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The Meridian times. (Meridian, Idaho) 1909-1938, January 10, 1919, Image 5

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OBITUARY
Meridian,
.. , f —
Died, at the home of his parents,
three miles southeast of
December 30, 1018, Samuel Lander
liaugh, ton of Mr. and Mrs. Orcn
I^uuderiiuHgh. age 24 years. Death
Was front pneumonia, following in
fluenza, He leaves a fa.. .er, mother, j
and three brothers Mill, him and !
Kolia. AH expect the last named, be- ;
Ing too youtig/entered the service,!
and when the three joined, Sam sei- !
ected the spruce divison, and
good service at the spruce camp nea^
Seattle. He returned to Meridian a
day or loo before being taken down
with the fin, and died in a few
hours after beeing stricken. He was
a hoy well liked by his assoclates.and
being a resident here since a child,
was well and favorable known. The
young man is understood to have car
ried government insurance as a sol
dier.
The funeral was
i
;
r
held N^ew Year's
day, from the undertaking parlors of
\V. S. Ma tee c in Meridian, tiev. Pow
ers officiating.
*
Notice of Aitnuul Meeting.
Notice is hereby given that, trie an
nual meeting of the stockholders of
the Meridian Independent Telephone
company, will lie held (jt the com
pany's office in Meridian, on Tuesday.
January 21, 1919, at 2 o'clock, p.m.
Signed: ELMER E. SIMS.
36.2t secretary.
READ THIS ONE OH TWO TIMES.
"Where are you going?" I asked on
meeting the Flu one day.
"I am going to Bagdad to kill five
thousand people," was the reply.
A few days later I met the Flu re
turning.
"You told me you were going to
Bagdad to kill tive thousand people,"
I said, "but Instead you killed fifty
thousand."
•'I killed only five thousand, as 1
told you I would; the others died of
fright."
+
—A Pilgrim.
ly
of
Notice to Creditors.
Estate of George B. Pinkham, dec
eased.
Notice is hereby given by the un
dersigned Arabelle E. Pinkham, exe
cutrix of the estate of George B.
Pinkham, deceased, to the creditors
Saving claims
of and all persons
against the said deceased, to exhibit
vouchers.
them with the necessary
within six months after the first pub
lication of this notice, to the said
executrix, at the law office of R. H.
Johnson, at 112 N. tith street, Boise,
County of Ada, State of Idaho, this
tran
being the place fixed for the
suction of the business of said estate
Dated Dec. 30, 1918. *
ARABELLE E. PINKHAM,
Executrix of the Estate or George B
Pinkham, deceased.
35-5t
In the Probat# Court
of Ada County, State of Idaho.
In the matter of the estate of Eliz
abeth A. Giller, deceased.
Order to show cause why an order of
sale of real estate should
made. . ,
Annie Armstrong, the administra
tor of the estate of Elizabeth A. Gil
ler, deceased, having filed her peti
tion herein piraying for an order of
sale of all the real estate of said de
cedent, for the purposes therein set
forth. , .
It is therefore ôrdered, by the said
court, that all persons interested
in the estate of said deceased appear
before the said probate court
Wednesday, the 15th day of Jan
uary, 1919, at two o'clock in the af
ternoon of said day, at the court
room of said probate court, in the
county of Ada, to show cause why
an order should not be granted to the
said administrator to sell all of the
real estate of the said deceased or so
much thereof as shall be necessary
And that a-copy of this order be
published at least once a week for
not less than four consecutive weeks
In the Meridian Times, a newspaper
printed aud published in said Ada
county, Idaho, and that said publi
cation be completed at least five days
•prior to the said 15th day of Jan
uary, X919.
R H- DUNLAP, Judge of Probate.
Dated Nov. 30, 1918. 32-5t
not be
on
In the Probate Court
of the County of Ada, State of Idaho.
In the matter of the estate of Lydia
A. Moore, deceased.
Notice of Administrator's Sale of
Real Estate at Private Sale.
