neither eat ment
r.or pastry. Pastry is alto forbidden on
Wednesdays.
About 49 per cent, of the people in Paris
ent their meals in restaurants, and these
restrictions on meats and pastries have
resulted in enormous savings of food sup
plies.
If your room at the hotel is dark, you
try to turn on the electric lights soon
after supper. But there’s no light.
The very minute each evening when
“the lights come on" is fixed by law. Con
servation of coal again.
If you burn kerosene in lamps or gas
in your cook stove your consumption is:
limited to G 5 per cent, of what it was be
fore the war.
Only the rich can afford to run autos
any more, because gasoline in France
now retails at 51.29 agallon. It makes
one smile to recall the storms of protest
in America about a year ago when the
MESS SERGEANTS,
ATTENTION !
w—in— m——■ m ——Mil ■ mmmwii— mmn ru—wn—nuimMr- i in
FOR FISH AND OYSTERS
CALL ON THE
BIG WHOLESALE HOUSE
FRESH ARRIVALS DAILY
NORFOLK OYSTERS.
PHONE OR CALL
AUGUSTA FISH CO.
1115 Fenwick Street. Phone 2666.
Page 12
GASOLINE COSTS
. $1.29 IN FRANCE
SOLDIERS!
YOU APPRECIATE GOOD FOOD,
PROPERLY PREPARED, DON’T YOU ?
AND THE BEST PART OF IT IS—
It Is Reasonably Priced!
You Serve Yourself Direct From Our Sanitary Steam
Tables^—We Put the Money That We Would Ordinarily
Pay to Waiters into QUALITY, and You Are Doubly
Benefitted.
Accommodation For Two Hundred.
NO CROWDING. NO WAITING.
LIPOT’S CAFETERIA
851 BROAD STREET. AUGUSTA, GA.
TRENCH AND CAMP
price of the juice got up to about 25 cents
a gallon.
You go to the theater, and after the
performance you wonder why everybody
rushes away peli-meil for the subway
entrances.
You follow leisurely, only to discover
when you arrive at the subway, that “the
last car is gone/’ And there are no “owl”
cars for late stayers.
“On account of the war, service is pro
hibited after 11 o'clock.” says the signs.
If you’ve missed the last car, the
chances are you’ll either walk home or
stay in a downtown hotel, for taxis in
Paris after 9 o’clock are few and far
between.
The government allows a taxi driver
only so much gasoline every day, so he
can run his car only so far. and he’s
usually run down by dinner time in the
evening.
You decide to call a friend over the
long distance in another city.
"Come to the office and identify your
self," you are told by the operator, and
you have to go many blocks to a tele
phone substation and then you are told
you cannot talk if your party lives more
than sixty-five miles away.
Restrictions also govern the sending of
telegrams. Always your identification pa
pers must be produced and then dis
patches can only be sent in French for
France, in Italian for Italy, in English
for England and the United States. For
all nueral countries, French only.
All shops must be closed at 6:30 in the
evening, the idea being to economize on
light.
You can’t buy a gun or pistol under any
circumstances during the period of war.
Every line in every newspaper has been
censored by the government before pub
lication, and the big blank spaces that so
often appear are sure signs that some
thing was cut out that might have given
“information or comfort” to the enemy.
And as to photography—you almost take
••ou I fe in your hands to appear in pub
lic with a camera.
"C’est la guerre,” the policeman apolo
g’zes who nabs you and tells you to get
rid of your picturetaker.
Otherwise. France is a very fine coun
try.
REVIVAL SERVTcES AT"TENT.
Since the tent of the Georgia Baptist
Mission Board was moved from the en
trance to caxnp and was pitched just
outside the camp, near the 112th In
fantry, the meetings have taken on
new interest. Under the direction of
Rev. T. F. Callaway, the services have
been of an evangelistic character and
the attendance has been most necour
aging. Many soldiers have declared
I heir intention of breaking with sin.
PHILLY TOO MUCH
FOR SCRANTON BOYS
A visitor to Camp Hancock on Tuesday,
November 6th, might have been halted in
his wanderings by a vigorous game of
baseball as he passed Y. M. C. A. Build
ing No. 79. If his interest had been
aroused to the point of curiosity he might
have discovered one of the twists of fate
which has occurred in the army.
During the recent reorganization, Co.
B, of the 13th, became a part of Co. B, of
the 109th. Co. B, of the 13th, had boasted
of their prowess at America’s national
game. They had provided their men with
nice new uniforms and had successfully
turned back most of their opponents.
Great as was tiie power of the team from
Scranton, greater was that of the Phila
delphia boys. They had never been de
feated. This then, casual visitor, was the
story back of this titanic combat.
The game itself started in the most fav
orable fashion for the boys from the 13th.
The fourth inning found them leading by
the score of 4 to 0. The fighting spirit
of the Philadelphia outfit was fully
aroused. They started to work the op
posing pitcher. Gavanes, to the limit. It
seemed to shake his confidence as a com-
Pennsylvania
Home Restaurant
Ninth and Walker Streets, one Block from Post
Office. Near Union Station.
‘ <TH£ PLAC£ TO MEET HOMEFOLKS.”
Special Dinner
Cream of Celery Soup
50c Roast Chicken with 50c
Dressing
Roast Tenderloin of Beef
Mashed Potatoes Green Peas
Stewed Tomatoes
' Corn Muffins
Waldorf Salad
50c Tapioca Pudding
' Coffee Tea Milk
Special Turkey Dinner 75c
“Come in and get a Real Pennsylvania
Welcome.”
SO JU £> 1 ERS '
W© Are Ready to Help You Fight the Cold.
Note the following new arrivals:
Sheep-lined Coats in all sizes $12.50 to $20.00
Overcoats, sizes 34 to 48 532.50 to $50.00
French Coats, sizes 34 to 48 527.50 to $40.00
Heavy weight Uniforms and Army Regulation
Sweaters.
MILITARY OUTFITTERS.
Nov. 14, 1917.
bination of three bases on balls and two
hits with good base running, scored four
runs and the game was tied.
The 13th men braced themselves and
scored two more of their men against one
Os their opponents. Thus stood the score
at the opening of the ninth. The 13th
boys went out in order. They were confi
dent now. But the 109th boys were not
to be denied, as the strain was telling on
Ga.vanes. of “Gussie,” as his teammates
called him. A mixture of base on balls
and a hit scored-a run. and the game hung
in the balance. The bases were “loaded”
and Smith, the pitcher was at the bat.
Gavanes seemed to lose control.
One ball! Up to the plate came the
next ball. Smith twisted and turned, but
the incoming ball flew straight for his
ribs. Smith trotted to first, holding a
certain portion of his anatomy. A big,
big run drifted over the plate and the
109th boys were still undefeated.
Some esteemed speakers barred from'
army camps are of the opinion that the
safeguarding of the soldiers* morals can
be carried to extremes.
The only race contest this country wants
is to see how quickly rt can get the boys
over there.

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