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The Meridian times. (Meridian, Idaho) 1909-1938, March 31, 1922, Image 7

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055004/1922-03-31/ed-1/seq-7/

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CLEAN PACKAGE FOR BUTTER
ters
are
do
ant
a
a
Carefully Packed Product Givee More
Enjoyment to Consumer Than
Blip-Shod Parcel.
A
(Prepared by the United States Department
of Agriculture.)
For the same reason that a man
prefers to eat his meals from a clean
tablecloth he prefers to get the butter
he eats In a clean and attractive pack
age—It helps him to get more enjoy
ment from his food and that means he
really gets more value out of It, even
though curelessly packed products
may contain JugLas much food value
as those that are put up carefully.
The package into which butter Is
put Is of more Importance than most
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Working Butter before Putting in
Package.
food packages, because the product
which it holds is extremely sensitive
to outside influences, especially odors.
Men who have made a business of
studying market conditions and meth
ods hove long given attention to the
package problem and they are still at
IL This year at the National Dairy
show, held In St. Paul, Minn., October
8 to 15, the United States Department
of-Agriculture had an unusual show
of butter packages that proved of as
much interest as a lot of curios. The
department has collected packages
from tlie various countries of the
world that make butter in consider
able quantities, and they were shown
in comparison with packages that are
used in our own country. In addition
there were examples of good and of
poor packing.
FAVOR SWEET-CREAM BUTTER
Product in Storage for Year at Nor
folk, Va., Scores Higher Than
That on New York Market.
After remaining In storage for one
year, samples of sweet-cream butter
recently inspected at Norfolk, Va.,
scored higher than the highest score
for butter quoted on - the New York
market. These samples, which re
ceived scores averaging 93.47, were
representative ef 1,000,000 pounds of
butter packed for the United States
navy under the supervision of the
United States Department of Agricul
ture. The scoring was done by a spe
cialist from the dairy division and a
representative of a commercial butter
firm In New York city.
"This butter, which was made for
the navy last year," said the Inspec
tors, "was of such tine quality that we
cannot neglect the opportunity to com
ment upon -the comparatively small
amount of extra work required to pro«
duee a product of this quality as com
pared with the average butter found
on the large markets."
This butter was made from a per
fectly sweet cream, with a compara
tively high salt content and low mois
ture. The moisture content did not
exceed 13.5 per cent. After one year
In storage only one sample scored as
low as 92 !4. Of the other 50 sam
ples, 24 scored 94, two scored 93Vi
and 24 scored 93.
Consumers who are accustomed to
a pronounced flavor in butter do not
at first show favor - to sweet-cream
butter as it Is somewhat lacking in
this respect when fresh. A demand
for sweet-cream butter, however, Is
growing steadily, according to butter
dealers handling this product. On be
ing held in storage the flavor becomes
more pronounced, and for this reason
sweet-cream butter Is often scored
higher after storage than when fresh.
For storage purposes such a butter
Is far superior to the ordinary butter,
which usually loses In quality during
the storage period.
High-Priced 8ire.
Any sire is high priced that will
not puss on to Ills offspring the char
acters which go to make them desir
able from the market standpoint.
Signs of Tuberculosis.
A cow that stays thin In spite of
good feed and has a cough allows
pretty sure signs of tuberculosis. Let
A veterinarian test her.
. ; Producers Not Boarders.
nie cows ob a soccessful dairy fana
must bo producers and not boarders.
JANET'S REWARD
By ELIZABETH M. DUKES
dû. 1ÏS2, by McClure Newspaper
Syndicate.
"My heavens, Janet ! Look how
you
waste time peeling those spuds; why
don't you boil them, Jackets and all?"
Janet's brown eyes flashed; then a
hopeless look drugged down the
ners of a normally sweet mouth.
"Oh, Dick 1 You never think It mat
ters how I do things, and all my school
lessons on making a home attractive
are Just wasted on you, for you don't
care, no matter how hard I try."
"I'm no softy 1 Give me plenty of
grub and a place to sleep, and what
do I care about your fol-de-rols? Oil
cloth on the table l Shine up the tin
plates! Posies in a mug I"
A sneer twisted his none too pleas
ant expression still more, as the man
swung out of the cabin.
Janet let her busy hands hang Idle
a moment In utter discouragement.
