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The Parma herald. (Parma, Idaho) 1903-1917, October 11, 1917, Image 1

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THE PARMA HERALD
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PARMA, CANYON COUNTY. IDAHO. THURSDAY, OCTOBER ,11 1917
Vol. XV No 1, Finis
' SUBSCRIPTION: 41.50 Yean
GUNS AND
AMMUNITION
I
i AR R Ö1
Have you tried the new Rem
ington UMC "Arrow" and "Ni
tro Club" Shotshells?
These are the first completely wetproof
shotshells made. They work perfectly under
all conditions in any kind of weather, and can
be depended on for sure fire, speed, pattern
and penetration, wet days as
well as dry.
ii
t
j!
Look at our Stock of Guns
W. E. FISK
%
!
Ç THE GOOD
JUDQE VISITS ARFiy HEADQUARTERS^
i
FINE.GENERAL.BUT you KNOW THE toys IN THE
RANKS ARE WANTING WB CUT-THAT REAL
TOBACCO CHEW.
f
i«5)
COLONEL.HOW
IS YOUR REQIN
TO-DAY»
t
[ GOOD TOBACCO IS
'—.THE SOLDIER'S
—COMFORTER.
\
T
D
'P
YV'HEN you trim your outfit down to military
* ' bedrock, W-B Cut Chewing scores a bull's
eye. A soldier gets more from his pouch of W-B
than from a bulky ordinary plug—rich leaf plump
full of sap, all tobacco satisfaction, every shred
of it. And the water-proof pouch keeps it clean
and fresh in the pocket of his khaki.
Made by WEYMAN-BRUTON COMPANY, 1107 Broadway, Naw York City
For
Friday and
Saturd ay
!
I
I
I
1
:
.
Picnic Hams, 28 cents
i
The cheapest meat you can buy.
1
Sunbrite Cleanser, 4c. per can
»
EGGS, 421-2 cents
BUTTER, 45 . cents
for
We
pay you more
your produce
Yours For Service,
J. Carl Baldridge
*
/
PROFESSIONAL CARDS,
CANYON ABSTRACT AND
TRUST CO,, LTD.
CAPITA!., »25,000
Office in Bank Bldg.
Caldwell, Idaho)
Phone 11
. » -L * M+'rr
W. K, Waldrop, M. D,
Office and H«e*i*lence un 4th St.
Parma, Lialio
Phone 51~2s
W. A. 'Stone
ATTORNEY-AT-LAVV
Caldwell, Idaho
W ill practise in all the courts.
Alfred F. Stone
ATTORNEY-AT- LA W
Will practise i" all the courts
Caldwell, Idaho
Frank Martin
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Office Idaho Bldg., Boise, Idaho
Phone 554
Get your Butter Wraps at the
Herald Print Shop.
!
Walter Griffiths |
Griffiths & Griffiths i
ATTORNEYS AT-LAW
Caldwell, Idaho
H. A Griffiths
Dr. D. S. Numbers
Office Easter Bldg
I
;
!
I
Physician and Surgeon.
Successor to Dr. R. J. Cluen.
Phone No. 18
Dr. Humphreys,
Dentist
Office? : Rooms 1 <k 2, Kerrick Bldg.
Ptaonp 48 ;
Parma. Idaho
Leon Rubins, B, A., D. D. S.
DENTIST
Parlors over Parma State Bank
Phone 05
ARENA
VAUUËV
(By "Arena")
XOTKS.
Mr. Prana was a business visitor
is Parma, Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. Mundle and Alice
wore in the valley Sunday.
Charley Ford's team became
frightened and ran away with the
mowing machine a few days ago. The
machine was broken, but neither man
nor team was injured.
Frank Shepard lost a calf from
bloat a few days ago.
Arthur Burton has finished the
concrete drops on the Clark latteral.
Mrs. Z. B. Barker is Improving,
but was not able to accompany her
mother when she returned to her
home in Meridian last Sunday as she
had planned.
Sunday school every Sunday after
noon. Everyone is invited to at
tend.
Mr. and Mrs. Cope w;ere dinner
guests of Butlers, Monday.
