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Mountain Home bulletin. (Mountain Home, Idaho) 1888-1889, July 28, 1888, Image 1

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MOUNTAIN HOME. IDAHO. SATURDAY, JULY 28, 1888.
VOL. I.
NO. 9.
GEO. M. PAYNE Prop.
FAITH'S VISTA.
When from the vault in! wonder of the sky
The curtain of the light is drawn aside.
And I behold the stars in «ill their wide
Significance and glorious mystery,
Assured that those more distant orbs are suns
Round which innumerable worlds revolve,—
My faith grows strong, my day lx>ru doubts dis»
solve.
And death, that dread annulment which life shuns,
Or fain would shun, becomes to life the way.
The thoroughfare to greater worlds on high.
The bridge from stur to star. Seek how we may.
There is no other road across the sky;
And, looking up, I hear star voices say:
could not reach us if you did not die."
—Henry Abbey lu American Magazine.
!
"Y
Circus Man Ilefore King ITmbandlnl.
It is not often that circus "artistes" find
their way into the realms of n South African
chief; but when they do it would seem that
their reception is likely to lie very enthusias
tic. A "strong man" from a Cape Town cir
cus, recently journeyed to the far off regions
of Ama Swaziland, and there gave a display
of his skill and power before Chief Uinban
dini at his "great place." So pleased was
Uinbnndini at the performance that lie forth
with dictated a testimonial gratis. Here it
is: "We gladly certify that you bave per
formed at our Royal Kraal, Swaziland, on
rings, poles, chairs and sticks; that you have
also played with an iron tree*, and also car
ried a largo cannon on your back, and fired
it off your back in our presence. We were
astonished and gratified at the wonderful acts
that you and your little son performed. We
do not believe that you will ever die. Given
at our Royal Kraal this 0th day of Dec-em
ber, 1887. Umbandini (his 4 mark), King
of Swaziland."—St. James' Gazette.
A Gypsy Rand from Russia.
One result of Lord Randolph's visit to Rus
sia, may be the advent in this country of the
famous gypsy band which is known by the
namo of its leader and conductor, Nikolai
Shishkin. This Bohemian band has long lieen
one of the chief musical sensations of the St.
Petersburg season, and Lord Randolph had j
several chances of hearing it play during his
visit. Ho first heard it at the Fiench ambas
sador's ball, ami was so struck by the unique
character of both jierformers and music that
bis curiosity was aroused. He sought and
gained an introduction to Nikolai Shishkin
himself, and took subsequently the greatest
interest in him and his band. The most curi
!
I
ous feature of this gypsy band is the presence
in it of a number of female gypsies, some of
whom are typical beauties. The more hand
some of these musical gypsy damsels make ;
excellent marriages.—London Figaro.
Rushing Through College.
But we cannot afford to imitate England 1
in the matter of education. We hnv
leisure class. Everybody works. And boys j
rush through school and the higher schools—
which we, by courtesy, call c«»lieges—to
plunge into invoice books, to make briefs of
titles, to gulp down as much law as they can
before beginning the practice of what they
will learn by their experience and that of
their clients'. As to the law—which ought
to be a learned profession—a long ani sound
preparation in tho classics is almost a lieces
sity. Few young Inwtn, and few young
doctora lmve the time for it. Hut for the
aspirants for success in the various forms of
business one or two modern languages arc
absolutely necessary.—New York Freeman's
Journal.
! leader
Journal.
Autograph Fiend*.
Young ladies with a passion for autographs I
will not relish the arrangement which a !
number of the poets and authors and orher I
celebrities of this and other countries have
adopted of using a typewriter for all corre- !
spoil den ee, except in the most important and j
private letters. A la«ly who lately wrote an
ingenious note to th«« poet Tennyson, asking
an expression of opinion on a matter that j t
could not fail to command his attunlion,
was tleeply chagrined to receive an answer
wholly typewritten, including the signa
ture. If this is to be kept up it is quite clear
that the autograph hunter's occupation is
gone.—Philadelphia Times.
Hard
H«»r*eiil»oes for Had Roads.
The Germans have invented horseshoes for ;
bad roads. This is how they do it. The
blacksmith, when finishing a horse's sluje, !
punches a hole m tho two ends. When the
shoe is cold ho taps in a screw thread and I
screws into the shoe, when«., the is .rse's foot, j
a sharp pointed stud of an inch in length. I ™
With shoes thus fitted the horse travels se- > "' h
curdy over tho worst possible roads. When »>
tho hoi-se comes to the stable the groom an- •
screws the pointed stud a„d screws in a but- ;
ton, so that no damage can imp,*., to tll9 ;
, , A1 , , . . • i
horse, an«l the screw holes are prevented
from filling.—Home Journal.
uiai.
»lg«,
Preservation of F«rr«*t*.
The preservation of forests from the depre
dations of insects and aphides is largely de
pendent upon tho spiders that inhabit them,
more effective work of this kind being per
formed by them than by tho insect-eating
birds. Examinations of the viscera of the
spiders kept in captivity show them to be vo
racious destroyers of these creaturars, onrl as
. ,, , I *
they prefer dark spots in the forests, which
are tbe places most infested by vermin, the | j_j
results of their labor are very beneficial.— ! j
Globe Democrat. j
YTater l'roof Hook Rind ing*. j |.
A composition has been produced which j
may prove valuable to book binders, having j t »
for its purpose tho rendering Water proof of
leather, cloth, paper, etc. Jt is a mixture of j
water, silicate of soda, re&iq, alum, potash; i
fish glue, sulphate of zino and sulphate ibe
copper in various proixirtipu». The applica | t
(ion is said to render the material impervious mr:
to the influence of oil or , water, and, if. a uo
variety of ingredients increase practical
utility, should be very viihiable,*—Chicago t w
Times.
!
|
Market for Red Oak.