Notice is hereby given, that in pur
suance of an order of the Probate
Court, of the County of Ada, State of
Idaho, made on the 19th day of Dec
ember, 1918, in the matter of the es
tate of Lydia A. Moore, deceased, the
undersigned, the administrator
the said estate, will sell at private
sale, to the highest bidder, upon the
terms and conditions heerlnafter
mentioned, on or after the 6ih day
of January, 1919, all the right, HU®,
Interest and estate of the sala Lydia
\ Moore, deceased,at the time of her
death, in aud to the real property
hereinafter described, and ell the
right, title and interest that the said
estate has, by operation of law, or
otherwise, acquired, other than or In
addition to that of said deceased,
at the time of her death, of, In and
to that certain lot, piece or parcel of
land situate, lying aud being in the
County of Ada, State of Idaho, and
more particularly described as fol
lows, tow it ï
t
of
*
JOHNSTON'S
R. L.
«
Barber Shop
Careful Attention
Baths in Connection.
MERIDIAN. IDAHO.
Good Work,
W.Howard Davison
W.B.Davidson,
L A \V VERB
4th Floor
Yates Building.
BOISE, IDAHO.
INFLUENZA
.. . ... , . n - !
Epldemics of influenza have viilted j
1,1,8 country since 1647. It is interest- j
,ri 8 to know that this first epidemic |
brought here from Valencia, !
was
Spain. Since that time there, have i
been numerous epidemics of the dis- j
ln 1889 sod 1890 an epidemic
ease.
of Influenza, starting somewhere In the
Orient, spread first to Busala and
thence over practically the entire ctv
iilzed world. Three years later there
was another flare-up of the disease.
Both times the epidemic spread wider
ly over the United Scats«.
"Although the preeent epidemic
called 'Spanish Influenza,' there la
reason to believe that it originated u
Spain. Some writers who have studied
the question believe that the epidemle
came from the Orient and they call at
tention to the fact that the Germane
mention the disease as occurring along
the eastern front In the summer and
fall of 1917."
i
How can "Spanish Influenza" bs ra*.
agnized?
"There is a* yet no certain way in ;
which a single case of 'Spanish lnflu
enza' can be recognized. On the oth
er httnd, recognition la ekay where
there is a group of cases. In contrast
to the outbreaks of ordinary cough*
and colds, which usually occur in the
cold months, epidemics of influenza
may occur at any season of the year.
Thus the present epidemic raged most
intensely in Europe in May, June and
July. Moreover, in the case of ordi
nary colds, the general symptoms
(fever, pain, depression) are by no
means as severe or as sudden in their
onset as they are la influenza. Final
ly, ordinary colds do not spread
through the community so rapidly or
so extensively as does influenza.
"In most cases a person taken sick
with influenza feels sick rather sud
denly. He feels weak, has pains in the
eyes, ears, head or back, and may be
sore all over. Many patients feel
dizzy, some vomit. Most of the pa
tient* complain of feeling chilly, and
with this cornea a fever In which the
temperature rises to 100 to 104. In
most cases the pulse remains relative
most cases the pulse remains relative
ly slow.
"In appearance one Is struck by the
fact that the patient looks sick. His
eyes and the Inner side of his eyelids
may be slightly 'bloodshot,' or 'con
gested,' as the doctors say. There
may be running from the nose, or
there may be some cough. These signs
of a cold may not be marked ; never
theless the patient looks and feels very
sick.
ware
and
aired,
eneh
effort
"In addition to the appearance and
the symptoms as already described,
examination of the patient's blood may
aid the physician in recognizing 'Span
ish influenza.' for U haa been found
that In this disease the number of
whits corpuscles shows little or no in- I
crease above the normal. It is possl
ble that the laboratory Investigations s
now being made through the National
Research Council aud the United
States Hygienic Laboratory will fur- I | e
nlsh a more certain way in which indi
vidual cases of this disease can be
recognized." |
in
ed
of
lic
cial
the
by
ly
What Is th* cour#« of the disease?
Do people die of it?
