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The Meridian times. (Meridian, Idaho) 1909-1938, November 04, 1921, Image 6

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055004/1921-11-04/ed-1/seq-6/

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MONEY DECLINES
IN EFFICIENCY
Enormous Addition to the Na
tional Income Is Not Real
Wealth Increase.
(HIE TO RISE IN PRICES
National Bureau of Economic Research,
After Exhaustive Study, Make* Pub
lie Figure* Showing Variation In
Dollar's Purchasing Power.
New York, Oct 27.—The total na
tional income of the United States In
1918 was 61 billion dollars, as com
pared with 34.4 billions In 1913; but
this increase In dollars did not repre
sent a like Increase-la production. Most
of it was due to the rise In prices, for
the dollar of 1918 and 1919 was a much
less eiltcient dollar than that of 1013.
The actual total of commodities pro
duced Increased very little. If at all,
and a large part of those which were
produced were war materials, not of
a kind really benefiting consumers.
Consequently, individual Incomes,
estimated on a per capita basis, rising
from $340 in 1910 and $354 lu 1013,
to $586 In 1018, represent n)i>re dollars
but little or no real Increase, because
the $586 of 1018 Is equivalent to only
$372 In terms of the purchasing power
of 1913.
These are the most Important find
ings of the National Bureau of Eco
nomic Research, made public today
In udvance of the formal publication
of the results of a year's study of
"Income In the United States." This
Study, the most exhaustive ever made
of the income question In this country,
has been conducted by Wesley Clair
Mitchell, Wlllforfl I. King, Frederick
It. Macaulay and Oswald W. lCnauth,
under the auspices and direction of a
board of nineteen directors. Including
men prominent In many fields of busi
ness, education, labor, agriculture, eco
nomics and practical statistics, and
representing mnuy divergent points of
view.
This table exhibits the main find
ings. Including the equivalent value
of per capita Income In terms of the
1013 purchasing power:
Total Na- Per Capita
Ilona 1 Inc'e Income
Year— (BlUlons) In Dollars
190».
Per Capita
Income In
"1913 Dol's"
3333
r. - -
3 119
1910.
M 4
IN
349
1911.
31.2
333
338
1913.
33.0
346
34«
1912.
34.4
-4
864
1914.
83.3
336
333
1916
363
350
1:* <>
4- t
446
400
1917
63.9
I a
396
1913.
61.0
686
373
Distribution of Income.
The report says that only one out
of a hundred (1 per cent) Income
* celvers In the United Stute» In 1918
hud incomes of $8,000 or more, and
that this one per cent had 14 per cent
of the national Income,
representing Incomes above $3,200,
had 20 per cent of the total,
cent. Including Income above $2,300,
had ueurly 35 per cent of the total ;
the most prosperous 20 per cent, In
cluding Income ubove $1,750, had about
47 per ceut. Eighty per cent of the
Income receivers hud incomes below
$1,750, receiving about 53 per cent of
the total Income.
Shares of Labor and Capital.
In most of the years since 1912, the
bureau finds that Iu the principal or
ganized industries, wages and salaries
were about 70 per cent of the total In
come; while capital (Including man
agement) received about 30 per cent,
out of which were paid rent. Interest
and profits; but these proportions va
ried materially with relative prosper
ity and depression. In 1916, for ex
ample, the share of capital increased
to about 35 per cent, with 65 per cent
to labor, while In 1919 capltal'a share
, fell to about 22 per cent, while labor
got about 78. Of the total payments
to employees In the highly organized
industries, about 92 per cent goes to
the manual workers and clerical staffs,
while 8 per cent goes to officials.
Share of the Farmer.
The farmers, who during the past
decade have made up about 16 per
cent of the total of gainfully employed,
had from 12 to 13 per cent of the na
tlo.ml Income In the years between
1910 and 1916 Inclusive; since 1917
they have been receiving 16 to 17 per
cent, or a somewhat higher propor
tion, as the following figures from the
report show :
IV
Five per cent.