A profitable market lias been found for the
poor, despised American • red oak, that lias
been considered of no value at all. Ameri
can dealers are buying up all they can get
hold of and shipping it to Liverpool, lhere,
tlie lumber is manufactured into fancy fur- i
niture and shipped back to New 5 ork, where '
it is sold to wealthy (»copie ns tli© real Lug- j
ball oak, and at pretty stiff prices, too.— Chi
cago Herald.__ !
. . . Tn „ i
„ , ' , v r d!„
Ile-Do you know, Mi,s Mallei, I l ,a '®| (
covert-.l why m> liiam is so uctm'l Kl.» i
No, Mr. Mi,msw.t, what is your theory? * 6 1
It is because I so ^ton sUu't a tram cd !
thought, bhe Ah, yesl lhe Limited. 0
Tid-Bits.
a
Tli« \V«>rUr» Way.
My fricnil, don't forget.this—if you U«
world will go out of its way to
you; but if you stand up and l«»ok
ill give you half the road at least.
down, tho
drive over
severe, it* v
— Uncle Ezt k.
Tho early bird catches the worm, and it ii
tlie curly crocus that catches tlie nipping
frost. Eariincss is occasionally a bad habit
—Pittsburg Bulletin.
A "spotter" that shouhl be stamped out*—
The smallpox.— Doßton CoimneroiaL
WHAT SHALL WE WEAR]
for
has
BUSINESS SUITS, FROCK COAT SUITS
AND DRESS SUITS FOR MEN.
IIow Pet Dogs W'ear Harness when Out
for a Walk—A Pretty Indoor Costume
Which Represents In Its Cut and Gar
niture New Styles.
Tho cut here given illustrates an indoor
costume that represents iu its fashion and its
furniture, leading styles. The skirt of this
! this costume is of heavy brown cashmere,
braided with the same color and trimmed
with a flounce thirteen inches deep, laid iu
boy. pleats.
in
a
N*P~*-*if??
L
ïfll
m
V
ÆÏ
\!
m
m
j
N
S\
^ wJHWr
!
I
1
;\VVr=.
/Âm.
i/l
BRAIDED COSTUME.
For the front drapery arrangement, a
breadth of material one yard and u quarter
wido and ono yard five inches long is pleated
into the band at the upper edge and caught vp
Tho back breadth, which is
! tw,» yards ten inches wido and ono yard six
I inches long, is pleated into the band, tho ma
terial being arranged in a largo box pleat in
the middle and in smaller fiat ones at tho
sides and then caught in the middle.
Waistcoat pieces complete tho fronts of the
bodice, which is further ornamented with
revers two ami three-quarter inch«« long
Largo flat bronze buttons are also used in th**
ornamentation of tho bodice. (Boo cut.) Such
braided ornamentations as hero described
may easily bo made by our readers, or braided
sets may bo purchased for tho purpose.
; on the left si«le.
1
j
of
of
1
, . . .
Tho dog hm» como to I» an important f««
tu™ >" ' ,J " world üf fashion, and what he
shall wear and how to mak * it is therefore a
Harnes* for Dog*.
of .
! qu«*»-on <>f >»<.reor less interest The pet
owned by ladies and sent «nit daily to
walk ar.* commonly led by a leather or chaw
! leader attached to the collai*.
is
ling,
in
us
ity
utes
day.
and
ii.g
! leader attached to the collai*.
I
!
I
!
j
j t
'i'ßiiM
II
kk
\V,
WL
m
<ßf (
r
;
! HARNESS OF IÆATHBR WORK Fon Doas.
, , ... . . , . . , .
I Tbe lmrness here illustrated is not only ia
j *°ndcd/or ornament but also to prevent the
I ™ Uar f™m press,ng n.to the neck of tho dog
> "' h f " is «*>. "•
»> th « urranKcm ont shown, ,s put through s
• ,et , ' ,,,ldk ' °i tho ^'7. ba ' ul 0, n th *
; Jhe harness from which the .dus -
; rat,on ,s taken ™,,s,sts of fou straps, each
• i three-auarters of an men wide and long
^
of
.ng
s
in
as
Tho latter.
enough to reach around tho Ixsly of the am
uiai. .Sometimes light colored leather is used,
sometimes dafk. Occasionally strips of red
doth, somewhat wider anil pinked out at the
»lg«, are stitched on under the leather. The
strips an* joint'd and ornamented with gilt,
silver or nickel headotl nails. These harnesses
eau-bo purchased ready made, though many
todies prefer having them made to onler.
New York Fashions for Men.
I * The following New York styles in men's
were recently described in Harper's
| j_j azar; Business suits are of dark mixed suit
! j nirH an( j c heck» and stripes that are not con
j spteous-indeed, ore almost invisible—pro
ducing dark gray shades, brown and red mix
j |. urc8| black and brown che<*ks, etc. These
j suitl4 may Bave n cutaway coat, fastene«! by
j t » im) or f our buttons, as the size of the
of wcarer dictates, or else a four butte»ne«l sack
of j coat . t | l0 wa i«tcoat may have a "step" rolled
i fetched) collar or a standing "step" collai*;
ibe edges are double stitched. Trousers for
| t besc suits—and iudeeil for all suits—are cut
mr: ji unl w ( ( ( 0 am l ban;? straight, but they are
a uo ^. (i f exaggerated widtli, nor do they havo
folded cfease down the f l'ont and back
t w bi e h belongs to ready mad© clothing. A
silk or satin scarf tied in a large knot, a
! Hack Derby hat au«l tan or mahogany eol
| ored gloves with wide black stitchiug
worn with business suits.