"Ordinarily, the fever lasts from
three to four days and the patient re
But while the proportion of
covers.
deaths la the present epidemic has
generally been low, In some places the
outbreak has been severe- and deaths
have been numerous. When death oc
curs it Is usually the result of a
com
plication.''
What causes the disease and how is
K spread?
"Bacteriologists who have studied In
fluenza epidemics In the past have
found tn many of the cases a very
Small rod-shaped germ called, after Its
discoverer, Pfeiffer's bacillus. In other 1 fel
of apparently the same kind of j
disease there were found pneumococci,
the germs of lobar pneumonia. Still
others have been caused by strepto
cocci, and by others germs with long
it
names.
"No matter what particular kind of
causes the epidemic, it is now
germ
believed that Influenza is always
spread from person to person, the
germs being carried with the air along I
with the very small droplets of mucus,
expelled by coughing or sneezing,
forceful talking, and the like by one
who already has the germs of the dis
ease. They may also be carried about
in the air in the form of dust coming
from dried mucus, from coughing and
sneezing, or from careless people who
spit on the floor and on the sidewalk.
As in most other catching diseases, a
person who has only a mild attack of
the disease himself may give a very
severe attack to others."
In
of
What should bo done by thoee who | '
catch the disease?
"It Is very important that every per
son who becomes sick with influeuza
should go home at once and go to bed.
This will he.p keep away dangerous
complications and will, at the same
time, keep the patient from scattering
the disease far and wide. It Is highly I
desirable that no one be allowed to j
sleep in the same room with the pu
In fact, no one but the nurse
tient.
should be allowed in the room.
"If there Is cough and sputum or
running of the eyes and nose, care
should be taken that all such dis
charges are collected on bits of gauze
0" rag or paper napkins and burned
If the patient complains of fever and
headache, he should be given water to
drink, a cold compress to the forehead
and a light sponge. Only such medi
cine should be given as is prescribed
uy the doctor. It is foolish to ask the
druggist to prescribe and may be dan
to take tbs so-called 'safe, sura
des advertised by
rufactumrs.
jerous
und hartn'eM'
patent tnedieiu
"If the patis» a so aituat >d thst h»
he sttendnd äSta-Ei some «p# ffltf
must alio loos arter'others in the fam
J|y> „ û(UUatllP ttia , f ,ich attendant
wtf#r „ «-rapper, apron or go«» over
-till*? in the
the ordinary house clothes
sick room anil slip this off
ft er the others.
chert lettv
Sng to !<«>k
"Nurse* anti attendants will do well
to guard against breathing tn danger
oils disease germs Uy wearing a sir..,.it'
fold of garnie or mask while near the
patient." •
Will a person who has had influenza
before catch the disease again?
-It is well known that an attack of
measles or scarlet fever or smnlipnx
usually protects a person against art
other attack of the same disease. This
appears uol to he true of 'Spanish In
fluenza,'
ports the King of Spain suffered an
attack of influenza during rite epi
demic thirty years ago, and wits again
stricken during the recent outbreak in
Spain.''
How can one guard against Influ
enza?
According to newspaper re
;
"In guarding ikbwiisi disease of alt
kinds, it is Important that the body be
kept strong and able to tight off dls
This can he done by hav
ease germs,
ing a proper proportion of work, play
and rest, by keeping the body well
clothed, and by eating sufficient whole
some and properly selected food. In
connection with diet, it is well to re
member that tit.Ik is one of the best
all-around foods obtainable for adults
as well as children So far as a dis
like influenza is concerned, health
ease
authorities everywhere recognize the
close relation between its spread
While it is
very
and overcrowded homes,
not always possible, especially in
times like the present, to avoid such
overcrowding, people should consider
the health danger and make every
effort to reduce the home overcrowd
ing to a minimum. The value of fresh
air through open windows cannot be
over emphasized.
"When crowding is unavoidable, as
tn street cars, care should be taken to
keep the face so turned as not to in
hale directly the air breathed out by
another person.
"it Is especially Important to be
ware of tlie person wbo coughs or
sneezes without covering his mouth
and nose. It also follows that one
should keep nut of crowds and stuffy
places as much as possible, keep
homes, offices and workshops well
aired, spend some time out of doors
eneh day, walk to work if at all prac
ticable—in short, make every possible
effort to breathe as much pure air as
possible.
