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The Meridian times. (Meridian, Idaho) 1909-1938, January 24, 1919, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055004/1919-01-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Meridian
no. sw.
MERIDIAN, ADA COUNTY, IDAHO,.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1910.
VOLUME X.
ARMENIAN RELIEF
Captain Robert McCracken, state
director of Armenian relief, and Mr.
S. E. Blaine, county chairman of the
drive, were in Meridian yesterday,
and arranged for a meeting Sunday
evening at the Christian church in
Meridian, at which S. C. Krikorian,
a native Armenian, will speak ,on
conditions in the near East and the
atrocities of the unspeakatde Turk.
Idaho is asked for a fund of $8000
to aid the national drive for thirty
million dollars in aid of the Armen
ian and other suffering people.
ELECTRIC HEAT FROM AR
ROW ROCK TOO EXPENSIVE
The government ownership idea
got a jolt the other day in Boise
when it was shown that power for
pumping was furnished the settle.rs
on the Boise project at a less price
by the Idaho power company than by
the Cana'dian government in a cer
tain section near our northern bor
der. The camiwign against the Idaho
Power company by the nop-pastizan
league was a feature of the recent
campaign. Proof was presented and
not disclaimed, at a recent hearing
before the Idaho utilities commission,
that the heating of the homes in the
Boise valley from the Arrow Rock
dam was too impractical to he
thought of at this time. This for the
simple reason that no invention has
yet been perfected to make the heat
ing of hoifles on a general scale any
thing but an expnse.far beyond heat
ing in other ways, and many times
over the expense of coal.
When Mr. Burns, who had made
a campaign on behalf of the non
partizans, appeared before the com
mission to present his side of the
matter, he disclaimed any technical
knowledge ^of electricity.
RAY HUTCHESON HAS HAD
ENOUGH OF WAR FOR AWHILE
tee
Ray Hutcheson, the brave young
soldier who has just returned home
to Meridian from the European bat
tlefield, having served with honor,
and. bearing wounds, is not much on
display. He went down to Boise this
week and bought a suit of civilian
clothes, and he says he is going to lay
his soldier suit away, and he doesn't
care partcularly whether the moths
eat it or not. Ray is good and tired
of war. He says home looks a good
deal better to him than the River
Rhine. He thinks that now since the
excitement and thrill of the war is
over that home Is the best place to
display his energy and talent. He
says it is too quiet now' anyway in
Europe, since the big guns have
ceased to boom, the cooties coased
to bite, and the poison gasses have
ceased to suffocate. Ray has had
enough of war—at least for this time.
WALTER ANDERSON WAS
IN THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE
Word has been received of special
bravery of a Meridian soldier boy
over seas, in the person of Walter J.
Anderson, son of Mr. and Mrs. John
F. Anderson, of Meridian. He was
in the famous "Iron Division" and
was in the Argonne forest battle for
• twenty days, and helped in holding
this from the huns. Just before ar
riving at Metz he was gassed and was
under treatment for three days, when
he again joined the fighting troops.
He writes that the huns at the hear
ing of the armistice were overjoyed
at the chance to throw down their
arms, as they were tired of fighting.
Walter was one of the Meridian
draft boys but had the extra good
lurk in getting across the pond, and
was surely }n the fight for fair. He
writes that he does not know just
when he will get back to the "good
old U, 8- A,"
to
at
it
a
Card of Thank»,
8c. Louis, Mich.
We wish to express our thanks for
the many kindnesses shown us dur
ing our recent sad bereavement, es
pecially tp the kind friends who aid'
ed our son and ,brother during ins
illness and death; to those who sent
the beautiful floral offerings, and to
all who extended sympathy.
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Beebe,
Signed:
Miss Lulu Beebe. Mr. and Mrs. Stew
art Hinsdale, Mr. and Mrs. Byron J.
Beebe. Mr. and Mrs. Victor V. Beene.
Mr, and Mrs. A. H. Beebe.
We wish to express oui* thanks to
the many friends for their kindness
during the illness, death and funeral
('aril of Thunks.
of our sou.
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Harris.
EDITORIAL MENTION.
Babies are growing in fashion again
around here.
Uncle Sam is being urged to buy
Lower California. But wno'Would he
pay the money to?
A Meridian lady says her husband
has been so good lately that she is
afraid—and she is taking extra care
of him—with the flu around and—
'verything.
The United States civil service
commission has announced an exam
ination to be held at Boise Saturday,
Feb. 8th, to fill the position of rural
carrier from Meridian. Particulars
can be obtained from the postmaster j
at Meridian.
A bronze service tablet has been
received by the rural high school.
On it are inscribed the names of
members of the 1918 graduating
class who entered the military ser
vice of their country: James Fuller,
Alvin Hashbarger, and Lawrence
Hosford.
