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Trench and camp. [volume] (Augusta, Ga.) 1917-1919, December 05, 1917, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89053537/1917-12-05/ed-1/seq-12/

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Communion Service to be Held
in Underground Hospital
Holy Communion was administered
to eighty-six soldiers on Sunday at
Y. M. C. A. Buildings 75, 77 and 79,
Chaplains McFetri'dge ami Houghton,
and Rev. N. B. Groton, volunteer civil
ian chaplain of the Episcopal church
being th ecelebrants.
The camp will have on of its most
unique experiences Sunday next when
a service of the Holy Communion will
be held in the underground Field Hos
pital at Ba. m. The surroundings will J
be suggestive of the great spiritual
communion with those brothers in
similar quarters “Over there,” but who
are wounded and passing on.
A similar service of the Holy Com
munion will be held in Y. M. C. A
Building No. 77 (Engineers), at 8 a. in.
as notv regularly established for every
Sunday. All baptized men are invited
to receive.
Scores < f boys from the camp, but
mostly from the cavalry, enjoyed the!
hospitality of the rector and ladies
of the Church of the Good Shepherd
Wednesday last. The close of the
evening came all too soon.
A similar event took place at St.l
Paul’s Church with “open house” in
the new Parish Building- Thanksgiv
ing Day. Also, as usual, in the hour
preceding service Sunday evening.
A directory of members of the Epis
copal church is being compiled by Mr.
Meehan, Brotherhood Camp Secretary
Give him assistance in this good work
by sending names to his quarters, Y.
■ M. C. 4. Building No. 77. Christmas
"doings” in prospect will make this in
valuable.
Pleasant places for the boys to drop
in to meet and make friends are St.
Paul’s Church, Sunday evening, 6:30,
and at the Church of the Good Shep
herd every Wednesday at 8 p. in. Find
a cup of something steaming hot, and
toothsome etcetaris, to say nothing of
the plaesant company.
SCHOOL BOY’S PATRIOTISM
Here is a characteristic letter from a
boy in Johnstown. Pa., and we give it
with the original spelling:
Johnstown, Pa., Nov. 26, 1917.
Y. M. C. A. Hut,
Camp Hancoks.
Dear Sir:
The Hudson Street school of Johns
town • wishes for the secretary of the
Y M. C. A. to distribute the Johnstown
school news to the Johnstown soldiers
or other soldiers who would like to
have one. We want to show the Johns
town boys that not ever body in this
cruel world have forgot them. We
hope you will like them as there are
sorpe very interesting copies in it.
When ever you go to France shoot
strait, And make the world safe for •
Democracy. Think what Gen. Jack
son said to his troops, “ Stand to your
guns! See that every shot tells!" and
then the Germans will flee like sheep.
We will try. to keep the home fires
burning till the boys come home.
Yours truly,
KARL HARRIS.
There may be a few mistakes in the
spelling, but the spirit of Karl Harris
is the spirit that saved the Union —and
the gratifying thing is that this boy’s
letter is but the visible expression of
the dominating thoughts in the minds
of millions of boys of the United
States.
KILLED TEN GERMANS.
The Victoria Cross has been awarded
Corporal Filip Konowal, a Russian who
enlisted with the Canadian forces at Ot
tawa.
Single-handed, he killed ten Germans
in a cellar.
Later he captured a machine gun which
was holding up an advance, killing the
crew and bringing the gun back to his
own lines. , ,
Next day, he attacked another machine
gun position unaided, killed three of the
crew and destroyed the gun with ex-\
plosives.
CAMP SECRETARY COMES HERE.
H. L. Simmons, who has been appoint
ed to Building No. 78 as building secre
tary, was for several months camp sec
retary at Camp Swep Taylor, Jackson, (
Miss. This Camp Taylor was aban- ,
doned recently and the entire force of;
secretaries transferred to other camps,
Mr. Simmons being the only man to I
come to Camp Hancock. All the sol- ,
diers at Camp Taylor—about 6,ooowere j
sent to Camp Beauregard, at Alexandria, I
La. Mr. Simmons was secretary of the i
Mississippi A. and M. before entering the
army • service and while at Camp Tay- I
lor assisted materially in raising the |
state’s quota of the War Work fund.
BAZAAR AND LUNCHEON.
The ladles of St. Paul's Episcopal
church, corner Sixth street and the Sa
vannah river, will hold their annual ba- i
zaar today and tomorrow and invite the !
soldiers of Camp Hancock to patronize i
the luncheon, which will be served from I
1 o’clock on. Turkey will be the chief
attraction on the menu and the ladies ‘
have made a great reputation for them- !
selves in the culinary art.
GIRARD COLLEGE SERVICE FLAG. I
Girard College was presented with a I
many-starred service flag at the annual I
Thanksgiving exercises. It is 12x22 feet
and was hung between the two central
pillars of the main entrance. It is es
timated that 235 graduates of the school
are in the service of their country.
LENWOOD HOTEL OPENED.
On Saturday night, the new Lenwood
hotel, named affter General Leonard
Wood, which occupies a commanding po
sition near the entrance to Camp Han
cock, was formally opened. It is an im
posing brick and stone structure and
will accommodate 200 guests. The cost
of the hotel was about $400,000, and is
designed primarily for the accommoda
tion of winter tourists.
Page 12
FRENCH AND CAM*
2,000 Second Lieutenants
Regimental assignments of mare than
2,000 provisional second lieutenants of the
regular army, appointed from the offi
cers reserve corps, graduates of the of
ficers' draining camps, or the ranks of
the army, were published by the war de
partment. Some go to the afmy serviee
schools or the coast artillery training
camps.
BOLYARD’S
BARBER
SHOP
221 Bth St.
A modern shop
with 12 experi
enced Barbers
and efficient ser
vice.
Located on Jack
son street, below
Genesta Hotel.
No advance in
prices.
Open until 9 ev
ery evening and
until 11:30 on
Saturdays.
Expert Manicur
ing.
You would en
joy being worked
on here.
The Augusta
Herald
Delivered to Your
Company Street
At Camp Hancock.
Afternoons and
Sundays,
60c a Month.
Phone Your Order
to 2036 Augusta.
Notify Herald
Wagons.
Write a Post Card
and say, Send Me
The Augusta Herald
Daily Sunday
Evening Morning
DRINK
At Counters
Camp Hancock Boys!
|| Imi UMB IIIMIMH —IIM ■■■! ■l—
have Souvenirs and Novelties to suit your taste.
Our line consists of:
Felt and Silk Pennants, Pillow Tops, Post Cards,
Picture?, Swagger Sticks, Tie and Handkerchief
Holders.