"In all health matters follow the ad
vice*of your doctor and obey the regu
lations of your local and state health
officers."
"Cover up each cough and sneeze,
if you don't you'll spread disease."
if you don't you'll spread disease."
Washington, 1». C.—(Special.)—Ac
cording to a report made to the United
s tates Public Health Service, the epi
demie of influenza in Spain has al
ready caused an increase in the preva
| e nce and deaths from pulmonary tu
berenlosis. A similar association be
tween influenza aud tuberculosis was
| recently made by Sir Arthur News
holme, the chief medical officer of the
English public health service, in his
auaiysis of the tuberculosis death rate
in England.
In order that the people of the Unit
ed States may profit by the experience
of other countries Surgeon General
Rupert Blue of the United States Pub
lic Health Service has just issued u
warning emphasizing the need of spe
cial precautions at the present time.
"Experience seems to indicate," says
the Surgeon General, "that persons
whose resistance has been weakened
by an attack of influenza are peculiar
ly susceptible to tuberculosis. With
millions of 1rs people recently affected f
with influenza this country now of
i
1 fel . s conditions favoring the spread of
j tuberculosis.''
«
«
One Million Consumptives in the
United States.
"Thon you consider Ibis a serious
menace?" was asketi. "In my opinion
it is. though I hasten to add It is dis
tinctly one ugainst which tIre 'people
«•an guard. So far as one can esflituare
there are at present about oTre miMion
I cases of tuberculosis tn tire United
There is unfortunately no
States.
complete census available to show ex
actly the Dumber of tuberculosis per
sons lu each state despite the fact that
most of the states have made the dis
ease reportable. In New York city,
where reporting has been in force for
many years, over 35,000 cases of tu
berculosis are registered with the De
Those familiar
partment of Health,
with the situation believe that the ad
dition of unrecognized and un reported
would make the number nearer
50.900. The- very careful health sur
coudueied during the past two
cas*'s
| '
vey
years in Framingham. .Mass, revealed
•200 cases of tulierculosis in a popula
tion of approximately 1.5.000. If these
proportions hold- t rue for the I nited
States as u whole they would indicate
that about one in every hundred per
sons is tuberculous.
I constitutes a source of danger to be
to j guarded against."
Each of these
What to Do.
In his statement to the public Stir
Hue poiuts out how
or
to
the
by
goon General
those who have had influenza should
against tuberculo
protect themselv
"All who have recovered from in
js the Surgeon General,
sis.
fluenza,"
"should have their lungs carefully ex
a mined by a competent physician. In
faet. it is desirable to have several ex
aminations made a inontji apart,
examinations cannot be made through
the clothing nor can they be carried
out in two or three minutes. If the
lungs are found to be free from tuber
cusosis every effort should be made to
keep them so.
right living, good food and plenty ot
fresh air."
Such
This can be done by

ffltf
j A
igned
ery
j be
INTKRURKAN TIME TABLE
BOISE VALLEY TRACTION COMPANY
Leave Boise for Nampa and Caldwell, via Meridian:
■6:30, 8:00, 10:00, 12:00, A M
2:00, 4: 00, 5:00, 6:00.
♦To Nampa Only.
at
j
i work
i the
1
i to
30th.
0 P 11.
Cars Pass Meridian for Boise:—
6:59, 7:45, 9:12. 11:12 A. M.
1:12, 3:12, '5:12.
12. 7:12.'9:12, 11:12 P. M.
Cars Pass Meridian for Nampa and f'aldwell
7:OS, 8:35. 19:33 A ».
5, 2:33, 4:
♦To Nampa Only.
j
!
j will
i
|
year
and arrives at McDermott at
11.35 P M.
: 33. 10
12
McDermott Stub Leaves Onwiler for McDermott : —
7:52 am, 10:31 am, 5:32 pm,
8:05 am, 10:44 am, and 5:45 pm.
in
in
and
j by
out
! and
I
j od
.H
said
by
ity
ed
in
in
:
Leave McDermott for Onwiler:—
8:05 am, 10:55 am, 5:.'