She had pulled her chair Into the door
way, where, as she peeled the potatoes,
her eyes could sweep over a wide
range down the green mountainside to
a valley threaded with the silver cob
webs of rivers. The great peaks tow
ered again on the farther side, blue,
green and ,wonderful. The clouds
rested on their crests and cool winds
came drifting over to the lonely girl;
but these brought no message of com
fort today.
cor
A happy girlhood In the valley
school had been Janet's. The girls all
worked for their board and she had
delighted to put into practice the
dainty household devices the school
taught.
Was It only a year ago that the
death of her quiet, hardworking father
had brought her back to the cabin of
the brother who refused to provide
more money for "schooling taught by
a pack of tom-fool old maids?"
Dick had never cared to know any
thing better than the squalid moun
tain ways. A "batch's" round of bis
cuits, yellow with soda, meat cooked
to rags and flat-tasting canned goods
did not seem to have sickened him. At
least, he sauced the food Janet pre
pared most carefully with his sneers.
The year as his housekeeper seemed
like eons to the poor girl; how long
had It really been since she had heard
words of appreciation and courtesy?
After all, what was the use of try
ing any more? Why mix the biscuits
according to rule, why sweep and
scrub and polish the tinware until It
shone like silver, why put mountain
pinks In a tumbler for the center of
the table? She won only mockery and
scorn, even before the rough strangers
who sometimes shared bed and board
at their cabin.
The blue of the distant peaks
seemed to swim like a blue lake
through her bitter tears. There was a
mournful wall in the wind—It was say
ing, "No use ! You are doomed to be
dull-eyed old slattern before
come a
you are thirty."
The discouraged little head was still
bent beneath its burden of chestnut
braids when—what was that? Hoof
beats ! Yes, and a strange voice.
"I'm sorry to bother you, but I can't
ride farther without a glass of milk. I
see you have a cow pastured here, but
Til be grateful for condensed!"
The man, hat in hand, smiled pleas
antly at her as he sank down on the
doorstep with a Jingle of spurs.
"There's milk If you wish it," Janet
replied, with a bright tinge of color
concealing the tear stains ; "but It Is
almost noon. Surely you will stop
here—it's a long ride to the next
cabin/
"I didn't Intend to," was the laugh
ing confession, "for I'd rather ride
empty than swim in grease as at most
of these shacks. But yours is a real
picture place; and c&n It be I smell
baked beans?"
"You smell my regular Saturday
dinner," said Janet.
did full justice to Janet s food
symphony In brown and gold; the
fluffy mashed potatoes, yellow with
cream, the smoking beans topped with
crisp pork, the steamed brown bread
stuccoed with plump raisins, and the
custard pie whose thick and golden
quivered under a meringue
light as foam and over a crust that
"rumbled with flaky richness.
Dick ate In silence for once; per
haps the stranger's compliments for
the menu twisted his mouth a bit, but
he said nothing. He did not leave un
til Steve Sargent, the new forest
ranger had risen reluctantly from the
shining white oilcloth and started on
his way. Dick even grumbled an In
vitation when Sargent announced he
would be back that way next week.
"This Is a place to ride fasting seven
days to get to at last. I hope I shan t
wear out my welcome, but Im afraid
I'm going to try to this summer. '
"If at first you don't succeed, try,
try again!" teased Janet, releasing her
hand from Sargent's hearty clasp—a
that yet had something In It so
and reverent that she was to
He
filling
clasp
tender
dream of it happily.
"That's a mighty good fellow If the
tales I've heard are O. K.,'' said Dick,
as he swung onto his own horse. He
seemed to take quite a shine to your
fancy ways, Janet. Wouldn't be a bad
to stand In with him for
thlng for me
lumber reasons."
• Janet only nodded in response ; her
eyes were fixed on the peaks beyond.
They were stlli swimming like a blue
lake, but her tears were happy one*
now
"What If I had given up In discour
g gement before today?" she asked her*
she watched that distant fig
her a patting salut*.
self, a*
ure turn to wave
with his broad ranger's hat
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These are
In short, building
Ever since last September
Distinctiveness and Individuality
in This Model.
LOOKS LARGER THAN IT IS
8*ven Rooms and Thro« Sleeping
Porches Are Shown In tho Plans
—Better Than Average, and
One to Be Proud Of.