Our stock also includes some camp necessities, such as:
Comfort Kits, Hat Cords, Khaki and Silk Handker
chiefs, Collar Ornaments, Money Belts, and many other
useful articles.
Camp Hancock Souvenir Store
630 BROAD STREET.
Our Motto: Popular Prices, Courteous Service.
You Can Make Your Tent More Comfortable
If You Cover The Floor With
Slusky’s Rubber Roofing
It will add warmth to the tent, keep out the dampness,
cold winds and insects. It will be more than a carpet to
your floor. The cost is small—the comfort great. $1.25
per roll of 108 square feet, including nails for applying,
delivered at the camp. Call Phone 100 and we will de
liver it to you.
David Slusky & Son
1009 BROAD STREET. AUGUSTA.
Camp Hancock Soldiers
ATTENTION!!
We beg to announce that we are prepared to take
care of your wants in anything electrical. We are es
pecially featuring, for your approval, the following
things:
TELEPHONE, TELEGRAPH INSTRUMENTS, FLASH
LIGHTS, BATTERIES AND MANY OTHER
• ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES.
We are an independent iirni, sell closer than many
otner places of the same kind, and can therefore offer
you much better prices.
NEW HOME ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING
COMPANY
857 Ml Bread. St. Augusta, Ga. Phone 1000.
Dec. 5, 1917.

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