11:08 am. and 6:08 pm.
um and arrive at Onwiler at 8:18 am
Subject to Change Without Notice..
t
Most Valuable Aids
In Preventing Spanish Influenza
FI »RMA LDEH YDE CANDLES
K-H, DISINFECTANT
LYSOL
CHLORIDE OF LIME
SYNOL SOAP
CARBOLIC ACID
FORMALDEHYDE
FOR SALE BY
The Turner Pharmacy
MERIDIAN, IDAHO.
And Don't You Forget It!
All Kinds of
School Supplies
Tablets, Pens, Ink, at AH Prices.
J. C. MCINTOSH
k]
Post Office, Meridian.
:
to
ing
!
i
I
|
'
j
'
; of
1
t
i
CHARLES F. ARZT 4 CO.
C E M EX T
i
Concrete Construction
-o
Flour Mills Concrete
\\ »rehouse* Concrete
Elevators Concrete
ami Millwright Work.
Silos Concrete
Foundations Concrete
\\ alks Concrete
Chimneys Concrete
CONSTRUCTION OFFICE AT
MERIDIAN, IDAHO.
!
«
GLOBE OPTICAL c0.
«
s
*
»
)
J



^
*
U*W4 MAIN ST- BOISE IDAHO.
OLDEST AND LARGEST OPTI
CAL HOI SE IN BOISE. WK HAVE
ALL THE LATEST INSTRUMENTS
FOR MAKING SCIENTIFIC EXAM
INATIONS OF THE EYE AND ALSO
I


-
LENS GRINDING
THIS IX
«
A COMPLETE
PLANT AND FACTORY.
SURES YOU PROMIT AND ACOUR
EYERY PAIR OF
e

»
ATE SERVICE.
GLASSES GUARANTEED TO FIT.
I
« :
t
J I

DR. P. A. SIMMONS, Mgr. DR. GEO. W.WILLIS, Secv.
/V
There's a
Salesman from
Virginia ^
rr
j
0
A
:
This is Real
salesman.
Gravely. That smail chew
satisfies, and the longer
you chew it the better it
tastes.That's why it doesn't
cost anything extra to
chew this class of tobacco.'*
who was chewing and
swapping jfarns with the
men on the Post Office
corner. "Have a chew.''
says he to Jake. Jake
doesn't think he's chew
ing unless his cheek bulges
out like he had the mum
'Call thof a chew?"
snorts. "Sure!" says the
j
i
C
It f«u fmrtkar-1 kit 'j **.» WM«
tlu tni taut cf IUr lau V laéacs» wttà
m< aura Ml,
PEYTON BRAND
Real Gravely Chewing Plug
each piece packed in 3 pouch
jo 3-204 McCarty Bldg., Rhone «43.
T. S. RISSER
YV. H. TVER
— Yttonur\ at Law —
OFFICE IN YATES tic tLDCvÇ
BOISE, IDAHO,
General Law Practice
A ten week 8 vocational coarse des
igned to train young men for cream
ery and ice cream factory work will
be offered at the University of Idaho
December
at Moscow commencing
The student's time will be
divided between practical laboratory
work in the University cream srv and
the class room. This is a splendid
chance- for some Meridian young man
to get into a business tnat is not over
crowded.
30th.
If you wish some home reading for
hese long winter evenings the Times
will furnish The Popular Monthly,
Home Life, The Household, the Gen
tlewoman and the Times all for one
year for $2.05. You must call, soon,
however.
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
in the District Court of the Third
Judicial District of the State of Idaho
in and for Ada county.