Burket Bray and wife of Fargo
were guests at the Cope home the
first of the week.
J. P. Butler, T. J. Cope, John Bau
man and Ben Sundblad were Parma
visitors Monday. That looked like
the boys had gotten up their third
crop of hay.
Letters received from Fritz Lund,
who joined the marines in Portland
last January, states that he is in
good health and happy. Pictures of
himself sent his mother and sister
bears him out in his statement. He
is at Guam.
Theodore Johnson has bought an
80-acre farm near Wilder.
Now is the time to list your property.
We have the cash buyers.
Hudson & Elerick, Wilder, Idaho.
Dr. F. Zeiger
Veterinarian
Calls an A we red day or niuht.
Reference—my patrons. Chargea
reasonable. Phone 40. Parma, Ida.
Business Locals
Optometry means eye service.
Sinçlp t cens at Fisk Hardware
Company.
F. E. Fisk pars liiahsst mark
et price for hogs. See nun before
selling:.
Seven per rent and 8 per cent money
to loan on good farm security. We try
to make chattel loons. A. 1. Myers,
Caldwell, Idaho
H Scott is in the market for o I
iron, rubber, ,-fc. This stuff is neede I
for wa£purpoges. Clean up your scrap
heap, get something out of it, and he p
your country. See Scott —a,iv
tf
!3tf
IDAHO TO BUY
i 10,000,000
ASIDE FROM STATUS AJ GOOD
INVESTMENT, SECOND BOND
ISSUE SHOULP RR BOUGHT
AS SUPPORT TQ SOLDIER.?,
Boise, Oct. 100.—Idaho must ip
vest $7,900,000 in
The executive committee of
Liberty Bonds,
. .
as the minimum for the state. The
maximum is $13,000,000. In order
to have the state keep up its record
for supplying funds for war pur
poses and to come up jo the expec
tatlons of the executive committee
of the twelfth district, Idahe must
buy bonds to the amount of $10,
000,000.
The government; must have $3,
000,000,000, and to ge.t this mini
mum amount Idaho must subscribe
$7,900,000, but this figure should
by no means be the maximum, Chair
man Davis says that $9,000,000 must
be taken as the state's minimum and
that the full $10,000,000 that thq
western division headquarters ex
pects should be subscribed.
The government cannot get along
with less than $3,000,000,000 and it
is asking subscriptions up to $5,000,
000. In order to meet the demands
of the government it is imperative
that Idaho buys bonds up to the full
$10,000,000 allotment.
"Some people have the idea that
to buy a liberty bond is to make a
donation to the government," said
former Governor James H. Hawley.
"If the government were taking our
dollars in the shape of taxes no
loyal citizen would have a right to
complain. We are, however, offered
a government bond that pays 4 per
cent interest. Holdings up to $5,000
are exempt from all taxes. All hold
ings, no matter if one has o million
dollars worth, are exempt from local
taxes and also from the normal in
come tax. Can you find a better and
a safer investment for the man with
money. The man who refuses to
buy a liberty bond, if he has the
money to buy it with, Is not a good
citizen. The question of invest
ment should be a secondary consid
eration. The all important thing is
that pur boys, the sons of mothers
and fathers of Idaho, have gone to
the front. Their welfare demands
that 1 our dollars be handed over to
the government. The red-blooded
loyal American will give unstinted,
financial support, whether it is for
Red Cross work, for Liberty Bonds,
or for one' of the other funds needed
for the welfare of the enlisted men."
twelfth district has fixed thi3 figure
THE WISH AND THE DEED.
A dry goods merchant was start
ing down town when his wife re
minded him of his most Important
duty during the day: "Now, my
dear, be sure and send to the city
for that new buggy, so we can ha' e
it for Sunday. You know our old
rig is getting so that it isn't fit to to
be seen."
Just a few blocks away the ve
hicle and implement dealer was sit
ting at family.
The conversation drifted around
the near approach of school. "And
that reminds me, John," said the
lady who sat at the head of the ta
bie,"I must be going to the city not
later than next week. I must get
school clothes and see about a fall
suit for myself, and while I'm there,
perhaps I had better see about a new
rug for the parlor and some lace
curtains for the front windows.