Those dressy morning suits that are worn
the
lias
afternoon as well have a cutaway coat
get veflf . or dark blue corkscrew
^ ^ 0 r of diagonal that is not **'ery witlo,
i ^ ^ Jhe c n.iished cloth,
' rp^ c f 1 - 0< *p : coa t suit is acccptc«l as the cor*
j ^ ^ ^ d rC ss suit for formal receptions in
afternoon and for day weddings, alike
! foi . t j l0 bridegroom, ushers anil quests. Fine
i Mack diagonals, corkscrew cloth or chevi. t
d!„ -a cloth without facing-are used for the
( ,. lu blo breasted fr.Kik coat, which isofmo
i m ul; , lencth, is fastened by four buttons, has
6 1 silk facing, is bound with ribbon
cd ! "aud hnS wifh black satin. Tho vest
0 f tho same cloth is single breasted and mo
dium high. The trousers are of dark stripes,
though slightly lighter trousers are worn by
a bridegroom and his attendants. W hite or
very light ottoman silk scarfs, with a jeweled
scarf pin, and (»carl colored gloves stitched
with iiearl, are worn by the groom, best man
and ushers. The guests also wear light scuns
with ten colored gloves. A bign silk aat*
completes a frock coat suit.
Dress suits for evening are of the finest
black diagonal or Angolas, especially those
for young men ; broadcloth is little used. I n«*
«Ire**» coat is cut with narrow swallow tail
cod low rolled shawl collar in long continu
ous roll, or it may be a notched collai* if the
wearer prefer», j

to
l«»ok
ii
out*—
STRAY BITS.
THE
J P. Irwtik, of Oswego, N. Y., paid $10,000
for a Bible.
One of the business colleges In Cleveland
has a department of phrenology
There are laws against using profane Ian
guage by telephone in all states except Cou
necticufc
A barber at Sues, Art., while shaving a
man was seised with an attack of homicidal
mania and cut his customer's throat front
ear to ear
sion
ber
At Denison, Tex., a belated passenger
emptied his revolver at the truin that bM«i
not waited for him, and was promptly taken
in band by the police.
id to be only one »urvivor of
powerful Indian tribe in California
There is
a once
When bodies the language spoken by Un
tribe will become extinct.
Honesty is sometimes rewarded. A Nev
Orleans lad found a valuable aachel, ami
U|>on taking it to the owner, who had adver
tised the loss, was made happy with a bran«,
new $199 bill.
Professional burglars are going the round'
of the country towns just now. It is then
usual summer begira, and the guardians oi
the peace should be on the watch for such un
welcome visitors.
Less than one-half of the senators now ii
office were born in the states which they rep
resent. Americans seldom emigrate out ot
the country, but they do a great deal of emi
grating about in their own land.
The managers of a western railroad which
is experimenting with natural gas believe
that it may yet prove not only the cheapest
of fuel for the locomotive, but excellent (is
heating as well as lighting the cars.
American authors are more read than tbs
English in Japan. Last year 85,000 English
and 119,000 American books were imported
luto that country, so that the old question.
•Who reads an American book!" was fuirly
answered.
Tho Zilvern Kruis, the AVst Putch man of
war to enter the Golden Qateir. fifteen years
is lying off San Francisco. She I» a training
ship on her way to Japan, China ami tb**
Dutch colouies in India, where she will
a prolonged stay.
Miss Eliza Bliss, of Reboboth, Conn., sup
pliod a tramp w ith a meal. While she was
preparing the food the trump sang "Nearer,
My God, to Thee," and at the same time
stole the ia«iy'a pocket book and $25 from
her bureau drawer.
The uew Inman steamship, the City of New
York, is warranted by her builders to be
unsin kable. That is, one condition laid down
in the contract by the company was that she
should be unsinkable, although she is of iron
and has a capacity of 10,500 tons.
A New England man has beaten the green
goods saw'dust
got ono of their circulars, and in reply asked
for a sample of their goods. They sent him
a genuine $1 bill, and the gentleman of New
England stopped the corresjiondence then
and there.
As a wedding party was driving through
the streets of a Leuusyl vauia town on their
way to the church at which tho ceremony
was to be performed, the carriages drove
over a little girl, killing her immediately
The arrest of the party prevented the mar
riuge, and it has been postponed.
The Smallest circular saw in practical use
is a tiny disc about the size of a British sbil
ling, which is employed for cutting the slits
in gold pens. These saws are about as thick
us ordinary paper, and revolve some four
thousand times |x?r minute. The high veloc
ity keeps them rigid, notwithstanding the
thinness.
ke
a
vp
is
six
ma
in
tho
the
th**
f««
he
a
He
at their own game.
pet
to
Loudon bankers havo for a long time been
seeking to obtain au additional fifteen min
utes of grace to get their checks through the
clearing house after the close <«f business each
day. The clearing house hus finully con
ceded five minutes, and it is said that the
bankers welcome even this as an almost in
estimable boon.
Near North Adams, Blass., two girls of b
and 19 went out after May flowers and lost
their way in the woods. Borne time aftei
dark they stumbled upon a farm house and
aske«l shelter, but were refuse«!, so they were
forced to remain all night iu the woods, and
were found by the searching party at morn
ii.g hail dead from cold, fright and exhaus
Lion.
of
of
2)
A Montana newspaper says that the days
of staging in the hills are rapidy departing.
Steam is fast taking the place of horse and
mute power, and Pullman coaches are crowd
.ng out the sway back stage» of old. The
toted North western Transportation com
»any has beguu to dispose of its plant, and
s preparing to hunt for business on the rap
idly receding frontier.
