OCR Interpretation


Idaho tri-weekly world. (Idaho City, Idaho) 1875-1875, April 25, 1875, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055026/1875-04-25/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

the world.
,■}
of the Creation
andfaR
When excavating at Kouyiunjik
- during the Daily Telegraph expedition
to Assyria, I discovered the missing
portion of the first column of the Do
Huge tablet, an account of which T
i^ent homeland in the same trench I
»subsequently found the fragment that
I afterwards recognized as part of the
-'Chaldean story of the Creation, which
relic I have noticed already iu your col
umns. I excavated further on anoth
er portion belonging to this story, far
more precious, in fact, I think the
most interesting and remarkable Cun
eiform tablet yet discovered. This
-contains the story of man's orignal in
nocence, the temptation and the fall.
T was an the eve of departing when I
-found it, and had not time to properly
•examine my great prize- I only cop
ied the two. or three first lines—which,
: 4 is I had then no idea of the subject
-of the tablet—did not appear very
valuable, and I forthwith packed it in
the box for transportation to England,
• -where it arrived safely, and was pre
; rented by the proprietors of the Daily
Telegraph, with the rest of their col
lection, to the British Museum. On
• my return to England I made some
other discoveries among my store, and
in the pursuit of these this fragment
was overlooked. I subsequently went a
second time to Assyria, and returned
to England in June, 1874, but 1 had
no leisure to look again at these par
ticular legends until the end of Janu
my of this year. Then, starting with
the fragment of the Creation in the
Daily Telegraph collection, which I
had first noticed, I liegun to collect
other portions of the series, and among
these I soon found the overlooked frag
ments which I had excava 7 ?d at Kou
viuujik, the first lines of which I took
-down in my note book of my first ex
pedition. I subsequently found sc ver
bal pieces in the museum collection, and
«all join or form parts of a continuous
series of legends, giving the history
of the world from the creation down
to some time after the fall of man.
Linked with this, I found also other
.series of legends of primitive history,
including the story of the building of
the tower of Babel and of the confu
sion of tongues.
The first series, which I may call
""The Story of the Creation and Fall,"
-when complete must have consisted of
•nine or ten tables at least, and the his
tory upon it is much longer and fuller
than the corresponding account in the
Boo): of Genesis. With respect to
these Genesis narratives a furious
strife has existed for many years; ev
<ry word has been scanned by eager
scholars, and every possible meaning
which the various passages could bear
lias been suggested; while the age
and autoority of the narratives have
been discussed on all sides. In par
ticular, it may be said that the account
-<»f the fall of man, the her
itage of all Christian countries, has
fceen the centre pf all this controversy,
for it is one of the pivots on which
the Christian religion tarns. The
world-wide importance of these sub
jects will therefore give the newly-dis
•covered inscriptions, and especially
the one relating to the Fall, an unpar
alleled value, and I am glad, indeed,
that such a treasure should have re
tsnlted from your expédition.
Whatever the primitive account may
Tiavé been from which the earlier part
of the Book of Genesis was copied, It
U evident that the brief narration
given in the Pentateuch omits a num-
ber of incidents and explanations— for
instance, as to the origin of evil, the
fall of the angele, the wickedness of
the serpent* eta. Such points as these
«*• incladed in the Cuneiform narra-
| m »J little
iMUraaslip
rvi
Iuofof
' IO
ft chaos or
T
I
I
the
•tad, vwIm» the» ..
confusion. The desolate and empty,
state of the imiverse and a generation
by chaos of monsters are vividly giv
en. The chaos is presided over by a
female power named Tisalat and Tiar
mat, co8responding to the Thalatth of
Berosusi but as it proceeds the Assyr
ian account agrees rather with the Bi
ble than with the short account from
Berosus. We are told, in the inscrip
tions, of the fall of the celestial being
who appears to correspond to Satan.
In his ambition he raises his hand
against the sanctuary of the God of
heaven, and the description of him is
really magnificent. He is represented
riding in a chariot through celestial
space, surrounded by the storms, with
the lightning playing before him and
wielding a thunderbolt as a weapon.
This rebellion leads to a war in
heaven and the conquest of the pow
ers of evil, the gods in due course cre
ating the universe in stages, as in the
Mosaic narrative, surveying each step
of the work ami pronouncing it good.