Ten per
Per Cent
1910
12 •>
1911
11.9
1912
.12.3
1913
. 12.6
1914
.12.9
1916
.13.1
1916
. 12.8
1917
.163
1918
.17.0
1919
.16.6
Sources of Production.
As for the sources of national In
come, the bureau finds, taking a gen
era! average since 1910, that agrlcul
TO DISCUSS PROPOSED LAWS
Argentine Branch of international Law
Association Draws Up Pro
gram for Meeting.
Aires. — The Argentine
Buenos
branch of the International Law asso
ciation has prepared, at the request
of the executive committee In London,
for discussion at the con
a program
ferenee of the association which Is
•chcduled to be held in Buenos Aalres
In 1922.
ture contribute» about 17 per cent of
the total, manufacturing about 30 per
cent, transportation about 9 per cent,
government about 5 per cent, mining
a little more than 3 per cent, banking
a little over 1 per cent. The manjr
miscellaneous employments, profes
sional men, retailers, jobbers, mer
chants, domestics, etc., too numerous
to list specifically, contribute 83 per
cent. In other words, our highly or
ganized industries, even if we include
all manufacturing, mining, transporta
tion, hanking, and government activi
ties such as education and road-build
ing, produce only about half of the na
tional Income. The rest is due to the
efforts of small independent- workers.
Income Tax Olecrenancies.
The report estimates that the num
ber of persons In 1018 having Incomes
ever $2,000, was 6,300,000, and that
their total Income was over 23 btllion
dollars. Income tax'returns, however,
showed only 2,908,000 persons having
over $2,000, and their total reported
Income was less than 14 billion dob
lars. This discrepancy is due In part
to technical evasions and straight Ille
gal withholdings, but also In part to
the existence of tax-exempt income.
What this means In terms of the in
come tax Is that the government re
ceived in iôi» about half a billion dol
lars less than It would have, If all
persons receiving $2,000 had paid their
full umotiub
Contribution of Housewives.
The contribution of the 20,000,000
American housewives Is not included
by the bureuu iu the national income
because they are not paid In money.
But the report points out that If they
were paid at the lowest possible figure
(the average recompense of personal
and domestic service) their addition to
the total national Income would be
ubout one-third, or 18 billions. On
that basis, the bureau gives the follow
ing conjectural figure as to the fluctua
tion of the housewife's contribution
to the national Income since 1009:
Total
Individual Contribution
Contribution (in Billions)
(In Dollars) of Dollars)
18.85
Year—
1909.
tsoo
1910.
9.00
1911.
MX)
1912.
626
9.82
191S.
620
1914.

10.19
1915.
660
10.84
1916.
600
11.94
1917.
650
14.30
16.30
1918.
760
1919.
900
18.46
Income In Other Countries.
Both the total national Income and
the per capita Income are larger lu
the United States than in any othei
country. The report estimates this at
the relative standing of the four coun
tries named at the outbrenk of the
war:
Nat'l Income Income
(Billions Per Capita
ol Dollars) (In Dollars)
1914
United States . 333.6
United Kingdom
Germany .
Austria .
1333
10 8
243
10 6
146
1.8
263
The report is in press, and will b*
published early In November.
How the Bureau la Constituted.
The Nntlonul Bureau of Economie
Research was organized after the wai
by n group of persons who had com 4
to reullze the need for accurate and
scientific collation of statistical Infor
mution as a basis for Intelligent solu
tion of national problems. The direc
tors of the bureau are T. 8. Adams,
advisor to the Treasury department!