H. L. Streeter, plaintiff, vs William
Hufton, Ed Straus. C. E. Nicholson,
and Ada County, a municipal corpor
ation, defendants.
by virtue of an order or sale issued
out of aud under the seal of the
above entitled court, on a judgment
and dcree on cross-complaint of Ed
Straus and C. E. Nicholson, recover
j od in said court on the 30th day of
{November, 1918, against William
Hufton. in an action wherein the said
.H L. Streeter was plaintiff and the
said Ed Straus and C. E. Nicholson
were cross complainants, and
said William Hufton and Ada County
were defendants, said writ duly at
tested on the 17th day of December,
1918. and to the sheriff of Ada
county, Idaho, directed, and to me,
Emmitt Pfost, as such sheriff, deliv
ered on the 17 th day of December,
1918, for execution, commanding and
requiring me as such sheriff to ex
ecute the judgment by making the
sale of the property mentioned in and
by said writ directed to be sold apply
ing the proceeds thereof in conform
ity therewith in the manner prescrib
ed by law and to execute such certifi
cate and deed as by law directed, to
the purchaser or purchasers
property thus directed to be sold, is
described therein a* follows, to-wit:
The lands and premises directed to
be sold by this decree are situated
in Ada county, Idaho, and are more
particularly described as rollows, to
wit: An undivided one-half interest
in arid to lots numbered 11 and 61 of
section 16 township 3 north Range 2
East.of the Boise meridian, as the
said lots are numbered and designat
edon the official plat of said section
16, now on file in the office of the
recorder of Ada county, Idaho, con
taining 15 acres, more or less, to
: gether with all water rights thereun
to belonging or in anywise appertain
ing and consisting principally of fif
teen (15) shares of stock in the New
! York Canal Company, Limited, and
i together with all and singular the
I tenements, hereditaments and appur
| teaances thereunto belonging or in
' anywise appertaining.
Notice is hereby given that on the
11th day of January^ 1919, at the
j hour of 3 o'clock in the afternoon of
' that day, in front of the front' door
; of the Ada County Court House, in
1 Boise City. Ada County. Idaho, I will
t sell at public auction sale all and
i singular the above described an un
divided onc-half interest in and to
said property or so much thereof of
said properly thus directed to be sold
together with the appurtenance»
thereto, as may be sufficient to sat
isfy the judgment as set out in said
writ, together with interest and costs
and expenses of sale, to the highest
bidder in lawful money subject how
ever only to the lien of plaintiff's .
mortgage on a part of said premises.
EMMITT PFOST.
Sheriff of Ada County, Idaho.
Dated Dec. 20th* 1918.
Uader and
the
th<
33-4t
!
Vulcanizing
J. H. Merritt has purchased and taken
charge of the Vulcanizing Business
of C. R. Wallace, and is located In
tire Odd Fellows building, and will
he glad to serve auto owners and all
in need of vulcanizing. AU work is
guaranteed. « «** ,
4. H. MERRITT.
I. B. LAING
:
I CISTERNS# OPEN WELLS, SEPTIC
TANKS, PIPE FITTING.
'PUMPS SET UP AND REPAIRED.
Shop at Rear of W rimer's Black
mith Shop. Meridian, Idaho.
ire Me a Trial.
MERIDIAN. IDAHO.
NEW TIME CARD ON Id!
OREGON SHORT LINE.
The new train schedule which be
j came effective on the
June 2,1918. made several change«,as
Short Line
: follows:
Outbound—
No. 170 passes at 1:26
7. west
j a. m. to connect -"-U» »os
bound, and 18, east heuua.at Nampa.
176 passes Meridian at 12:06
i No.
p. m. to connect with No. -, east
bound.
No. 180 passes Meridian at 7:06
i d. in. to connect with Nos. 5 and 19,
west bound, and No. 6, east bound.
No. 174 tpouyl passes Meridian at
7:31 a. m. for Huntington
change. )
Returning from Nampa—
No. 171 passes Meridian at 4:32
a. m. after connecting with. warn 17.
west bound, and 18, bound.
No. 175 passes* JteriiMafl at
with No. A
• no
; p. m. aftas
j east bptis4
\o. 177 passes
.5 3t, ifter connecting with No. 19,
west hound, and No- 6. east bound.
No. 1.72. i pony! passes Meridian at
j ifl.59 a. m. tno change )
Meridian at 8? 53

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