The divine work culminates in the cre
ation of man, who is made upright
and free from evil, and endowed by the
gods with the noble faculty of speech.
The Deity then delivers a long ad
dress to the newly created being, in
structing him in all his duties and
privileges, and pointing out the glory
of his state. But this condition of
blessing does not last long before man,
yielding to temptation, falls; and the
Deity then pronounces upon him a ter
rible curse, invoking on his head all of
the evils which have since afflicted
humanity. These last details are, as
I have before stated, upon the frag
ments which I excavated during my
first journey to Assyria, and the dis
covery of this single relic, in my opin
ion, increases many times over the Dai
ly Telegraph collection.
I have at present recovered no more
of the story, and am not yet in a po
sition to give the full translation
and details, but I hope during the ?
spring to find time to search
over the collection of smaller frag
meats of tablets, and to light upon
any smaller parts of the legends which
may have escaped me. There wilj
arise, besides, a number of important j
questions as to the date and origin of
the legends, their comparison with
the Biblical narrative, and as to how
far they may supplement the Mosaic
account
It will probably be some few months
before my researches are sufficiently
advanced to publish them in full;
meanwhile the interest which Ï know
the public feel in these discoveries
must be my excuse for this short and
imperfect notice in your columns.
When my investigations are completed
I will publish a full account and trans
lation of these Genesis legends, all of
which I have now been fortunate
enough to find, some in the old muse
um collection, others by excavation in
Assyria.— Cor. London Daily Tele
graph.
Jewel Robberies — Jehan Valter, a
French journalist, relates, apropos of
the robbery of Dudley's diamonds, sev
ens! anecdotes about jewel robberies.
He tells how a speculator presented a
report to the Directory making out
that the celebrated church of Lovette
contained JßlO, 000,000 worth in dia
monds, etc. Barras and Carnot in
formed Bonaparte of the fact, bat the
young General refused to march on
the place because be would have to
expose a corps of 10,000, and would
probably find nothing when he got
there. In time he did manage to seize
on the church, and found that all the
diamonds had been replaced by glass.
M. Valter also tells how the mother of
the late French Emperor the Quere
Hortense, when she was
th»
in
Iuofof
IO tfl
or
a
of
Bi
of
is
in
in
of
Lve
_____ w Brit
more remarkable as there we» » &***
fuse made about the
breuil toward the clore of the Sreare
Empire. He had a lawsuit with hia
wife, and an outcry wae raised against
the Marquis continuing a member of
the Legon of Honor. It then came
out that he was one of the Royalists
who had aided the Prussians to puli
down the statute of Napoleon from
the top of the column of Vendôme, and
that while engaged in this act he had
tied an order of the Legion of Honor
to the tail of his horse, and dragged
it in the mud. Yet toward the end of
the reign of the Third Napoleon he
wore the ribbon and was in receipt of
a Government pension.
What Befell a Bio Indian Who
Had'nt a Wooden Leo.
A band of Crow Indians, enroute to
Washington, stopped at Chicago, and,
of course, visited the Exposition.
What befell one of them is thus rela
ted by the Times:
When tlie Indians reached the gal
lery they sang several hymns, and
danced war break-downs till the arches
trembled. Then they descended and
went to the north end to look at the
machinery. There were several buzz
saws—large, circular ones—revolv
ing at the rate of ever so many thou
sand times in a minute or more. The
Indians were deeply interested spec
tators, and a Milwaukee man with a
wooden leg noticed them. He had uf
of ten rea( j j n ),j 8 Sunday-school books
that the North American Indian is a
great imitator, and he determined to
test the truth of the assertion. So
What did this Milwaukee man do
hut stick his left timber before the
saw. and in a twinkling the lower
part, boot and all, was lying^on the
floor. To say that Thin Billy was as
tonished would be hut a rnild way of
expressing his feelings. He looked at
the hoot, and he looked at the man.