The five stouos erected to mark "Mason
and Dixons line" between Mai y land and
Pennsylvania have just hod their annual
visitation by commissioners, who report one
in good «xmditiüii, one lost, one broken, one
liBl«»dged by mining operations, and the fifth, j
which bears on one si«le the arms of Peunsyl
vania, on the other those of lx>rd Baltimore,
tiadly damage«! by vandal relic hunters
A cobra bite has been cured. Dr. Richards,
as reported by The India Daily News, was
handling a cobra with the intentiuu of ex
trading some poison, when he was bitten on
the finger. He immediately cut it o|»cu to
the bone above the wound, ami applied per
inangnnate of potash, put ou a ligature and
burned off for advice Another doctor
opened the wound and cauteriztsi it with
nitric acid, and Dr Richards has recovered
CREATION'S LOWER ORDERS.
The pri«le of Kingman county, Kan., is a
bull that weighs 4,250 pounds.
An alligator uest, found In Rice creek.
Fia., contained forty-three young saurions.
According to the naturalists wasps remem
ber the locality of their nests just ninety-six
hours.
There are 40,000 reptiles kept in one room
in the timitbsonian institution at Washing
ton. It *s ueedles* to add they are kept in
alcohol.
A great snowy pelican, that had somehow
got wtiefully astray, was shot the other day
near Albany, Ga. Tho hunter says that "at
first he took it for a calf."
A man in Detroit was saved from a hor
rible death by tho courage of two pet cats,
which cUtfved him awake barely iu time to
escape from a burning building.
The statement is made that no less than six
sfiecies of North American birds have btxxmie
extinct during the last ten year», and it is
claimed that English sparrows were tbe
main cause.
There is a man in Yankeebush, Pa., w ho
has two eggs laid by a Plymouth Rock hen,
one of them measuring 8^ inches long and
.»% inches round, the other 8 inches long aud
<j% inches round.
A Philadelphia drummer astonished the
people of Omaha tbe other day by wearing a
live chameleon as a watch charm. The curi
little lizard was attached to a chain by
a thin band of gold wound about iu neck,
and nestled In the creases of tbs drummer's
waistcoat with every Indication of coûte nt
msnL
ous
MJlhM r. AM) I'KUUKLSS.
A
A
natural
to be
be
the
eu ho
"They
said.
the
ample
"The
"
THE WONDERFUL MAXIM GUN-AN
INTERESTING MAMMAL.
Illustrâtes lu a Pleasing
mu Arrangement of
Floating Magnetic Needles the Mutual
Repulsion of Similar llodles.
Professor A. M. Mayor has devised an ar
rangement of floating magnetic needles which
beautifully demonstrates tho mutual repul
sion of similarly magnetized bodies. A num
ber of strongly magnetized carpet needles are
inserted in small corks, as shown in the pros
pective view of the picture here reproduced.
Professor May«
Manner
With
mala
M
Droit
sucking
mother
usual,
'don't
thumb
ÔÔQA
MAYKU'S FLOATING NEEDLES.
When floating, explains The Scientific
American, these needles arrange themselves
in symmetrical groups, tho form of tho groups
ranging with the number of needles.
One pole of a bur magnet held over the
center of a vessel containing the floating
needles will disperse the needles, while the
other pole will draw them together.
take
when
of
dreuf"
sir;
most
A
school
An Aiiwstlietie Hüllet.
An anaesthetic bullet has been invented by
a German chemist which, it is claimed, will,
if brought into general use, greatly diminish
the horrors of war. The bullet is of a brittle
substance, breaking directly when it comes in
contact with the object at, which it is aimed.
It contains a powerful anaesthetic, producing
instantaneously complete insensibility, last
ing for twelve hours, which, except that the
action of the heart continues, is not to lie dis
tinguished from death. A battle field where
these bullets are used will iu a short time l»e
apparently covered with dea«l bodies, but in
reality merely with the prostrate for
soldiers reduced for the time being to a state
of unconsciousness. While in this condition
they may, the German chemist points out, l»e
puckoJ in ambulance wagons and carried off
os prisoners.
in
of
be
she
him
use
sbil
slits
thick
four
the
been
min
ke
.f
you
day
with
Gun.
The new and really wonderful weapon
christened Maxim gun weighs over sixty-five
pounds, is mounted on a light tripod, which
can be lowere«!, raised, moved literally with
one hand as easily as a garden hose, and
which pours out automatically 000 shots n
minute. There is no crank to turn; there is
labor of feeding. One man simply sets
the bullets going, ami then directs it at will;
aking a whole regiment front if he likes, or
keeping the fire within a range of five feet or
five inches. The basis of it all is the utiliza
tion of the recoil force to fire the next shot.
The Mi
He
tel in the World.
igest T«
It is claimed that the longest completed
tunnel in the world is at Sehenmitz in llun
Ja
gar y It is 10.27 miles in length, with
section of 9 feet 10 inches by 5 feet inches
and is used for drainage purpow«. The new
Croton aquedw't tunnel now iu course of <*x
cavation near this city will l»e much the long
est tunnel in the world. When completed it
will be nearly o0 miles long, with a section
much larger than that of the Sehenmitz tun
nel, being about HI fc«'t in diam3ter. Twenty
two miles have already lieen excuvuted.
cross
is
on
in
«if
A Reuinrkuble Mammal.
The accompanying cut represents tho top
of the skull of the remarkable mammal, Trity
lodon, descrilied by
Henry F. Osborn,
of Princeton, in
Scion%e.
iluced to two-thirds
natural size, the
genus being much
larger than any
other hitherto
known from the
Mesozoic period. In
the interval be
. 1
3
It is re
fa
U
"
tween the parietal»
and frontal» (1 and
2) is seen the pari
etal foramen (8),
which lias exactly tho same position and re la
tions as in the lizard genus Sphenodon.
From the large size of the parietal foramen in
Tritylodon, which greatly exceeds that of any
of the recent lizards in actual diameter, and
compares with that of the labyrintho«louts
und suurians. Professor Osborn infers that the
primitive mammalia, of this family at least,
had a pin«-al eve of some functional siz» and
•ecortled are consid
j
SKULL OF A REMAUK
. AULE MAMMAL.
value. The facts he
ered of remarkable interest to scientists, a«i«l
ing, as they do, to the rapidly accumulating
evidence for the reptilian ancestry of th«»
inanimals.