John R. Commons, of the University
of Wisconsin; John P. Frey, editor oi
the International Molders' Journal)
Edwin F. Gay, president of the New
York Evening Post; Harry W. Laldler,
secretary of the Intercollegiate Social
ist society; El wood Mead, professor ol
rural Institutions, University of Cali
fornia; Wesley Clair Mitchell, New
School for Social Research ; J. K. Ster
rett, of the firm of Price, Waterhous*
and company, accountants; N. I. Stone,
Inbor manager, Hlckey-Freeraan com
pany; Allyn A. Young, professor ol
economics, Harvard university; also,
the following appointed by the or
»anlzntlons named: F. P. Fish, of the
National Industrial Conference board ;
Hugh Frnyne, American Federation ot
Labor; David Friday, American Eco
nomlc association; W. R. Ingalls, En
glneerlng council; J. M.. Larkin. In
dustrial
I
Relations
Association
America; George E. Roberts, Ameri
can Bankers' association; Malcolm O.
Rorty, American Statistical associa
Bon; A. W. Shaw, Periodical Publish
ers' association; and Gray Silver,
Aniej-lcan Federation of Farm Bu
reaus.
ot
It Is a rule of the bureau that each
director must approve the findings of
the research staff, or state his spe
cie objections as part of the report
In this way. hlus Is eliminated, for
methods and results are under
con
stant supervision from men whose
points of view are rllssimllar.
Williams Press Congress President.
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands.—Walter
Wilhams. University of
.School of Journalism was re-elected
president of the Press Congress of the
World by acclamation.
Missouri
The con*
gress passed a resolution petition'ng
President Harding to admit
repre
sentatives of the press to the disarma
ment conference deliberations.
The topics to be taken up and de
cided Include;
Inviolability of malison land and
In wartime; International organization
of labor In sea und river navigation ;
International law on freight contracts ;
regulations for the use of submarines
during war; rules for the recognition
of a "de facto" government by foreign
states, and international responsibility
of the state for damages that may be
suffered by foreigners during the prog
ress of civil wars.
■M
THE MERIDIAN TIMES,
FARM
POULTRY
CHRISTMAS BEST FOR GEESE
Thea« Fowl* Require Little Care and
Attention Compared With
Return* They Bring.
(Prepared by the United States Department
of Agriculture.)
Roast goose and apple sauce !
Christmas In many homes Is In
complete without them, and for that
reason the best season In which to
market the goose Is the latter part
of December, although there Is a lim
ited demand all the year.
Goose raising Is not so extensively
engaged In as duck raising, the con
ditions under which they can be suc
cessfully raised being almost entirely
different from those necessary for suc
cessful duck raising. The duck, be
ing smaller, can be raised In a more
limited space than can the goose, the
latter needing free range and water,
while the former has been proved to
do well without water.
While the goose cannot profitably
be raised in us large numbers as the
duck, still It cannot justly be termed
unprofitable. There are many places
on a farm that are worthless for cul
tlvallon that could be utilized with ex
cellent results for goose raising.
Fields that have strenrns, branches, or
unused springs on them could be
turned to good advantage by maldng
them into goose pastures. A goose on
range will gij^her the largest portion
of its food, consisting of grasses, In
sects. and other animal and vegetable
matter to be found in the fields and
brooks.
Young geese âre fattened by placing
them In a pen, not too large, so that
they will not exercise too much, and
by feeding them once a day all they
will eat up clean of a moist mash
made of one-half shorts and two-thirds
cornmeal, and two feeds dally of com
with some oats or barley. While fat
tening young geese they should be
kept as quiet as possible; no excite
ment whatever should disturb them,
poultry specialists of the United
States Department of Agriculture say.
When feeding, approach them quiet
ly, and do not frighten them. At ten
weeks of age, or when the tips of the
n
(
km
X

k ss
i
>
Many Farmer»' Wives Hreter to
Dree* Geese Before Marketing
Them to Obtain the Feather*.
wings reach the tall, they are ready
for market. If they have been heavily
fed, and should weigh between eight
and ten pounds. Most young geese
from general fnrms are sold when they
are from five to eight months old.