? Xhen he tragically remarked in his
owrï | native language, "It shall never
he said that a pale face was more he
roic than an Indian Chief.* He folded
his blanket more closely about his
£jj Ve a b>ok 0 f scorn at the stir
j pounding whites, and then stuck one
of his legs in front of the swift re
volving cutter. But no sooner had he
done so than he was more astonished
than ever. He gave a yell, and,
frightened nearly to death, the atten
dant quickly shut off the steam, and
the saw ceased its revolutions. Per
haps it was not demolished by the
other Indians. There wasn't a piece
left big enough for a fine comb; and
the attendant aforesaid narrowly es
caped with his life. In the meantime
the Milwaukee man had disappeared,
and has not been seen since. As
Black Foot and hia friends were leav
ing the hall, he was heard to say:
"Osaw mileg oph," which interpreted,
means that a resident of Milwaukee
had better not go West
1
I
a
of
a
to
go
Condensed from the daily Avalanche:
IA piece nf roch fell and struck Hon. I. Culp
on the forehead, when at work in the Belle
Peek nine, a few day* ago, inflicting a wound
which bled quite freely. The injury will not
incnpacitate him for butineat.
Thieves have become to induit rioui at 8i1
ver that they «teal pick* and crowbars.
They had a crushing of about twenty-four
ton* of Revenue ore at the Cosmos mill, from
which they made a clean-up of $1,500, • day
or two ago. The rock paid $6&50 per too,
and the boys fed pretty good over it
Bernard, the man who was shot rn Rey
nolds creek, recently, it reported worts.
Tk* roads from hare to Winnemuocn am
in good condition with the exception of about
twelve mile« at this end of tbo routa.
The Washington Chronicle
calls marriage notion "news of the
weak.* This reminds ns that on a
relnckj day the Springfield (Mdai.)
Hfitewd with the
mm
*■' !
iipe
mem
A
LL
•ad ad I
*u2» at* aa. si, saia
T HE OOmÄHI^HEl^:
IM ImüMONi (rêw
2f mSTSm th. «». "d w ,SH^VamSL**
ua^é.1
WoUo».
ALL PERSONS HOLDING CER
A. tela TT»« 11 proniMory notes iasoed by mo to
niU Crook. Boise Oa.1* "
h to »top their eireukHoo. Alxx. Dam«».
IDAHO BAKERY,
If« 1 « BL, Idaho City, aacoad door below Iimmal*#
jewelry atore,
BREAD. PIES, CASES, CRACEEBSOP ALL KIRDR.
CONPECTIONEKT,
CIGAR» AND TOBArCt
Soda Water. and fruits. dried aad fresh*
always on hand, ice cream darin* the Somme
month*.
Ordere for belle aad partie# promptly tiled.
HENRY PRE1D R.
0
LD TYPE METAL. FOR SALE AT
thle ofice. Good for all the purpose* for which
n^biti Meta i* ueed. aad ta «w •
Mette*.
T O M. S. PARKER. F. W. K RÜBER
and O. W. i 'reite, end alt who« It may mwhb:
Y«u end earh at you. are hereby LotiSed (Ml L tl.
W. I rene. have done the fall amount of work ra
qui red by the lee of Ctougrem of ISTt, m4 im d
mriiU thereto, to wii :
One If «end red nnd Et* ht y (IBM) Deller«
worth ou th# -Amène«» Sur Quam L«dg«, Sra*
restera esteadoa daim, eoaeietmg of ai kwdrd
<6U0 î foot, stunted la Banner l»telnet. Bon# ooaniy
tdabo Territory, sod yoa are hervby repaired to pay
u» me. sll s* «weinet» u again* you oa Un mon. sud
for the publication of this advertisement. with»
mart y r*oi day# from the date hereof or forfait all of
your rieht, Utk. mterrat sad claim, to. to sod ap>*
*«4 • Atnerumn Star (joaru claim. * aa j rovided for
by the act above «pacified.
O. W. CRAFTS.
iDeaoCrrr. February 11, UTS.-ml.
of
at
his
he
his
stir
one
re
he
and
Per
the
and
es
As
iDeaoCrrr. February 11, UTS.-ml.