Why Color» Cannot be Photographed.
Photography has never reproduced natural
colors. Scientists explain this fact by the
statement that color has no objective cxis
It is simply the brain's interpretation
I
j
!
tence.
of the rapidity with which the waves of a ray
of light beat against the retina. Beats more
rapid produce the sensation of the mind
known as violet; ls?ats less rapid, that known
red. Violet and red are nothing but vibra- |
tions of the ether until they reach the optic
and communicate tothat the vibrations
nerve
which the brain translates. To photograph
color is therefore as impossible as to photo
graph sound. _
a
in
to
is
ho
the
a
by
nt
Island.
of
Disappears
According to the official newspaper of the |
Firve islands, the rock island of Munken, 1
»uth of Bumbo, lias sunk out of sight. In a
ord, one of the most striking objects in the '
Furve group, which has been sailed past and j
admired by thousands of people and played j
an important part in geographical liter: tme,
has disappeared. It once stood seventy feet \
above the level of the sea, but the rock ,
gradually crumbled away so that the tide |
washed over its surface. The shallow waters j
around the island formed dangerous currents, 1
with eddies,
dreaded by mariners.
8,
maelstroms, which were much
A House of Straw.
A house constructed entirely of materials j
manufactured of straw is one of the promised
novelties to be exhibited at tlie forthcoming !
American exhibition in London. Said bouse, .
which, according to Iron, is lieing mado in
Pennsylvania, is to represent an American
villa two and a Half stories high, and cover
ing a space of forty-two feet by fifty feet.
Spiders Attracted by lllectrlc Light.
A Washington correspondent comments on
a species of spider that lias appeared smee
tlie introduction of electric lights. It plys its
craft day and night. Everywhere its webs
imparting a dingy, dirty appearance
to the architectural ornamentation outside
and ceilings inside buildings that are iilu
nutnl l.v ..».IrioitV
are
THE YOUNG PEOPLE.
A Youthful »II ml Which Delved lute
Natural ritilo»op)iy.
A young scholar, taking his first lessons to
natural philosophy, had the existence of
animalculæ, the minute creatures, too «mall
to be seen with the uaked eye, which are to
be fouud in liquids, explained to him. After
the lesson he was asked to teil what animal
eu ho were.
"They are animals that you can't see," he
said.
"Weil, that may do for an answer." said
the teacher. "Now. will you give me
ample of auimalculæ#"
"The hippopotamus, the gorilla, the
whale"
"Stop! What makes you think those ani
animalculæ f'
" 'Cause 1 uever suw one of 'eml"—Youth's
Companion.
a
a
A
a
»**
ex
mala
tl
A Ready Answer.
Plaxie is a bright eyed little girl in I«»*
Droit park, and she has the bad habit o'
sucking her thumb. The other morning hei
mother was combing her hair and Plaxie, a>
usual, had her thumb in her mouth.
"Plaxie, Flaxie," reproved her mother
'don't do that What would you do if thaï
thumb should eotne off#"
"Suck th'other one, mamma," replied the
incorrigible, coolly, ami paralyzed her
mother.—Washington Critic.
'<»l»ulnr Opinion.
his ndilress to a Sunday
going to
take a text out of the Bible. I always timl
when 1 preach that the text is the best part
of my sermon. Isn't that so, my deur chil
dreuf" And all thechildren shouted: "Yes.
sir; that's sol" And those enjoyed the joke
most who had heard the preacher uftcuesL—
Religious Herald.
A preacher beg
school thus: "Now, children, 1
«x
l»e
in
l»e
He Knew.
"Mamma," said tho sweet small boy lierore
admiring friends, "I knew as soon as l cume
in there was folks visitin' here."
"Did you, darling?" said the fond mother,
trying to wilt him with her eye; "how did
know'#"
"Oh, you had y
Detroit Free Pres
company voice on."—
.f
Th« Weary lloiirs of Sickness.
Young Victor, who bod been for three
with pneumonia, ask«*! one
rercoat. it was brought out
>nt by his mother.
"Hang it on the foot of the bed, won't yon,
mamma/" he ask««« 1.
"Yes, my boy, if you wish it; but why do
you want to have it out here?"
"Just to look at it. mamma. It's Imh«»
such a long time since I've seen it."— Boston
Transcript.
oeks lying ill
day to see his
with no little won« 1er
n
is
sets
or
or
In tlie Nursery.
Johnnie—Mamma, wasn't Adam tho first
man#
Mother—Yes, and Eve was the first
woman.
Johnnie—Didn't they have any papa and
mamma#
Mother—No, dear.
Johnnie—Was they orphans, mamma?—
Washington Critic.
.
1
A Neat Hit of E«
Not a bad example of
is reported to the Listener by u northern tour
ist, as coining from the pilot of a steamboat
on the Georgia c«
Yank
ambiguous answer
st. Tho tourist, who is a
ddier, was
gaged in an easy conversation with the pilot
in a moment of tho latter's relaxation, and
the pilot to!«l him certai
«if an interesting character, without, how
ever, direetly intimating that ho had any
personal part in them. Bo the Yankee»asked,
point blank :
"Which si«lo were you on during the war?"
Tin* pilot guve him a glane» which seemed
to say, "You are too inquisitive," and then
answered :
"1 was on the other side."
Then he change«! the subject of converse
The northern visitor is Btill spoculafc
to which the "other side"
other side from the questioner's, the other
si«ie from the si«le Georgia w 1
si«lo of th
Canadian bonier.—Boston Transcript.