When young goslings are to be
dressed for market, they are first
stuck In the roof of the mouth with a
Umg-bladed knife and then stunned
by hitting them a sharp, quick blow
on the head. For dry pleklng the
picker uses a box In front of him
about the height of the knees, holding
the bird with the left hand and clasp
ing the feet and wings together; he
places the head of the bird against the
box and holds It in place with the
kr.ee. Pick the feathers from the body
I of the bird, then dampen the right
hand and brush the body to remove
the down. Leave about two Inches
of feathers on the neck, and also leave
feathers on the wings at the first
joint. Lay the wings against the body
of the birds and tie a string around
to hold In position. Place the birds,
when picked. In cohi water for an
hour or so to plump them ; If they are
In the water too long they arc liable
to bleach and become water-soaked.
They are then lped up In barrels ready
:o ship to market.
A
j
j
i
Any margin over market prices re
reived for breeding stock Is pure prof
it, and the demand, especially for
hatching eggs, comes at u time when
the egg baskets are easily filled.
Be on the lookout for dampness In
the poultry houses. Where freezing
is common, close-built houses are very
apt to show condensation of moisture
on celling and walls. Too large a num
ber of birds in a house will also cause
this.
In either hen-hatched or Incubator- !
hatched flocks, there are likely to be !
some backward, slow-growing, slow
feathering chicks. If the hnteh Is In
the brooder, separate these backward
chicks, and give them to a hen, or
put them with a younger hnteh A
turkey lieu that has no family Is an
ideal moil»-- for them.
;
j
KeKrrcnm
GM3I/ΕPss
Sopyrtght, laax. Wcatorn New»pap«r Union.
"Think not so much of what thou
hast not as of what thou hast; but of
the things thou hast select ths best
and then reflect how eagerly they
would have been sought if thou hadn't
them not."
SOME GOOD EATINGS.
Buttermilk and sour milk have both
been used as a specific for prolonging
life, renewing the tissues
and preserving beauty.
Buttermilk has been
recommended by physi
cians for people troubled
with liver trouble, gout
or rheumntisru.
Buttermilk Is often re.
talned by stomachs which
ennnot digest milk. A
glass of cold or hot buttermilk, ac
cording to the season or temperature,
with a sandwich, makes a most satis
fying luncheon. For those who are
fond of buttermilk soup this recipe will
be enjoyed ;
Buttermilk Soup.—Kent a quart of
buttermilk until nearly boiling; do not
let It boll or It will curdle. Pour over
three well beaten eggs, season with
salt and sugar and serve with n grat
ing of nutmeg un top of each soup
plate.
Buttermilk Ginger Bread.—Take one
cupful of molasses, one well-beaten
egg, two-thirds of a cupful of butter
milk, a third of a cupful of meltçd
butter or shortening, two teaspoonfuls
of sodn, spices to taste and one tnhle
spoonful of ginger; add flour to make
a batter which drops like a veil from
the spoon.
Buttermilk may be used In bread.
Just scalding the buttqrmilk and using
It as any other liquid.
For dumplings a cupful of butter
milk In place of sweet milk and use
baking powder ns usual ; the result
Is a fine tasty dumpling.
Egg and Potato Dish.—Try out two
slices of fat salt pork cut In cubes;
in this brown a cupful of bread cubes
and an equal quantity of cold boiled
potatoes. When all are well browned,
add two eggs slightly beaten. Heat
slowly, stirring constantly until the
eggs are cooked. Season with salt and
pepper and garnish with parsley.
Cocoanut Soup.—Grate the meat of
one fresh coconut or the dry coconut
may be used if the sugar Is soaked
out of It. O>ok a tablespoonful of
butter, add a tablespoonful of flour
and u teaspoonful of curry powder.
Add a quart of milk and water, a pint
of each, and the coconut. Simmer a
minutes, add salt, pepper and a
cupful of cooked peas.
Cheese Omelet.—Beat two eggs
slightly, add one-half teaspoonful of
butter, salt and "pepper to taste and
a tablespoonful of cheese grated. Add
a tablespoonful of butter to the omelet
pan and when hot pour In the mixture.
Cook until Arm, sprinkle with cheese
and serve with graham bread sand
wiches.