T O
tu
C. F. SWARTWOUT, HENRY
Heiden. J. C. Isaacs, lthatnar T Walker. Sylvan»
1 er Allen. Thoa. Mootry. Jr , M C Riwa, Albert
I Tarte. Cbariee Albright. Alphonse Cbeppine, and all
»«reby given that
end espMkdod
whom it may concern Notice ta here
L Thotnaa Mootry. Jr., have done work
the eu ta of
Owe Hand red (|MO| and Slat jr Dallam
on the Ixtoe Star mine, in the Placer Mining DiaMet,
tn the County of Hoiae. Territory of Idaho, nod that
you have failed to contribute the amount emo am
your respective l nie resta in aatd mine, sod If the
«am# shall not have beeo paid within Ninety (90)
day# iron* the date hereof your said int er e sts in aald
mine will be forfeited by operaikm of Law.
THUS. MOOTRY. Jau
QttAurtncao, Jaa. L IS"A
not
8i1
day
am
the
a
T O Fdward Webs, W. Townsend
C. O. Kiagefoy. O. D Oagwin. DaoL Me Laugh
litt. A. a. Langdne. C. B Watt#, p. Edward Coaaor
Heben E. livid. Elia* Brown, aad O. K. Ha vag«, awd
•II whom it may concern : Tea, and each of yon. arw
hereby ncufled that L C, 8. KlngsWy. have donu the
foil amount of work required by the law of fimgriee
of HCl and amendments thereto, to-wit:
Fewr Hand red n«d EftgUlyjlMI) Mian
worth on the "General Coenor** quarts laden, diucev.
«ry claim, »ituated in the Silver Mountain District,
Territory of Idaho, orné yea am here by
required to pey to me all eeeeeeaMMs egatnel you on
the et me aad for the publication of this edver
ueem rtti.w ithin ninety (fan <Hye itam the dale hem.
of. or forfeit all yoar rtaht, utle, inlsreat aa
1«. to, end upon, said "General Connor*
claim, aaprovuted for by tha act above
Inano Cttt, Jen. *0,1«:*.
ion nor" mutt
•oveepactned.
O. ft K tonal, ,av.
Motte«.
T°* w f. p*t«.
iS«ltyno«ined that L O. W.olfCham
One 11 nndred ni
Ä are hereby required to pay to meaUanaMMM
you on the---
ï
work required by the law of
mendmenta th er eto , tmertt:
**«hty (1SS) Mleiv
m
vvrtleemeot. wlthtn ninety
-wreof or torihlt all of yonr right. >|tU
tha
» W. CRAFTS.
- L " T AOI NjO. d . CAO win,
peM*
3. If wksft i w neglect tr
•ÄnBCfet
tmo until they ktv« MttleTtL
Uni then diseontinoed. **
4. If wbterihert remove ia
without informing the pubtiah*
paper* are sent to the former '
•re Mi reapuoaible.
5. The eourte have faifad
take newspaper* from the
red leaving then Kneaded far a'* 1
evidence of intentional fraud. 1
6. The poet matter who dmU*,.
legal notice of the neglect of*
fron the office the newsaaimV 1111
hin, in liable to the publisberfer i
tire price.
WAGON ANDCARPERTn
■tlatoMt.Uak.Cii,,
E JONES, proprietor.
Make* a speciality of repaint,,
ona, buggies, Ac. None but ü»
BE 8 T SEASONED TIHBES 1
and wort warranted equal to my ft (In ,
(live wie a triaL
PIANOS, ORGANS,
SHERMAN A
Wholesale and Retail
Music Dealei
Oor. Raaray and Setter Sh,
SAN FRANCISCO.
And are now need to Canonn
by all of oar
GBEAT ARTJ
TOE SHERMAN A HYDS
1« the only
FIRST CLASS INSTROU
Sold at
The Square Ptanoe ere TS oedamm^j
M od em i m pr o ve m en t s, euch ee wpr
Cam. Bmnuful Mont di ng*. Fell Ir oa ny .
Legs and Lyre. Omrotrung Bee*. ***•■
Length.• foallOtncnee; Wldth.SM«i
AM FULLY fi
For Ton Years
AOENT8 FOR
THE STANDARDORt
which, for
* f 22*SS
I8UNEIVAÜ
We keep constantly on hand a r»* 1
acuaBLC ohcav rw
TK (Mm
FULLY WAMAITÖ
PIANOS
mm*#

xml | txt