OCR Interpretation


The copper era. (Clifton, Graham County, Ariz.) 1899-1911, April 26, 1900, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89053851/1900-04-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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Secretary Charles II Akers
THE COPPER IM.
Issued Thursdays. CLIFTON, ARIZONA, APRIL 26, 1900. Vol, 2, No. 2
A- G. SMITH, Cashier.
C. F. SOLOMON, Asst. Cashier.
D. W. WICKERS HAM, Pres.
I. E. SOLOMON, Vice-Pres.
SUIJIJLSLSLSLSLSISLSUULSISLSLSLSL
The Gila Valley Bank,
YYygTTiriroTrriroTnnrg
Solomonville, Arizona.
PPP OTnRS D W" Wlckersham, A. G. Smith, I. E. Solomon, C. K.
- ' . 1 WrVO. gnomon, JJ b. Adams, Geo. A. Olney, Adolph Solomon.
Capital Stock, Paid up, - -
$25,000.
i)jm This Bank solicits accounts, offering to depositors liberal treatment
Vg? and every facility consistent with sound banking.
A NEW SYSTEM'S FAILURE.
. He owned a little paper.
And business was bad.
He was losing his subscribers.
And couldn't get an "ad."
So he made a bold announcement,
Saying "Here, is something new!
Hereafter we will edit
' , As George Washington would do
Every column
Will be solemn
Trfcth, from an unbiased view,"
And In his next week's issue
He told the simple facts.
(Some of them as cutting
As if told by an ax.)
He wrote of social doings
In unembellshed style.
And public men he mentioned.
Also their stock of guile.
Very truthful, .
Was this youthful
Editor with winning smile.
That was the only issue
On the Washingtonian plan.
Also the final labor
Of the honest minded man.
His paper is not running,
Since it started such a buzz;
But the editor is running
Or, when last observed, he was
"He was chasing.
He was racing
Just as Aguinaldo does.
Josh Wink in Baltimore American.
Mexico stands third on the list
of countries that export coffee
to the United States, 984,813
sacks of the coffee bean coming'
here in 1899.
There is a growing- demand in
the United States for Mexican
goat skins for making gloves.
The skins are mostly exported
to New York.
Mount Union near Prescott, is
3,000 feet high; San Francisco
mountain is 12,561 feet high; the
altitude of Prescott is 5,318 feet
above sea level; Phoenix 1,800,
Tucson, 2,390.
A big movement of Mexican
cattle into the United States
will begin this week. The Si
erra Madre railroad lias been
called on to supply $00 stock
cars for cattle to be loaded at
Uablan and Terrazas stations on
ít S'orra Madre Line.
'". u r. there is a conflict of
i ' ":: as to which one of two
I .-: t is the one set by the
iotaivr of a mining claim to
mart - ie of the corners, one of
wLit h would exclude and one
in i ud ; the discovery on which
the location was based, and the
work done by the locators, and
the official survey for a patent
was based on the latter on in
formation given by the locator
who set the posts, the testi
mony in favor of that as the
true corner which sustains a
survey and the validity of the
location will be preferred.
Credo Mining and Smelting Co.
vs. Highland Mining and Mill
ing Co., 95 Fed. Rep. (U. S.) 91.
Every British reader should
know the origin of the sobriquet
"Tommy Atkins." Tommy At
kins was the name of a sentry
who, when the Europeans in
Lucknow were flying- for the
Residency, from- the mutineers,
refused to leave his post, and
so perished . After that it be
came the fashion to speak of a
conspicuously heroic soldier in
the fights with the rebels as "a
regular Tommy Atkins." Lon
don Daily News. -
A press dispatch states that
the present position of the south
magnetic pole has been located.
The location of the magnetic
pole, which is, of course, the
spot at which the needle dips to
90 degrees, does not in any sense
imply contiguity to the geo
graphical pole, but it is inter
esting to remember that where
as Sir James Ross it 1842 only
succeeded in reaching a point
where the needle dipped high,
Borchgrevink has, during his
Antartic summer, touched the
precise location of the magnet
ic pole.
At Orange, New Jersey, Sat
urray last, a remarkable experi
ment was made at the labora
tory of Thomas A. Edison, when
a piece of iron was melted in
five seconds. Louis Dreyfus, of
Erankfort-on-the-Main, who is
the agent of Goldschmidt's
Chemische-Themo Industrie, of
Ees sen, Germany, showed Mr.
Edison this new process for at
taining heat in an almost in
credibly short time by the com
bustion of a certain chemical
compound, which the inventor
keeps a secret, used in connec
tion with powdered aluminum.
Mr. Dreyfus placed half a cup
ful of the chemical in a crucible,
covered it with a small quantity
of powdered aluminum, and then
placed a wrench about half an
inch thick and 6 long in the
crucible. Touching a match to
the compound, Mr. Dreyfus
stepped back, and the mixtune
blazed up furiously. In five
seconds the wrench was all melt
ed. It is estimated that the
heat evolved in the process was
3,000 degrees centigrade, hither
to considered impossible to
reach. The value of the process
is expected to be shown in weld
ing together steel rails.
The secretary of the interior
may permit, under regulations
to be prescribed by him, the use
of timber and stone found upon
such reservations, free of charge
by bona fide settlers, miners, I
residents and prospectors, for
minerals, for firewood, fencing,
building, mining, prospecting
and other domestic purposes,
as may be needed by such per
sons for such purposes; such
timber to be used within the
state or territory, respectively,
where such reservations may be
located. This provision is lim
ited to persons residenf in for
est reservations who have not a
sufficient supply of timber or
stone for their own claims or
lands for the purposes, enumer
ated, or for necessary use in de
veloping the mineral or other
natural resourses of the lands
owned or occupied by them.
Such persons, therefore, are
permitted to take timber and
stone from public lands in the
forest reservation under the
terms of the above quoted,
strictly for their individual use
on their own claims or lands
owned or occupied by them,
but not for sale or disposal or
use on other lands, or by other
persons; provided, that where
the stumpage exceeds one hun
dred dollars, application must
be made to and permission given
by the department. It appears
that the forest officials who have
been preventing the people liv
ing on the reservations from
getting fire wood did so without
authority. ,
Posts from five to seven inches
in diameter, firmly planted in
the ground at the corners and
ends of a mining claim, and
standing not less than five :eet
above ground are "permarent
monuments," within the mean
ing of Rev. St. 2324, requh ing
all records of such claims to
contain such a description, of
the claim by reference to some
natural object or permanent
monument as will identify the
claim, and a recorded notice,
which, in -addition to a reference
to such posts, also gives the gen
eral direction and distance of
the claim from a lake and a
river, is a sufficient compliance
with the statute. Credo Mining
and Smelting Co., 95 Fed. Rep.
(U. S.) 911.

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