•as a Union
1
reminiseencei
tioxu
. tbs
ing
on, the other
oean or tlie other si«io of the
Ceding F.i
w
i
m
■//
T
U
?
i'i*4
V
(.
jlPül
He— I see that old Mr Beutly w'
y ester« lay.
Wife (shocked)—Why, is old Mr. Bently
deal#
He (who has just l>wn "sat upon"!—The
paper doesn't say
simply that ho ws
•s
u
buried
I First New Yorker—What? Starved 1°
j death# 1 thought there was plenty of work
! now for all.
Second New Yorker—He was not out of
He had
|
dietber he is dead or not;
buried yesterday. — Life.
Died In Han
!
I » Hat aw ,
g subscriptions for monuments |
ha World ;
!
•kless teamster on th.
into a half a down ditlor
to my certain knowledge* I
drivin' a mighty Hghl j
' it's me own. -Omaha World.
-
gular occupation.
oik.
| "My stars! What at?"
1
a
'
j
j
\
,
|
j
1
"Collectin'
and other patriotic objects."—O
»I a Driver.
F.volntloi
Citizen—I'm surpri?»ed to find that you hav*
■fui driver, Jak«j. You
become such a c
used to be the most
streets. S' ou
ent carriages
Teamster— I'm
wagon now.
For All Sc©«
Countryman ito furniture dealer)—I want
to get a U'd an' a mattress.
Dealer-Yes, sir, spring be«l and spring
, 1 »'pose, sir?
Countryman—No. I want the kind that
be used all tbe year around. - K[xx-h.
j
!
.
in
on
its
ninitr
can
Way.
President-Yes, Mr Knapper, the faculty
hove decided that you have broken the rule«.
but to suspend
Oi
* and there is no course for
you.
Student— H'm. how about susp«m«lizig thl
rules?—New Haven News.
Th« Universal.
Minnie--Papa, what is Volapukf
Papa— Why, it's tbe universal language
Minnie—But who speaka it#
Papa-Nobody —Binghamton Re p u blic a n
a
AT A TEA AUCTION.
! The
HOW THE EXPERTS VALUE THE
STOCK BEFORE IT IS SOLD.
tells
town
of
I rink,
I
cago
same
the
self,
Mjjd
Seen« In a Salesroom—A Visit from Pro
fessional Tea Tastei
Test—The Aroma—-Getting tho Flavor.
Quirt Purchasers.
A Preliminary
A dozen or a score of tea importers may
•nted in the stock of tea which
a firm of auctioneers offer for sale on
a given «lay. Two hundre«! or more different
gra«lesof ten may be in the consignment.
A sample «*hest, half chest, or package of
each grade is sent to the auction room for
inspection and sampling by prospective pur
chasers. These are ranged in tiers alxmt
that their distinctive
names and marks may l»e seen. All these
n«l a «picer lot of hieroglyphics they
are, are reproduced in the catalogue, always
large leaved, anil with plenty of room for
notes alongside the description of each lot of
a I «articular grade of tea. The lot s vary
from a single |ia« kuge or half chest up to
l>erha)>s a hundred packages of thti fragrant
Oriental loaves. The small lots are usually
particularly choice brands of tea, the largo
ones the cheajier and "standanl" grad«*.
The distinctive marks on these chests aside
»** repr
tl
unction r<
mark«
if
at
fr«>m the Chinese figures are either figures or
letters, sometimes standing alone, but offener
iiiare, a triangle, an
ic<l in a «*ircl«\ a
to
iu«*
«»IIipse, or s«»me other geometrical figure, ami
«x i asmiuilly accompanied By an anchor or
some similar figure that is a symbol of no
•tly. Once in their
, the sample chests
ho wish to
hat
knows
«•tie
places in the a
are made readv for customer»
r<
try the teas. And here is where tea auction
s'il«*s differ from other auction sales. A p
chaser may try liefere he buys. To enable |
him to try, big holes, an inch ami a half or
so in diameter, are cut through the chest ami
its wicker
that the tea can easily !
1'he sample packages thus pre- j
pared, «»verything is ready for the sal»*.
PROFESSIONAL TEA TASTERS.
*r. »
did
I.«* reached.
For two «lays lief «ire the sale y
with the big quarto catalogues ami
(»allied by a boy with small tin boxes visit
th« miction rooms ami tak«» samples for test- j
iug. These young men are usually prof ns i
sional tea tasters, and to the «'usual visitor to
an auction room their methods are peculiar,
to say the least. A wisp of the split bamboo,
such as the not work « *t matting t lint, covers
the pa«*kages is made of, is the sampler's
the Uni chests als »nt
ccom
one
out
yon,
do
Imh«»
weapon for attack
him. His catalogue is held in his left hand, i
With the right he thrusts his wisp of bauilxto, 1
to make a sort of hoe, into the !
rouiul hole in the tea chest, ami from the j
•liest hauls a hamlful of the tea on to tin*
l«»ubl«'d HO
. . . * h i
■utnloguo {tagen. lhe eye serves to tell him
if the tea has been colored or bleached. That j
....... . ,
point n«*ttled, the in»cessary note is made m 1
, ..
i is catalogua 1 hen comes the preliminary ■
. . . ... .
«•st. Ihe tea is (lumped from the sami>l»Ts
. . . . , .... .1 .1
catalogue into his han«l. 1 lien, with the
haml partially cloaed, the sampl«»r blows
vigorously into the mass of leaves, and at
*e applies the leaves to his nose. Tims lie j
g«»ts a fair him of the aroma. As he has no i
that |>articular aamplp, he '
throws it into a trough wind, stands at ihr
f,,„t Of thr rows of diasts, and whi.-h is put ;
th.av for the express pur,sm.of holding tl.es.
d-seard-xl samples and the pi .'tides that do
n-.t fall mi the eatalognepajre» when the wisp
pulls th. sa, ..pie' from the ehest.
