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The Meridian times. (Meridian, Idaho) 1909-1938, December 17, 1920, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055004/1920-12-17/ed-1/seq-3/

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WE WISH THE READ
ËRS OF THE TIMES A
MERRY CHRISTMAS
AND A HAPPY NEW
YEAR.
'
?
j
Editorial Mention
H fellow who has no oil stock hut ,
^^■few liberty bonds to his credit |
a
"the lucky guy" these days.
' I» »«
I
One of the !
it men in Meridian is up real
■ every morning.
can't always tell.
he
on
of
is
mSÊjk- department of Justice is trying
^^|d out why a tomato that costs
snt wholesale should cost sixty
when served with lettuce in a
rant.
res
BKo Boise Valley Cow Testing as
sociation met recently and decided
■s only 250 cows are being tested
^Hfeork will be discontinued during
IBS' inter months.
in yon county farmers are report
jo he adopting the "sheep me
r of keeping permanent ditch
is free from weeds. Twenty far
l now are using this scheme.
«Ï
01
|. H. White of the Ellison-White
hum bureau left this week for
Itralia and New Zealand, where he
I in the interest of Chautauqua
fk. The Chautauqua system now
fends to the uttermost ends of the
fch. Mr. White will be absent for
jut six months.
m
pa
ed
'he first instinct of the first man
j to'fill his stomach. The next in
Sjct was to have a roof of his own.
ie hearthstone was the primitive
altar. For its own good and the state's
every family should have it's roots in
the earth. Even the nomad tribes
had their own tents. Is the American
fair to himself or his children when
his- impulse is to surround himself
with every comfort and luxury ex
cept the one thing that embraces all,
the four waits of a home?
hit
to
As the echoes of the republican
landslide of November 2d grow faint
er, the propaganda urging league
membership on the United States once
more waxes in strength. A dispatch
from Geneva states that the general
view of the Europeans and Latin Am
ericans is that unless the United
States accepts membership the league
' will not survive. Probably because
they find no one else who will agree
to pay the bills.
f A. P. Moore who has charge of the
leold Stanton place west of town says
"he and his neighbors are in need of
^■electric light service and that in or
Kder to secure the extension of the line
to his. residence and to that of his
Hneighbors, 'they must put up a heavy
■F guarantee and advance payment. This
V is such a large sum that it means that
B they will do without the service for
B awhile. It is thought by some that
B the company makes the amount so
■ large that new extensions during this
■ period of expensive construction will
not be encouraged.
in
to
Up at Sandpoint, Idaho, the women
recently reported the results of their
study of food problems in connection
with the Bonner county farm bureau.
One woman's husband gained enough
weight to bring him up to normal, in
threee months. One boy gained 8
pounds in two months and another
five, as a result of proper feeding. "I
can feed my family with some intelli
gence" says another, and a fifth re
ported that "she had not made so
many pickles this fall."Others learned
the value of whole milk.
Harley Hedges, Miss Clark, Married
Miss Frances Clark of Boise and
Mr. Harley Hedges, a Meridian young
o'clock
man, were married at
Wednesday evening, Dec. 15tli, at the
home of the bride's mother, Mrs. Inez
Clark, residing on Pueblo street, in
Boise, in the presence of relatives of
the contracting parties. After the
ceremony, supper ;was served. The
happy couple left on the midnight
train to the coast for a brief wedding
trip. They will return January 1st,
and make their home on the Witmer
place, a half mile from Onwiler.
The bride has been for five'years a
popular teacher in the Boise schools.
The groom is graduate of the Merid
ian schools and an exemplary young
man. He did his part during the war
and was over seas for many months.
McDermott une does
NOT PAY EXPENSES
It is possible that the McDermott
stub of the Idaho Traction company
will be abandoned in the near future.
The company has presented figures
to the utilities commission to show
that the passenger and freight busi
ness furnished by the patrons of the
line will not pay for the expense of
running it. Passenger business runs
as low as a few cents a day during
the summer season.
The auto has had an appreciable
effect on the business of the line, and
only during the winter season when
the roads are muddy will the loss be
severely felt by the people of the Vic
tory and McDermott neighborhoods.
In reply to the argument that the
people along the line were promised
a permanent service, the company
answers that they should not be com
pelled to keep up the running of cars
when the passengers use other means
to get to market.