By WILLIAM A. RADFORD
Mr. William A. Radford will answer
queatlona and give advice FREE OF
COST on all subjects pertaining to the
subject of building, for the readers of thla
paper. On account of bis wide experience
aa Editor, Author and Manufacturer, he
Is, without doubt, the highest authority
on all these subjects. Address all Inquiries
to William A. Radford, No. 1827 Prairie
avenue, Chicago, 111., and only Inclose
two-cent stamp for reply.
"Building Permits 98 Per Cent Ahead
at Year Ago," "Building Contracts In
dicate Wonderful Year,
some of the headlines which catch the
eye these days,
has become a live news topic, and
anything relative to that subject Is
sure of a prominent headline In the
papers.
the Increased activity In building has
and
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First Floor Plan.
21
is
In
it
been quite noticeable and certainly en
couraging, for it marks the turn In the
situation. Lethargic for four years,
the building business Is gradually com
ing out of Its stupor. What will be
the immediate effect of this condition?
More homes. Today there are about
1,500,000 homes needed to take care
of the population, not allowing for the
normal Increase in population - each
year.
these 1,500,000 families a place to live
in and will help reduce the rents of
those who choose that way.
This is tlie golden opportunity for
those who have been paying the fiddler
for the last three years to get even.
Those tenants who have been planning
to build a home of their own but have
hesitated because of prices, now have
an opportunity,
and price reductions have brought
down the. cost of building to a point
More homes will give some of
Wage adjustments
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Second Floor Plan.
the poor man can give the mat
The year 1922
homes built.
We would like to build a home our
selves If we could build one along
the lines of the charming home illus
trated herewith. Here Is a home'that
has distinctiveness and individuality.
To all-appearances It Is* very broad
pretentious, and consequently expen
where
ter some thought,
should see many L
I alve home of considerable size, but It |
-ets that appearance from the arrange- I
ment. The porte cochere, covered
driveway, which Is becomti-g quite
popular since the advent of the rear
garage, adds breadth to the building
and helps to give the Impression of
bigness, although the actual di
mensions are only 36 by 32 feet.
This house Is stucco finish over hol
low tile, although It can be stucco - over
brick or frame, depending upon Ute
location and price of the materials.
▲ front porch extends part way
around the side and leads the way to
the front entrance which opens Into
a small hall. This hall In turn opens
on one side Into the living room, on
the opposite side into the dining
room.
The living room is one of Ideally
shaped and sized lounging rooms, 14
by 23 feet, with fireplace in one wall
and flanking built-in bookcases. All
along the right side of the living room
are windows and doors Insuring plenty
of daylight. The room opens out on
to a small side porch and also a sun
parlor which Is Inclosed.
And in a similar manner the dining
room Is provided with excellent light
ing facilities from two sides.
EHrectly in back of the dining room,
which Is 13 by IT feet, Is a kitchen,
13 by 10 feet, not much space when
old-fashioned kitchens are considered,
but amply large enough for this mod
em home because of compact arrange
ment and use of bullt-ln features.
There Is a small pantry in connection.
A rear hall leading from the kitchen
Is
gives access to a bathroom and rear
bedroom, 12 by 9 feet 6 Inches. Thig
rear bedroom has the additional con
venience of a small sleeping porch.
On the second floor the plans call
for three unusually large bright bed
rooms, the front or master bedroom
being, 29 by 14 feet, and the others
21 by 14 feet 6 Inches and 11 by 14
feet A sleeping porch, 11 by 11 feet,
is connected with the bedroom.
This seven-room arrangement Is a
very comfortable and pleasing one.
In case another bedroom Is needed
it can be installed without additional
cost, merely by dividing the large bed
room In two. But If there are not too
many In the family, the present ar
rangement Is quite satisfactory and
economical.
This home Is a little better than
the average, and certainly one that
any man should be proud to own.
COCK FIGHTING OLD "SPORT"
Practiced in China Since the Earliest
Recorded Timet
tion In the West.
-Its Introduc
Cock fighting Is probably the most
ancient sport In the world. Known
since the earliest antiquity In China,
It was also popular In India, the home
of the wild jungle cock, from which
these fiercest of all feathered fighters
were probably originally bred. From
India It spread to Egypt and all
through Asia Minor.
Its Introduction to the West through
the Greeks came about In a most dra
matic manner. The story goes tha#
Tbemlstocles called a halt on the
march of his men against the Per
sians because he happened to see a
pair of game-cocks fighting. To the
group about him he made a great
speech, admonishing them to meet
their enemies with the same spirit. In
commémoration of the victory Athens
had public cock ßghts each year
thereafter, and from this somewhat
solemn beginning it rapidly became a
popular sport.