;mj:
esi
C
w
The things that are really lor thee,
gravitate to thee. He that Omis God
a sweet, enveloping thought to li'.m,
sever counts his company.—Emerson
FOR THE INVALID.
If a member of the family becomes
111, It Is often a problem just what to
prepare to tempt the ap
petite and to reduce the
recipe to proportions for
one person.
Many times it is pos
sible to prepare enough
of any dish for the en
tire family, but when
small amounts are to be
served the following sug
gestions may be of serv
ice:
Potato Soup for One.—Scald two
thirds of a cupful of milk to which
one-slxth of a slice of onion has been
added. Remove the onion after the
milk Is scalded and pour the milk over
one-quarter of a cupful of finely
mashed potato. Melt One-half table
spoonful of butter, stir in one-half
tablespoonful of flour, one salt spoon
ful of salt, a few grains of celery salt
and white pepper. Add to theUk
and potato mixture and cook until
smooth. Strain and serve very hot,
sprinkled with minced parsley. A tea
Tm °4 TÜT aik,S " st
to this soup. Add just before serving,
Cream of Pea Soup.—Take
t*°\
L £
one
third of a cupful of green peas—fresh
ly cooked or canned will do;
quarter of a cupful of water, one-quar
ter of n tablespoonl'ul of butter, three
quarters of a tahlespoonful of flour,
two-thirds of a cupful of milk, one
salt spoonful of salt, a few grains of
white pepper.
one
Add the water to the
j pens and simmer ten minutes,
j through a sieve and thicken with the
i butter ami flour cooked together. Add
milk and seasonings,
hot cup and serve with
bread.
Rub
Strain into
! it well, pity . n
! soup iben - ii
j ihe soup (
! egg Is m-'<'
j the ii'ppi
j
j N, Vi
Y\.'
| *
croutons of
Beef Balls. Take a piece of round
steak from the top of the round, cut In
strips and scrape with the grain of the
ment, using a sharp teaspoon.
. . ■■■■■ Form
the meat Inlo halls sprinkle with salt
and cook In a hoi frying pan. shaking
them over the heat until well seared.
; Arrange on hutferhd toast nod garnish
with parsley or water
j When egg Is o ' Vd t
rnPR*.
<> imy soup.
°f Hip hot
' ' * pih;p rim
' NfÏPr tit»
jot «rtnî
WRIGLEYS
' Every Meal**
llllllllillllllllllllllfty
After
1111
F
W Next time you
I want to concern
r träte on a Piece
of work Just slip
a stick of WRIGLEY'S
between your teeth.
It's a wonderful help
in dally tasks —and
sports as well.
a
g
Hazards
disappear
and hard
Places come easy,
for WRIGLEY'S
gives you comfort
and poise—it adds
the zest that
means success.
mm
A
't
'a
A
M.LU
r •izi
He
5*
m
iWIli
A great deal
for 5c
The
SEALED TIGHT
KEPT RIGHT
Flavor
Lasts
,Vi*
ss/
Bll
French Dogs Killed in War.
Some interesting figures are given
In the newspaper Le Journal on the
reduction of the canine population In
France during the war. It was esti
mated there were 3,855,329 dogs in
France In 1914, while in 1920 the num
ber had diminished to 2,657,389 of
which 575,000 are pets, 2,082,380 watch
dogs. Of 1,197,940 which disappeared
the majority were killed by projectiles,
while employed as message bearers
with the French army. It Is noted
that while the numbers decreased the
standard of leading breeds In France
fn no way suffered.
A Feeling of Security
You naturally feel secure when you
know that the medicine you are about to
take is absolutely pure and contains no
harmful or habit producing drugs.
Such a medicine is Dr. Kilmer's Swamp
Root, kidney, liver and bladder remedy.
The same standard of purity, strength
and excellence is maintained in every
bottle of Swamp-Root.
It is scientifically compounded from
vegetable herbs.
It is not a stimulant and is taken in
teaspoonful doses.
It is not recommended for everything.