. , .. 1 , .. . .. ,,
And so the sampler g«H»M the round <*t t.lie
<»t tea chests, eyeing ami smelling,
, . . 1 » »■ . , . ..
and once in a groat while tasting a bit ot the
, . h
tea. ainl always throwing away two or three
• , ■ .. „ . - J ... •
tMHinds «luring Hie course of his afternoon in
1
first
first
and
further use 1«
tour
>f ham!
is a
pilot
and
long r
j
. . .. _ ,
^ h
si of, and the sampler marks-m h.s rata
of the particular brand of I
!
I
, , . , , , . . , , 1 ,
tin I.OX, which IS duly marked and in'-ksl
witi. tho Bame hieroglyphics that aie m
scribed on the chert and ... the catalogue. A
pies may l»e taken in this way for
the exiHjrt's use outsnle of the auction mom. j
These collected, his work among the sample j
chests is ended.
qjection.
All the observations of this expert as to
»»lor, aroma ami quality are n«»te«l iu his
•atulogue. Home
pl<*8
loguethe vul
tea he hus inspected. But there
brands,
puzzle him.
value of the leaven he has look«xi at and I
smelted of a half dozen times |M*rha|>s. So |
he instructs a youth wlioaccoinjiaiiio« him b>
"take a sample." This youngster, using the
his companion has liefore him, j
nine
sutilly of the finer griutes, that 1
He is in doubt as to the actual !
!
same means
hauls a liberal sample fr«»m the ch«3st into a
1 «»;

;
j
1
GETTING THE FULL FLAVOR.
Accompanied by the b »y ami his s nail
tin boxes, the ex(*«'rt leaves the auction room
to iiis office to finish iiis valuation
Seated at
its stnmlttr«l
Slid gi
of tlu* samples iiis boy carries,
a round table, which turns
at the slightest touch, he flnisl.es Iiis
with a speed which i
rork
little less than mar
id a
French china cups
rn, <»f hot water help him to
the sample tiu box««
A doze
velous.
samovar,
fi
ll*» this.
an* put in the china cups and treateii to a
)Mttli of the boiling water from the urn in
the center of the table,
nary sniff at the ar
particular cup, and then a taste—just a sip—
to g«»t the flavor fully. This tost settles the
<»f the tea in a tin
There is a preliml
arising from
•h
lit, and the ex
valuati«
pert marks in his catalogue w hat he deems j
the samples thus treabsl to b«> worth. N«>
.»tie ever disputes that valuation, for th«* te
taster is in his line an autocrat, a «l«*spot ,
decision no ono «lares question,
catalogue now marked is sent to the buyer I
of tiie house the expert represent», ami w ith
the latter there remains
1° l :ii»|.|iani««l work of attending tho sale and
| M1 ying, if he «-an, at or ls*l<»w the ligures
ii\«-i by the expert at the maximum value of I
of
The ,
h*
;
ilV
iy t»
I
! The uu-'tinn sale itself is very lik» any I
, , thl . r trade sale. A lmn*lre.l men sit altout I
| tV r(Xlnl m fr , ml of the glib tongue*! :
; . , r ( utal „„„ e all(i j„ hand, the
nv,l of buyers ar.' a very .piiel party, ami I
! let tho auctioneer make all the noise. A
catalogue raiscl iu the air for an;
I ist ant g*«s for it bid. 8o.neUu.es a pal of !
th. tlie ie-ad suffices to settle tho ownership of a
onsigmnent of ten. It is very rarely that a
I word is spoken, ex -ent » hen tho rtartiug bid
j u llm ae. When other spoken lads follow they
a , p usua ll v made by some out of town buyer,
The auctioneer knows everybody ... the ;
room except these same out of tow, n. -r
chant», Who ar. looking for bargains. Ko he ,
i.uictly tells hi» clerks the name of the pur- |
•baser and a strange visiting the sale is left
mystery m.rt of the time, not only as to
who the buyer Is, but also as to which one of
the men In that very quiet but very business
like crowd made the bid. Five thousand or
Ii n,K. packages of tea mav be disiHised of in
hour or an hour and a half, ami then the
crowd of buyers melt away just as quickly
it had assembled itself for the sale.—New
: «• tea
pencil
as
York Time».
thl
To 1>« Bom« In Mind.
Minister's Wife (to husband)—Will you
put up the parlor stove today, dear#
Minister (vexatiously)—I suppose I will
n
have to.
Wife—And don't forgot, John, that you
are a minister of the gospel.—Harper*! Bint
HE WAS ADMITTED.
! The Future Mi
Got In anil the Show
Proceeded.
Will J Dnvi». of the Haymarket theater,
tells of a night of minstrelsy in a California
town in Petaluma valley He was manager
of the show, winch was given in a skating
I rink, opjxwite a corn Held. The average
I Californian wan not unlike the average Chi
cago theater goer between acta. He hod the
same thirst, the only difference being that
the Californian had further to go for his
elixir Mr Davis, knowing something of th#
character of the Californian carrying his
point, had ashed the city marshal of the
town to occupy a seat with biin in the box
office. The rush out between acts had re
fetrued, and Mr Davis was preparing to
tount up. A typical miner presented him
self, whittling with a knife, the blade of
which was six inches long. "You know tnef
Mjjd the Californian.
Mr. Davis su|id ho hadn't the honor.
ud went out," the Californian
remarked, tur ling o!f another shaving.
Mr. Davis asked him for his check.
"You didn't give me no ctieck," said the
with the knife.
to
•d m," remarked the Chicago
"Beg your |
, who begin to feel that he was a long
home.
way fr
"I'm goin' tji," said the Californian, "and
I'll take this here knife
if you try to stop
and lay your liver out where the crows'll pick
at it. D ye understand, you hatched faced,
long eared curiosity from the east?"
Mr. Davis i tidged the town marshal, who
got up ami looked out «>f the window. "Is
that you. Bill?" lie asked of the Californian.