In case the line is abandoned, which
will probably be early in the spring,
people residing south of the McDer
mott stub will be served by the main
line of the Interurban, which
parallel, two miles south,
some the change will not be a hard
ship. To others, residing in the
Fairview neighborhood, the discon
tinuance of the Une will be inconven
ient.
It will not be a damage to Meridian
trade, and some residing in the
northwest communities who have be
come strangers to our town, will
again find it convenient to shop here
runs
Thus to
once in a while.
SITLL DIHCOYPHFii
A iMfKXnERED
NEAR
MERIDIAN BY SHERIFF.
A still large enough to m&nufact
' ure 10-gallons of moonshine dally
was discovered Sunday night
? Meridian by Sheriff Pfost, says the
j Capital News.
near
, .
| ,,lacetl under arrest, charging him
with violating the state prohibition
law and is now in jail in default of
a $1000 bond.
Frank Rosso was
!
The man is an Ital
ian.
Sheriff Pfost arrived in Boise with
his prisoner Monday afternoon at 4
o'clock, having taken him while on
hunt for a stolen automobile, which
he failed to locate.
The sheriff believes the owner of
the still intended going into business
on an extensive scale as 500 gallons
of mash in the state of fermentation
were discovered on the place, which
is known as the Ross Willburn tract,
now owned by Joe Lund, 1 mile east
and one mile south of Meridian. The
still was in two parts, one of which
was found in a cabin and the other
under a straw stack and like others
found by the sheriff, is said to have
been operated under filthy conditions.
t
ROSENLOF IS ELECTED
FROM NAMPA DISTRICT
At the annua! election cf the Nam
pa and Meridian Irrigation district,
held in the liree precincts Tuesday,
Frank Rosenlcf, of Nampa, was elect
ed as a member cf the board from the
Nampa district. The other candidate
was Clyde Gougie of Nampa, who re
ceived a total of 67 votes to Roseu
lof's 283 votes. The votes by precincts
was: Nampa, Rosoulof 262; Gougie
45; Meridian Roseniof 76;Gougie 19;
Perkins Rosor.iof 18, Gougie 3.
Mr. Roseniof succeeds Ed Dewey,
who was not a candidate for re-elec
tion.
WERE CRIMES. COMMITTED
BY LOCAL PEOPLE?
Sheriff Pfost and County Attorney
Delana were down Saturday to in
vestigate the assault on Lloyd Adams
and find out if a motive for the crime
could he found. The man stepped to
the door one day last week and was
hit on the head by an unknown indi
vidual. Adams was unconcious for
several hours. No clue has been found
but some seem to think that both the
assault and the postofiice robbery
were committed by local people. A
clue has been found and develop
ments are expected.
The postoffice robbery is also being
investigated by the United States
marshal at Boise, and it is the reputa
tion of the government to usually go
to quite a bit of trouble in finding
the perpetrator of even a small rob
bery of government property.
The principal reason for believing
the robbery was the work of am
ateurs was the fact that only the in
experienced would touch government
property.
THE NEED OF HOT
SCHOOL LUNCHES
Since the hot lunches were adopted
in Meridian there has been inquiry as
to the purpose and reason for this
-move. The Times has gathered some
authentic data which it presents here
with. Our only purpose is to help to
fit the Meridian boy and girl so they
will have an equal show with others
in the battle that will come later in
life.
According to government statistics
there are six milion children, or
•one out of every four, who are suffer
ing from under nourishment. More
than 350,000 children die every year
from poor or insufficient food. Not
from lack of food, understand.
One way to help the malnourished
child is a hot lunch at school, either a
hot dish to supplement the lunch
brought from home or the entire
lunch served at the school. The great
est need is found in the rural school
like we have at Meridian. Many child
ren leave their homes at 7.30 or 8.00
o'clock in the morning and do not re
turn again until 5 or 5.30 in the ev
ening. They snatch a hurried break
fast in the morning, make a long trip
by wagon, or horseback, or auto, or
perhaps walk; have a cold lunch at
noon and make the return trip at
"night, having only a cold lunch that
had been prepared in a hurry.
Children grow and develop rapidly
in the years from the first to the
eighth grade but they cannot pro
gress mentally or physically without
good food. You know how often a
growing child likes to eat. A cold
lunch now and then is not bad, but
five days in a week for the principal
meal (counting the hours)
months in the year grows monoto
nous.
in
of
a
of
nine
How would you like to study on a
cold day with no warm food inside of
you? Good buildings and teachers are
not enough.Teachers say the children
appear to be in better condition for
6tudy when they have a hot dish at
and the discipline is better.All
noon ,
think the children do better work in
'the afternoon.