'SrbaLu 'î^bSï
which he was going to send to a cat-I
alogue house for a new bedroom
suite. .
"How's business. asked ^ the
banker. "Oh, not so very good, re
plied the^ grocer. ''Things are dull
just now." .
Before the banker finished writ
ing out the draft a dapper young
man with a smile stepped up and
asked how everything was. The
banker seemed glad to see him. He
vas a representative of a big print
ing establishment fri another state.
He chatted pleasantly with the.
banker for a few minutes, after
which the young man casually of hisj
friend behind the window if
Well, yes," re
dm
wanted anything. ■
nlied the banker, " I believe I do.
checks and a couple
Print us 5000
of thousand letterheads." The young
thanked his friend and hustied
man
out.
That night the business men of the
to discuss the
evil.
town had a meeting
growth of the mail order
make plans for bringing greater
prosperity to the home town. The
dry goods merchant, the vehicle and
implement dealer, the grocer and the
banker all made short talks. They
agreed that the ranchers, and the
town folks who persisted in buying
goods from mail order and outside
houses were guilty of treason to the
home town, that they were the peo
ple who killed prosperity.
But these men stopped short of all
the facts. Did you ever see a town
making a real success of itself where
the business men were not working
together? Did you ever see a suc
cessful town without a successful lo
cal printing shop? Did you ever see
such a print shop successful without
the support of the home banker, the
home merchant, the home grocer,
and all the home dealers? The print
ing of letterheads, envelopes, state
ments, circulars and cards is the life
of business for the local print shop.
it's job
if you
to
J !
■K
j
>
•v
But it doesn't matter if
printing or bedroom Suites,
send the business away, give it to
outside cities, you deprive the local
business of the support that makes
the town's prosperity.
The home town must hold the
busmess of the ranchers, it needs the
business of its citizens, and it needs
the business of its business men also.
But none of the ranchers, citizens,
bankers, printers or merchants can
argue business into a town; it must
be demonstrated.
Ever hear of Chicago or New York
City sending their orders out of
town? Reckon not.
BUTTER WRAPPERS
[START CHURCH|
B UILDING F UND
CONGREGATIONAL MEETING
INSTRUCTS TRUSTEES TO TO,
TAL PLEDGES—FAVOR PLAN
PROVIDING FOR FUTURE.
Of the two planst submitted for a
new church at the congregational
! meeting of the. First Presbyterian
I church, Friday evening, those for the
[ larger and more expensive church
, were judged to be more suited to the
j present and future needs of the com
munity and were favored. About 75
persops were present, q fine attend
ance for the fruit harvesting season
of the year when everyone is work
jng overtime. Among those discuss
ing the subject of the new church
both as to plans and building fund,
were J. Vf. Price, G. M. Kirkpatrick,
J. C. Blackwell, Rev. Paul W. Gauss,
H. Ç. Baldridge and F. J. Walmsley.
Mr. Blackwell, as chairman of the
board of trustees, received instruc
tiens from the congregation to pro
eeed with pledges and ascertain how
much money can be raised for a new
church. Following the business ses
slor„ light refreshments were served
and a social hour enjoyed,
;
THE RED CROSS
HARVEST HOME SOCIAL
The Red Cross Harvest Home So
cial that has been arranged for Fri
day evening, Oct. 12, is attracting
wide attention and everyone in the
community is planning to attend.
The Harvest Home auction will be
held at 8:30 p. m. and will be im
mediately followed by a White Ele
phant Auction Sale. Useful articles
are requested for each of these sales
and they will give you an opportuni
ty to purchase some long-sought ar
ticle for yourself.
Come to have a good time and help
a good cause.
GOES TO NEBRASKA FOR BRIDE
Max Schmid returned Saturday
from Chappell, Neb., where on Wed
nesday of last week he was united
in marriage to Miss Ostermeyer, of
that place. The parents of the new
ly wedded couple returned with them
and are looking over this section
with a view to locating..
THRIFT VERSUS WASTE.
These are days for real thrift and
economy. We need both to win the
war. Economy does not mean sting
iness, or hiding your money away—
but it does mean your best judgment
in buying.