"Yes, it's ii e, and 1 ain't got no check."
undi ii turned to Mr. Davis and
or
an
or
no
to
The Mw
»aid: "Well,
no cheek you
fir the show
if Bill says you didn't give him
didn't. And 1 reckon it's best
|
or thei
ami iul«»st sh«
!»*t him go in."
id put his feet on the
ho sat in fr«mt of him, but
Ami Bill
nt i
•k «>f
disturb:»
"it was the peace
said Mr. Davis. "I
after that and (
1
ever gave,
nvn some ti
! wa s iu that I
pre- j heal'd that U Ii had been elected mayor."—
•»hicugo Tin,«.
visit
test- j
ns i
to
»nt
F.i
I rarement As It Is.
*9
*
u

.1
V
BJSLd/i
i
1 _ •
the !
the j
tin*
iJ/i
Patient Do you think it la anything seri
him . J J 0
That j ou !L', 1 v . . . .. . . . . ^ ,
Physician -Nothing but a slight lesion in
m 1 , e P , ...
the muscles of vour back, lake that n«Kii
■ , ,,
cine ami you II be nil right to-morrow.
. ; ,.». , .. ,,
.1 Patient—iV hat makes you walk so funny,
the fi OC (
blows i'hvsician
at W c*eks —J*u« r e
lie j ' "
I've had a ba«'kacho for three
... .
^
11 *** '> f meane,t
neighbors a fdh.w evw ha. sa.d n man y«j
Ul « llulf Joze " l'>ungo rs; 'theyJre
l '<" »"« i»rt.
< ' ,llar «<"'d. every day or two fora cupof
wl f h t^n y the
very wst.—nid then returns, in place of it, a
i . . . . xv .* 1 . . .
mo.tt inferior artel». Were going to head
, .. i .1
'«*in off on that, though; they
, . . ", . . ,
now, and uhen tcey fetch it home, wife's
. ' . .. J . . .. . ,
! going to R»t. it away and loan it to 'em
i *> . h „, J
j again !
faction.
"Well, s r," continued another, after a
, pause, "my wife lias a worse neighbor thau
that. She moved into ouy ueighborbocxl
ago, and in afew day»bor
I u ,.„ |)of ," Kar . vVben she returned
it, it wasn't nearly so fuiL After two or
three such experiont*es, my wife set the cup
away, and when site returned for another
! loan, sent back the same quantity. It was
I still lighter when it was returned, and after
puHsing back and forth, my wife
hawled it out at last with less than a spoon
ful in it."
"How much was in It when the woman
^ jt homi , r que ,. ipd a li9tellor
-Sot a s nglo grain!—they hod washed tba
cupr _ Dt , l roit KreKH Presa
1
j
j
us a cup
lhe chuckled with infinite satia
I
|
j
1
!
! two weeks
The Placo to Tratte.
Stranger (to tailor)—You've got a nice
• stock of goods here.
; Tailor (rubbing his hands)—There'» nothing
like it this si«ie of the Atlantic ocean, sir.
étranger —I've l>een told that your pricea
art» about right, too.
Tailor—Yes, sir; the price I put on a suit
of clothes is a great injustice to my wife and
family. Now, there is a Hue of spring and
summer g »o«ls of my own importation, aud
I paid cabin (»assage rates to get 'em here.
That diagonal, the manufacturer assures me,
mad) exclusively for the lYinco of
Wales, an 1 only got into my lot by mistake.
He offered me big money to get the goods
tack for f»ar of international complications.
Ktranger— You don't say so!
Tailor—Yes, sir. But I laughed at him.
j Y.Tien l g«*t hold of a good thing it goes to a
1 customer »very time if 1 lose money on it. I
will want a nice, stylish spring
hen something for warm weather#
Btraugtjr— N-no. 1 guess not this mom
ng. I was trying to get out of the way of a
on too suddenly a few moments
ago, uini 1 want to get a suspender button
sewed on.—New York Sun.
j ~
, .
I
I
,
; milk wag
Wasn't r»«<I to It.
A traveller was eating supper in the stuffy
saloon of a Chesapeake bay steamboat, and
I w «* eu Lo h;ul liulsht ' d ,llu niea *- ,he waiter
I brought n linger U.wi. with that extra touoh
: of colore* politeness which preceded tho e*.
P«'ted fen The goert moistened bu* Angers
I >'[* from tho bowl, ami then a look of
surprise overspread h;s fa
an; that, he asked. ''" tel '
! «ne." "V\ ater, sah." "I tell you Its kero
a **"«. said the guest augril) , a* the fume« of
a coal oil a.-ose from ills mustache aud flngera
" w >>at do you take me fori Do you think
my musUtche is a lamp w ok, Maybe you
tbjnk want to be a torch light proc««.onl-
; "f»h* 'lake th.s stuff away 1 teü you, ■
thundered the o.l covered tourist. The tor
, ''■««l ''-r obeyed, and a n,ornent taUu- re
| appeared with another bowl u,d teu
blmgly: *1 reckon you was right, uk I
to *«°ne guvs you the bowl what the lamps drip
of lu * sal '- -1 he Argonaut,
. .
or ftomelhlng for Him to Ponder Oxer.
in ; lib* Blunt-fm told that you have made
' up your mind to remain a bachelor all your
life, Mr. K nobel, ewer.
j Mr K.-l-aw beg your paw,Ion, Hith
! Blunt, 1 u«* vali a «tho wised such a state
ment.
"What is
"It's kero
Miss P.—Then I must have beau misin
formed.
Mr. K.—Who-aw-told you thof
Mis» P. — 1 wasn't told in exactly those
words, but 1 was told that you had expressed
a detenu nation never to marry any girl who
knew moire thau yourself. -Boston Courkr,

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