The fact is the man who is clam
oring most for government owner
ship probably never hired more than
one man at a time in his life (if any)
and naturally doubts the ability or
any private concern to handle a job
where many men are employed.
In the absence of any review of the
troops which fought in the present
war, it might he well (says an east
paper) to have a grand review
of the deserving democrats who held
civilian jobs. It would take a couple
of weeks for them to march through
Washington a dozen abreast.
ern
A subscriber wants to know why
there is no china laundry in Merid
That's quite a story. Way back
ian.
years ago, several women were mak
ing fair wages for some hard wprk
with the clothes line. Along came Lee
Sam and opened a washee. The hus
bands organized a vigilance commit
tee and run the chink out of town,
"and there's never been another
since."
Plans involving millions (of the
people's money) are proposed by
Governor Frazier, non-partlzan gov
ernor of North Dakota, for building
various state owned enterprises. Yet
the guiding spirit back of it all is
Townley, who went Into bankruptcy
court recently and acknowledged him
self a business failure. He had big
debts and a paltry few dollars to
satisfy his creditors—something like
ten cents on the dollar.
A Meridian lady, ttred of taking
care of the children ( with the, noise
and shatter) went with her himbanu
to Boise the other day and stopped
at a restaurant for a real quiet meal,
one that is "cooked by someone else.'*
•They selected a real cozy corner,
and all went well until somebody
started that contraption known as a
player piano. The first loud selection
was the "Chariot Race" march and
it was a race to see who could fin
ish eating first.
Some may wonder if the demo
cratic office holders—- postmasters,
revenue collectors, etc., will he put
under the olvll service and be per
petuated indefinitely in office. If the
republicans are successful in the next
national election any law passed by
the democrats may be repealed by
a republican congress. The civil ser
vice list can be adjusted at any time
congress may see fit to do so. No,
a democrat, (or republican either,)
not fix a life job for his friend.
can
Talking about Meridian ministers—
there is one that we bet you cant
go to sleep while be is preaching,
TIME CARD ON THE
OREGON SHORT LINE
Schedule of arrival and departure
of trains at Meridian statton:
Outbound—
No. 170 passes Meridian at 12.2»
a. m. to connect with Nos. 17, west
bound, and 18, eas* bound,at Nampa.
No. 176 passes Meridian at 11.06
a. m. to connect with No. 4, east
bound. *
No. 180 passes Meridian at
d. m. to connect with Nos. 5 and 19,
west bound, and No. 6, east bound.
No. 174 (pony) passes Mertdiân at
7:91 am. for Huntington (no
change. )
Returning from Nampa—
No, 171 passes Meridian at 3.32
a. m. after connecting with train 17,
to
6.0ft
J.
west bound, and 18, east bound. >
No. 175 passes Meridian at 12.17
p. m. after connecting with No. 4,
east bound.
to No. 177 passes Meridian at 8.13
p- after connecting with No. 19,
weg t bound, and No. 6, east bound.
No. 1 173 (pony) passes Meridian at
9.59 a. m.
DEATH OF CHARLEY HARRIS
ONE OK OCR REST YOUNG MEN
Charles Harris, who died at the
home of his parents in Meridian Sat- is
urday, Jan. 18, 1919, was a young
man of a very winsome disposition ; of
and tine character,
which he was held in this community j
was testified to by the large number
The esteem in |
of young people who attended the
funeral services on Monday after-;
noon. Anyone who really knew i
Charley could not help admiring and |
loving him.
Charlie was born at Dufur, Oregon, !
October 11, 1900. At three years ofj wa
age he came with his parents to '
Nampa. For the last three years He I
1
lived in Meridian. Constitutionally
Charlie was not strong.lt was thought
he was safely recoverng from
the attack of influenza he suffered,
but because of heart trouble he failed
to rally from the relapse that came.
The death of Charlie was a very hard
blow to the mother whose heart was
bound up in her noble boy and who
for some weeks' has been seriously ill.
.Besides his parents, a sister and lit
tle brother mourn his loss from their
home.
The funeral services were conduct
ed by Rev. J.„S. Colvin, of Nampa,
an old friend of the family, assisted
by Rev. Mell of Meridian. The inter
ment was at Nampa.
of
STRIKE AT SPUD FACTORY
IS ALL OVER NOW.
The strike at the Idaho Power com
pany plant in Meridian did not as-'
sume serious proportions, and is now
all over. About a hundred people are
employed at this busy place, drying
potatoes on a big government con
tract. Almut half of the employees are
women and girls, whose work con
sists in flaring and sorting the spuds
and in this work of inspecting the
potatoes the government is very strict
Women seem to be better than men
for this work, which is not hard but
tedious, and they give I letter satis
factSon. Several of the girls, last
week, concluded that their hours
were long, and their pay inadequate.