It is never economical to buy poor
goods; they cost more in the long
run.
GOOD goods have value that will
give you service and satisfaction.
Let it be SHOES. HOSIERY, UN
DERWEAR, or wearing apparel of
any kind, it is goods of this charac
ter that you will find at
THE GEM.
RED CROSS BENEFIT.
The Red Cross Benefit will be held
l Friday night as per schedule. The
Harvest Home auction will be held
at 8:30 p. m. and the White Ele
phant auction immediately following,
__
„ , T r j
LOIUmiitCC V\ OFKS riaru.
——-—
Boise, Oct. 8.—There is no such
'thing as an 8-hour dav at the state
I
committee. D. W. Davis, chairman
of the state committee; Colonel E.
>1. Hoover, secretary; H. S. Boone,
ji rec t representative of Secretary
ifcAdoo; Reilly Atkinson, in charge
r the public speaking and publicity,
, r.d all others, have forgotten their
ivate business and at the end of
-.he campaign will be strangers
! their own homes,
( When Chairman Davis came to
3 0 j se from American Falls, he shed
y ls coar anc j has not had time to
-^t it on. "We must have an or
ranizaticn." said he. "It must
reach every corner of Idaho. When
.are thoroughly organized, then
in
>ve shali strike and the people of
fdaho will know that the call for
finances is not to be treated lightly;
it that it is the most serious prop
itiou that has to be met in connec
: :un with the big war. We must not
• uy finance the United States so
that our own brave men men will
bave every care and the best equip
ment, but we must also see to it that
he heroic soldiers of our allies are
ept in food, clothing and ammuni
tion. If we could just get hold of
every man and woman in Idaho who
has money enough to buy a liberty
bond and make them feel and see
their patriotic duty, we could get
four times the money the govern
ment is asking of us.
"The crops of Idaho this year are
.vorth millions. The livestock and
the output of the mines have added
many millions to our wealth, all of
which makes it possible to buy bonds
in the amount demanded by the fed
eral government."
PLANS COMPLETED.
R. E. Field,architect, has just com
pleted the plans for the addition of
the second story to Wilder's new
grade and high school building. This
district voted for a ten thousand dol
lar bond issue last spring, and the
contract was let for
one-story
grade school building. The need for
a high school was later generally rec
ognized and an additional $750 bond
issue was voted. The plans for the
new building provide for a full base
ment with steam heating plant, two
car fuel room, toilets, manual train
ing and domestic science rooms, and
large community room. On the first
floor are four grade rooms, and on
the second floor there is a large as
sembly and study hall and three am
ple recitation rooms with a science
and physical laboratory with a small
teacher's laboratory and store room,
and a dark room adjoining. An of
fice and library are provided on an
intermediate floor over the entrance.
The entire exterior of the building is
faced with McGee's Caldwell Cement
brick.—Caldwell Tribune.
APPROVE 39,000
ACRE DISTRICT
BLACK ÇANYON SETTLERf,
VOTE UNANIMOUSLY IN FAV.
OR OF RECLAIMING SECTION
OF PROJECT—211 VOTES CAST
special election held last Sat
urday, Black Canyon settlers signi
fied their approval of the plan of en
tering into a contract with the gov
ernment for the watering of 39,00(1
acres of the Black Canyon project
in the immediate future. The vote
was unanimously jn favqr pf the pro
ject and 211 votes were cast. Front
Parma 35 voters were taken to the
Notus polls ip cars furnished by the.
Parma Compiercjal Club.
The Black Capyon directors will
immediately proceed with negotia
tions with the government.
At q
I. O O. F. DELEGATES WILL
ATTEND grand lodge
The gaiu( lodge, grand encamp
ment and Robekah state assembly of
the Independent Order of Odd Fel
lpwg will convene in annual session
at Nampa next week. The grand en
campment and Rebekah assembly
will meet Monday morning at 10:00
o'clock, and the grand Igdge Tuesday
afternoon at 1:30. Adjournment will
be had Thursday.