Earlier mention of It shows that
there was no sentiment against IL
since one William Fltz Stephen tells in
some detail of the "Cocking matches"
arranged by the masters at boy*'
schools, especially to celebrate Shrove
Tueeday. Henry VIII bad a cockpit
bullt ln hla palac« at Whitehall.
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WHAT IS GOOD MILK?
By Prof. Ben IL Eldredge,
Dairy Expert, Ext Dlv. U. A. C.
In speaking of milk too often we
use the term good milk when referring
to the composition or amount of fat
It contains, meaning that rich milk is
Good milk. Milk may contain a high
percentage of fat but unless It is
clean it is not good milk. Good milk
must be clean. And milk to be good
must come from a healthy cow.
The first requisite in the selection
of a milk cow is that she be In per
fect health. Milk Should never be
used from a cow that has an Inflam
mation of the udder. On this too much
stress can not be laid, for the udder,
more than any other organ of the
body should be In a condition of ab
solute health.
The oow should be clean and this
means that she should be ln denn sur
roundings. Often we find some refer
ence made to a dirty cow when ibe
condemnation should not be laid on
the cow herself, but upon the bidlvlA
ual who provides filthy surroundings.
The cow, while naturally a dean ani
mal, Is sometimes forced to acquire
unclean habits from the very nature
and condition of the yards and stables
in which she Is confined.
Grooming of the oow is an import
ant matter which receives scant at
tention. Proper use of the curry cotab
and brush or cattle card promotes the
health of the cow materially, for it
stimulates the action of the skin, and
a dean, active Bkln, with the cow, as
In all our domestic animals. Is an Im
portant factor In health. Where cattle
are properly looked after, careful
grooming is a matter which receives
regular dally attention.
With a dean cow In clean surround
, ings, the next thing to receive the at
tention In the production of clean milk
is the milker himself. He should be
a person of cleanly habits and not
dad in foul or dirty working clothing.
Milking is not dirty work unless it is
made so, and it Is more often made a
piece of drudgery by reason of the at
tendant dirty conditions than what it
should be—the production of human
food in dean and sanitary surround
ings. There is no higher art than die
production of a superior article of hu
man food.
EGGS FROM GOOD STOCK ARE
REQUIRED
For Hatching, Eggs Must be Selected
With Gréât Care
Successful incubation depends first;
upon securing eggs friom strong vigor
ous stock, well matted, housed, and
fed under conditions that make for
health and vigor ; second upon the con
ditions under which the eggs are held
and upon their age, and finally on the
incubation according to Professor By
ron Alder, Poultry Husbandman of the
Utah Agricultural College, Logan,
Utah. The breeding stock should not
be overfed. Free range conditions are
best. If kept In closed runs a varied
supply of grains and animal food
(milk, meat scraps, insects, etc.)
should be given with green food, grit,
and fresh water always available to
the fowls. The house should be kept
clean, dry, and free from mites and
other pests. All weak or inferior
fowls should be culled out of the breed
ing pens.
During cold weather the eggs should
be gathered twice daily and kept in a
place where they will not be chilled
or overheated, preferably at a temper
ature between 50. degrees and 65 de
grees F. The eggs should not be stored
in a damp mouldy cellar or around
decaying fruit or vegetables. Use only
good sized eggs of uniform shape and
eolor. Small, long, abnormal or poor
ly shaped eggs should be discarded.
The hatchability of the eggs deterior
ates very rapidly after they are 10 to
12 days old. Do not try bo hatch
brown shelled and white shelled eggs
In the same incubator as the former
usually take a little longer to hatch.
Never hatch fresh eggs to a lot that
has started to incubate. Strong vig
orous chicks eanniot be hatched by
hens or incubators from weak genus
from eggs that are old or have not
had the proper care.
I
or
FRUIT IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
IN UTAH COUNTY
With K. D. Wadley as project leader
day school was held In Provo,
It was attended
a
a
in
one
Utah, In February,
by 74 project leaders and cooperators.
Dr. B. L. Richards, Associate Profes
sor of Botany at the Utah Agricultural
College, talked on control of fruit pests
and diseases and Dr. Wanlass, Dean
of Commerce at the same Institution,
talked on cooperative marketing.
PLAINS BEING LAID FOR SECOND
ENCAMPMENT AT U. A. C.