" natureB great helper in relieving
V" ove fj° min g kidney, liver and blad
a trouble8 ', .
evtre Wla î?"^ < £-, puri , ty {?
R^f ^ o£ Kjlmer 8 Swamp
! If 'you need a medicine, you should
have the best. On sale at all drug stores
*" bottles of two sizes, medium and large,
1 However, if you wish first to try this
t-o* 4 P*?P arati< » ten cents to Dr.
mention this paper.—Advertisement,
!
! Ice Cream Soda for Two, Please
: He (thoughtfully)—Don't you like
that sort of person who says the
right word at the right time?
She (coyly)—Yes, especially when
I'm dry and thtrfety.
DYED HER SKIRT, DRESS,
SWEATER AND DRAPERIES
Each _ package of "Diamond Dyes"
tains directions so simple any woman
dye or tint her
skirts,
con
ca a
worn, shabby dresses,
. "waists, coats, stockings, sweater*»,
coverings, draperies, hangings, everything,
even if she has never dyed before. Buy
Diamond Dyes' —no other kind—then per
feet home dyeing is sure because Diamond
DyeB are guaranteed not to spot, fade,
streak, or run. Tell your druggist whether
the material you wish to dye is wool or
silk, or whether it is linen, cotton
mixed goods.—advertisement.
or
Most people are liberal with their
any
symnn'hy because It doesn't cost
thing.
Realities of matrimony are usually
less pleasing than the Illusions of love.
iRINF Nlliht «ud Morning.
" ^ *i av * Strong, Healthy
?'•*■ H they Tire,Itch,
£°K SmartorBum, if Sore,
MUIR EVES Gramd d frd' >na M et ll ° f
Infantor Adult. At all Druggists. Write for
- Bujlr. Mutas Ef» irmnty Ce,, CMeagt
Ujj
Life As I See It.
Man Is Just a handful of mud, bal
a good woman can mold him lntt
something worth while.—LouisvilH
Courier-Journal.
A Lady of Distinction
Is recognized by the delicate fasclnat
lng Influence of the perfume she usel ■
A bath with Cutlcura Soup und hot 9
water to thoroughly cleanse the pores,
followed by a dusting with Cuticur» 9
Talcum powder usually means a eleu, 9
sweet, healthy skin.— Advertisement, j
Wealth of Fertilizer in Coal.
A four-foot seam of coal contain«
enough ammonium sulphate to fertil
ize the land above It for more than
500 years.
!
A dog's bark Is worse than his bite;
but, unfortunately, a mosquito doesn't
bark.
EASY TO KILL
RATS
Y amf
i MICE
STEARNS'
ELECTRIC PASTE
By thing the Geniun
Ready for Us*— Bettei Than Tnp
Directions In 16 lan*n»|es m ererr bps -
Rats, Mice, Cockroaches, Ante snd Wsjwng
destroy food sod property end sre cam«»
I disease. Steams' Electric Putt force; these
Kmm from the bnlUU^g for water and fresh»»
86c and 31.60. "Money back if It fall*.
C. 8. Government bay* It.
VICTIMS
RESCUED
Kidney, liver, bladder and uric add
troubles are most dangerous
cause of their insidious attack*
Heed the first warning they fP
that they need attention by taka*
GOLD MEDAL
BEES2EQ3

!
I
I
Ths world's standard remedy for tlx** 9
disorders will often ward off theS * iBll M
eases and strengthen the body ag °L, m
further attacks. Three sizes, all drug*»» g
Look for the name Gold M«d»l «"
and accept no imitation
SELDOM SEE
SJJfÂÜÂSÂÂÿ!
hi» ankl», hock. «iß«.
i
I.
on
throat.
11*
I
»
A
if
____will clean It off wffhoatJjT
HWiH ing up lh* hors». No I W§
(H. : Bffli H4» hair gone. Concent»
—only ■ f.w drops
Bf iS »ppiic.tiow km M
■psol»Ûos«ructioM.»n<lli*8 ■
i —
W. N. U-, 8alt Lake City, No.

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