Another point, is that when the hot
lunch- is served in Meridian it is not
iced that it helps to improve the man
ners of many a little tot when he
comes in contact with the other child
ren at the lunch hour. It enables him
to learn also, what food he should
eat to make his little body healthy
and strong. This is a (»operative
work with his mother at home, and is
designed as a help, not a substitute.
be
the
the
OWN YOUR OWN HOME.
There is a nomadic streak in the
American character and being foot
loose has certain advantages; but just
now people are paying the piper.
Out of the 4 million Americans who
drive their own automobiles, it is a
reasonable guess that not half own
the their homes. Surplus money has been
be- used to buy the means to move from
will state to state on holiday jaunts in
stead 'it to buy the right to remain
in one spot.
to
i
AN APPEAL TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE
Three end one-half million children In Eaitern and Central Europe have •
no alternative to disaster between now and next harvest except American aid. *
For months these most helpless sufferers in the track of
1 •
war have been ad- | •
udttod to American feeding-stations only if tragically undernourished, and ! *
have received American medical aid only if desperately threatened by death ! «
from disease.
Wlnter 1s closing down. The money of many nations is valueless outside !
their own boundaries. Economic and crop conditions make famine, with its •
terrible train of diseases, a certain visitor until next harvest. Inevitably the | !
helpless children will suffer most.
No child can grow to health and sanity on ! »
the pitiful makeshifts for food with which millions of European adults must >
content themselves this winter. It Is obvious that the remedy can come only j »
from outsida. ' *
1 »
America saved 8,000,000 European children winter before last.
Normal j •
recuperation cut the need nearly in half last year, but unusual conditions have j £
resulted In scant shrinkage of child destitution during the twelvemonth Just I »
past. The response of America must now decide whether 8,500,000 of these J
charges, in acute distress, shall begin to be turned away la January from
more than IT,000 asylums, hospitals, clinics and feeding-stations dependent
on American support. There would be no tragedy in history so sweeping or
so destructive of those who can deserve no evil.
The undersigned organizations, working among every race and creed,
many engaged also la other forms of relief, agree unanimously that the
plight of these helpless children should have complete priority in overseas
charity until the situation is met. This is an issue without politics and
without religious tines. There can be no danger of pauperization, for the
823,000.000 for child food, and the 810,000.000 for medical service that
seek, will relieve only the critical cases.
we
The medical supplies, of course,
must be an unqualified gift, but for every American dollar used in child
feeding, the governments and communities aided furnish two dollars In the
form of transportation, rent, labor, clerical help, cash contributions and such
food supplies as are locally obtainable.
America has not failed in the past in great heartedness,
had a more poignant call than this-^Coutributions should be turned
the local committees which are now being formed for this national collection,
or sent to Franklin K. Lane, Treasurer, Guaranty Trust Co., New York City.
She has never
over to
EUROPEAN RELIEF COUNCIL
H.rb.rt H.ov.r, Chairman
Franklin K. Lana, Treasurer
Cemprlalna:
Ed " Federal Council of Churches of Chrlat la
a£irf^f h K , . America, by Arthur J. Brown
American Red Cross, by Llvineston ~ , . .
Farrand, Chairman Knlyhtt of _ Colum bua, by Jamea
American Friends' Service Committee Flaherty. Supreme Knight
(Quakers), by Rufus M. June*. Chair- M - C. A., by C. V. Hibbard. Intar
man national Committee
Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, by T. W. C. A., by Mias Sarah S. Lyon. Ha
lt! i v Warburg tional Board
NOW IS THE TIME TO
PREPARE
For winter. Put your car in good
shape so that it will perform
better in cold weather.
!
We take pride in our shop and
Jo give you honest
)
our
workmanship.
Don't neglect your battery. Have
us examine it free of charge.
OUR ACCESSORIES ARE NECESSORIES.
ROGGE MOTOR CO.
FISK TIRES
AJAX TIRES
'UP IN MABEL'S ROOM"
AT PINNEY', BOISE
At the Pinney Theater on Friday
and Saturday Dec. 17-18th, A. H.