Already the Summer Encampment
the Utah Agricultural College Cam
pus next August promises to be big
ger than ever, even though attendance
last summer was 947. One of the fea
tures this year .wilt be tlie meeting of
the Utah Irrigation and Drainage
Congress which will hold Its sessions
nt the college during the Eaeunipment.
on
BEAVER COUNTY GETS GOOD
PRICE FOR EGGS
Poultry-man in Beaver County are
finding that organization pays. The
first Shipment of eggs tent out of the
county by Um Association brought 30
.-euts a dozen wirile the local price
was twenty.
!l SrtLT LAKE
Business
winter larars. All rarietiea.
a
it
Directory
OUR SAYINGS-INVESTMENT PLAN
Will enable you to build up a fund which
will give you an Independent income. Send
for our illustrated book. No. A-4, which show»
what systematic investment and compound
interest will do.
PALMER BOND & MORTGAGE CO.
Suite 410-1* Welker Bank Bulletin*
OLDSMOBILE
DEALERS WANTED—In Utah, Idaho. Ne
vada, Wyoming. Liberal com ml.»ion—wiU
•end representative on request.
A. E. TOURSSEN—Distributor.
YOU NEED PRINTING
Patronize your home publisher. Hi* price*
are juat as good or better than you can get
elsewhere. Your work will be given prompt
and satisfactory attention by your printer
merchant. Help to build up your locaf Indus
triel.
Hardy farm
raised stock
that will
make early
BABY CHICKS
VOGELER SEED CO.
Salt Laka City
Utah
Are You
Planning a Vacation?
Utah, Idaho and Wyoming offer
some wonderful opportunities for
sightseeing, hunting, fishing and
resflpg. The Salt Lake Chamber
of Commerce has prepared a book
let entitled the "Center of Scenic
America" telling about these
intermountain beauty spots.
For Free Copy Send Postcard to
H. S. Dahlberg, Box 1543, Salt Laka
UKULELES I
LESSONS FREE
0
!
m
(
leani topDiy that soft, sweet
You
luring Hawaiian Music in but a few
evenings. We show you how to do it
Free. Thousands have learned to play
and
now happy through this
wonderful and easy system. You
can learn too. We have a large
stock of assorted Hawaiian Ukuleles
that
ial price of $9.35.
If for any reason you are not satis
fied within ten days from date of pur
chase money will be refunded upon
return of instrument to our store. Ref
erence any Bank or Mercantile Co., In
Salt Lake City.
are offering at tlie very spec
REMEMBER THE INSTRUCTION IS FREE
Fill in tlie coupon below and gret your
Ukulele and Free Instructions Today
GLEN 5S0S.-R0BERTS PIANO CO.
161 S. Main, Salt Lake Gty, Utah.
Gentlemen: Enclosed please find $»..«
for which you will ship me one Ha
waiian Ukulele, and the Free in
structions how to play it. Yours truly
Name..............
P. O. Dox..
City....
I
..State.
BUSINESS COLLEGES
L. D. B. BÜ SI NEsV COLLEGE.
Schoo', of Efficiency. All commercial branches.
Catalog free. 60 N. Main St, Salt Lake City.
PLEATING A BUTTONS
Aceordian. Side, Box Pleating, Hemstitching.
Buttons, Buttonholes, Kid Corse* Parlor.
SEE YOUR PUBLISHER
Sec your printer for Binding, Ruling and Looso
Leaf Devices.
FIXTURES AND SHOW CASES^_^
ufacturers of Bank; Office and
"Art in Fixtures is our
Salt Lake Cabinet A Fixture Co.
Store Fixture*.
Busineß*."
DEPARTMENT 8Tores^ ^
''^nd^to^walkersTsalt lakh city
Utgjh, for anything you cannot get in you
horn« «tore*.
UTAH METAL WORKS, M'fg.s Typo Metals.
Married Men Trustwo.'tlry
Statistics Indicate that married me
are more trustworthy than single ma
in the ratio of 6 to I, probably becaus
of their increased sense of rosponsi
bility.
Term Gasoline Is Modern
The geological survey says the*
there were some materials like oui
present gasoline used as far back as
the Second century, but the
gasoline was coined within the last
twenty or thirty years.
Sufficient Aoyhow
"Is this good soup, waiter? I'm ter
ribly fond of soup." "Yes, sir. Call
recommend it very highly sir." "Well,
briqg me a couple of döllars' worth."
—Kansas Cty Stär,

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