Quite a delegation of Parma Odd
Fellows and Rebekahs will be in at
tendance. Officers and delegates who
will attend are : Mrs- C- B. Ross,
president, Mrs, M. A. Bates, inside
guardian ,and Mrs. Nellie Watkins,
Misa Elise Boehringer and Mrs. Nel
lie Baldridge, delegates of the Re
bekah assembly; C. B. Ross, grand
senior warden, and S. G. Tucker and
M. A- Bates, delegates of the grand
encampment; J. Ç. Baldridge and
W. B. Mitchell, delegates to the
grand lodge. Several other members
of the different branches, probably
20 in all, will attend.
Nampa is making great prepara
tion for the entertainment of the
1,009 members of the order that will
visit that progressive city during the
week.
PARMA HAPPENINGS
Now is the time to list your property.
We have the cash buyers
Hudson & Elerick, Wilder, Idaho.
Dr. Boone, president of the Col
lege of Idaho, will preach at the
First Presbyterian church next Sun
day, Oct. 14, morning and evening.
The high school was dismissed for
a couple of weeks Monday to allow
the pupils to help in harvesting the
fruit crop.
The other day Mrs. Ö. G. Boyd re
ceived a letter from her son, Elwyn,
who is with the boys at Camp
Greene. The boys were considerably
disappointed at the dismemberment
of the Second Idaho, but all are well
and full of "pep." The Oregon En
gineers head the regiment to which G
company was assigned.
Fred Chapman returned Friday
from Seattle, where he has been for
some time past.
' F:ank Chapman and son, Fred.
spent Sunday with Mrs. Chapman
who is recovering nicely from a rath
er serious operation at a Boise hos
pital. Mrs. Chapman expects to be
able to returtj home Sunday,
Mrs. C. B. Ross, Mrs. H .C. An
dersen and Miss Helen Usadel mo
tored to Caldwell, Monday.
Several Parma people attended
the round-up at Weiser the latter
uart of the week. All pronounce it
the best attraction of the kind ever
nulled off in the west. Welser cer
tainly made a great hit, and his a
right to feel proud over the results.
Mrs. Hedwig Nilsson, of Portland,
is visiting her mother, Mrs. Schmid,
'ltd sister, Mrs.. Carl Eisenminger.
. A. Bates attended the 25th an
of Parma Lodge No. 29,
A. M., at Nampa, Tuesday
uveisar
A. F. <S
night, and reports a splendid time.
Mrs. 3. A. Mitchell. Mrs. I. H.
Kellar and Mrs. D. W. Gromer are
attending a W. C. T. U. meeting at
Caldwell.
While riding a bicycle on the
-.treet the other day little Alvin Her
vey collided with George Wood's
Ford at the bank corner. He was
■onsiderably bruised, but no bones
were broken and he is able to attend
school again.
Sidney M. Knox and Mrs. Eliza
beth Heifer, of Roswell, were mar
ried Tuesday, Oct. 9, in Caldwell, by
.he Rev. B. W. Rice. Mr. Knox has
been a resident of Roswell for the
oast two years and Mrs. Heifer for
one. They both have numerous
friends, who accorded them a hearty
welcome to their new home, Tuesday
evening, a large chivari party turn
ing out for the occasion.
George Obendorf, who lives six
miles south of Parma, reports that a
Chester White sow belonging to him
had a litter of 21 pigs recently. Up
to the present time the sow, which is
four years old, has had 105 pigs. A
sow of the same brood has had 98
pigs.
\
Fanny Lyon Cobb, wife of Calvin
Cobb, publisher of the Statesman,
died Thursday morning, Oct.«lI, at
o'clock, at the family home in
Boise. She had been ill for some
weeks. Funeral services will be held
Thursday afternoon at 5 o'clock and
the remains taken to Chicago for in
terment.
Mrs. B. M. Campbell, of Roswell,
has received wprd from her son who
with the American troops in
France, that the boys are badly in
need of the warm knitted sweaters,
caps, etc., which the women at home
are making and are anxiously await
ing their arrival. Many of the Parma
women are making complete sets ac
cording to government regulation
and will soon have them on the way.
Twenty-two carloads of sheep
shipped, by Stanfield&Vemon, from
Riverview, Ore., arrived in Parma
Tuesday night to be fed in the near
country in transit to Chicago.
A

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