They did not figure, however, thai {
w r e do not now' have the war time
scarcity of labor, and their places
vacated were soon filled by others.
This week several of the dozen girls
originally, comprising the "strikers" (
applied for work at the old rate and'
were reinstated. .
RUBBER
GOODS
t
OVERSHOES HIGH AND LOW— RUBBERS, PACKS AND HEAVY
SOCKS, RUBBERS AND RUBBER BOOTS FOR EVERYBODY.
? V PREVENTATIVE FOR THE FLU AND PNEUMONIA—AND A
GOOD THING TO HAVE IF YOU HAVE HAD IT.
Tolleth's
SERVICE
QUALITY
PRICES
Most Valuable Aids
In Preventing Spanish Influenza
FORMALDEHYDE CANDLES
B-K DISINFECTANT
LYSOL
CHLORIDE OF LIME
SYNOL SOAP
CARBOLIC ACID
FORM ALDEHYDE
FOR SALE BY
The Turner Pharmacy
MERIDIAN, IDAHO.
BIG SUBSCRIPTION OFFER
HOM£lUi
Ci
T â^
HOl^
.ion
June
jD
iW,
W
A YtieMitm
"OwrTW /
You Get ALL FOUR of These
MAGAZINES and OUR NEWSPAPER
FOR $ 2.05 Order Now
For One
Year Each
THIS EXCEPTIONAL OFFCK IS C.OOM A SiloitT TI.1IK OM.Y
AM renewal ■uhaerli;tiotu*
Subscript iunai mu y l»e new or renewal*
IV* udcà tor one year trout preaaut uute -I eiplratluu.
*TU be ex.
MERIDIAN, IDjAIiO,
THE MERIDIAN TIMES.
SECRETARY McADOO AND
GOVERNMENT CONTROL.
In another column of the Times
is an interesting article from Secre
tary McAdoo favoring five more years
of government control of the rait
ernment ownership, hut presents the
side of the government official.
roads. The Times is apposed to gov-_
Besides, Mr. McAdoo is not enthu
siastic for government ownership anc
admits there are objections. This in
dicates that he received
ection.
wa y
I TWO OLD LAND MARKS GO
WHERE WOODBINE TWINETH
some en
lightment out of the November el
But read the article, any
Two old land marks of Meridian
village will have disappeared by the
end of this week. First, the Bowers
hall, on west Broadway, the scene
of many social affairs and public en
tertainments twelve years ago, has
been torn down by Mr. Wcodmrn,
who did not spare a single piece of
timber, and the lumber moved to a
farm near Nampa. Today V. Richard
son is taking down the last of the
old creamery building on First
street, which was quite an institu
tion years ago. Mr. Richardson will
make good use of the lumber on his
home place.
SERVICES SUNDAY AT THE
METHODIST CHURCH.
{
in numbers and interest. Hope soon
t 0 report an average attendance.The
(
Regular services at the usual hours
next Sunday at the M. E. Church. All
are invited. Sunday evening the con
gregation will go to the Christian
church to hear the address by the
native Armenian.
The Ladies Aid held their first
meeting Wednesday afternoon since
last October. A good attendance.
They will meet every two weeks from
now on.
Next Sunday morning the pastor
will conduct the commnnion service
and receive nfew members.
The congregations are Increasing
Psalm for the week, the 46th.
C. A. QUINN, Pastor.
Phone 4*75.

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^Sll funs n tfivi
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You cannot get the
value of fuel from a poor or
worn-out stove .
We handle a line of high
grade heaters that insure fuel
economy, and any one of them
will be an ornament to your
home. ^ rxr)
i
You look at them bèforffÿou
our
buy, and back of the
guaranty of quality .
Place your orders now for COAL, either lump or stove size. W e can
fill them
Vickers-Sims Hdw. Co.
MERIDIAN. IDAHO.
A. R. STALKER & SON
SUCCESSORS TO RIFE & ROBERTSON
Pine Stock oi Groceries
We don't keep groceries—we sell them.
Bring us your Butter
and Eggs
Si FHE
■\ mGur
' \ 1 /rim?
A pod
A Ph&tqy.
U
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if
GO-OlMive
Mercantile Go.
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it
w jA
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.(>*
Ac \
"•
-
A. R. STALKER & SON
I1EBIDIAS, IDAHO.
- ■
Birds oi a Feather
■and so also do men
flock togethei
of similar opinion and sentiment.
An individual is oftentimes judged
by tl«e company lie keeps.
A man's method!
sociates
index to character.
The person who maintains a Check
ing Account in this Institution is
mure than likely to tie found progres
sive and modern.
Our Officers invite Checking Accounts
■as well as his as*
■frequently prove a faithful
i
The Meetpiax State Bank
II
STATE AND COUNTY DEPOSITORY

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