Woods will present for an engage
ment of two days, matinee Saturday,
the brilliant New York farce success,
"Up In Mable's Room" which was
one of the conspicuous metropolitan
successes of last season.
"Up In Mable's Room" has been
described as a face deluex and de
looks. It consists of three acts and
is the work of Wilson Collison&Otto
Harbach. It may be briefly described
as a series of romantic and farcical
complications.
Garry gave an article to Mabie as a
gift, in a moment of sentimental
aberration, and foolishly had it in
scribed in bold, big letters "Mabie
from Garry."
Then Garry fell in love with and
married a sweet but painfully unso
phisticated little girl and went to
spend his honeymoon at the country
home of a friend. Who should turn
up as one of the guests, but Mabie?
It must be confessed that Mabie was
a wee bit catty. At any rate, Mabie
let Garry know that she had the pres
ent and that she intended to display
it in a way that might prove detri
mental to Garry's welfare. Of course
she didn't really mean it, but Garry
thought she did, so he tried to steal
the present. It was not easy, and the
fun that ensued kept New York roar
ing with laughter for months. Not
the least of the charms of "Up In
Mable's Room" is it's elaborate and
beautiful display of lingerie. The
company is one of the best and in
cludes many Broadway favorites.
A POOR WEEK FOR NEWS
AROUND MERIDIAN.
This has been a poor week for news.
One fellow who »'as to have been op
erated on has postponed the job, so
we cannot mention his demise, if such
a thing should happen.We have heard
a pretty good clue to the Meridian
post-office robbery but can't say any
thing about it fob fear of "spilling the
beans." A small child was nearly run
over by an auto, but it wasn't—so an
inch is as good as a mile. A woman
was threshed by her husband and he
has hardly been around home for a
week—but we dare not tell hts name.
\Ve had prepared a long article about
the ralu—but the sun U out this morn
ing and It would sound foolish. Yes.
this has been a poor week for news.
SANTA CLAUS'
Headquarters
s/
*¥■
[O
The Biggest Display of Toys Meridian Has Ever
Shown. Everything for the Boys and
Girls, Little and Big
The Toy Assortment Inluiles Dolls, Dishes, Stoves, ABC Books, Boy
Scout and Camp Fire Girls' Books, Nursery Rhymes, etc..
All kinds of Musical Toys, including Phonographs, Pianos, Motes,
Horns, Whistles, and Harmonicas,
Kiddie Kars, Sam-E-Cars, Wagons,and Velocipedes. Pocket Knives,
Watches, Handkerchiefs, Xmas Cards and Booklets,
Candies, Nuts, Fruits of all Kinds.
We have an especially nice line o.f—
*
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Dinnerware and Fancy China
There is nothing: nicer for a Christ-man l'reseut, and we have some nice
designs esepeially for gifts.
PLAIN WHITE,
We have a large collection of OVEN CLASS WARE, consisting of Casser
oles, Raking Dishes, Pie Plates and Custard Cups.
OCR FANCY GLASSWARE
Consists of Bud Vases, Water Sets, Berry Sets, Sugars, Creamers, etc.
Our Open Stock Dinnerware consists of
*
GOLD BAND,
AND BLUE BIRD PATTERNS.
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CO OPERATIVE MERCANTILE CO
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Meridian, Idaho,
STALKER'S
Fringed Auto Robes
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*

For Christmas

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PLAID AND PLAIN,
WE HAVE A LARGE ASSORTMENT
THE BEST ROBES IN TOWN
!

!
AT OUR REGULAR PRICE WHICHIS $11.00, $10.00, $23.00
and up to $35.00
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Choice of Entire Stock at 20 per Cent Off
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Our Store is Full ®f Useful Christmas Gifts
COME AND LOOK FOR YOURSELF
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Vickers-Sims Hardware Co.

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*
Meridian, Idaho.
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m3880$K3«0«0
We Find Time To Smile
When a fellow has completely mastered his job
can be called truly efficient — he smiles ms he toilsl
work to such a man is a pleasurable effort
The officers and employees of this bank kuow tbeir jobs
down to the last detail, and find plenty of time to smile
upon our customers as they attend to their business.
Being human" pays!
and
The Meridian State Bank
?
STATE AND COUNTY DEPOSITORY
I
Presents lrom all
ÇàLover the world
*/Ain this '
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T O L L E T M 'S
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SERVICE - QUALITY - PRICES
MERIDIAN ,
IDAHO.

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