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The Nezperce herald. (Nezperce, Idaho) 1900-1957, January 23, 1919, Image 2

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THE NEZPERCE HERALD
Official Paper of Lewis County
Thursday, January 23, 1919
W. P. Conger & P. W. Mitchell
Editors and Owners
Entered at the Nestperce, Idaho, Post
office as Second-Class Mail Matter.
LS
MAINTAIN THE RECORD.
The circumstances under which the
United States was founded made her a
thrifty nation. In the earlier days,
before manufactories w-ere established,
hold needed had to be drawn from its
This made the Amer
and very carefully
ow r n resources,
icans far-seeing
provident.
As time went on and the nation real
ized itself master of almost limitless
natural resources, its earlier careful
habits dropped away, and a new- liber
ality of living took their place. Peo
ple gained the idea that there was no
object in stinting in any direction, for
there would always be enough. Wher
ever Americans traveled they gained
the reputation of being the most care
less and extravagant people upon the
face of the earth.
The war has pulled us up short. It
has made us feel that there is some
thing far greater than our own require
ments and desires. We now realize
that it is worth while to sacrifice les
ser things for the sake of greater ones.
And the nation has returned much near
er to the economy of its earlier days.
We have had lessons in carefulness
and temperance in all things and in
thrift. It will bo an opportunity thrown
away if we allow these lessons to be
lost, upon us.
We w'ill gain as a nation if we make
the excellent habits of care and thrift
part of our lives.
LET THEIR EDUCATION BE ALL
AMERICANIZED.
The war revealed to us many of the
existing conditions in, the United
States. It showed us that among our
young citizens of draft age a very
large proportion, through illness or
physical imperfection, were unable to
meet the requirements necessary for
military duty. It also brought into
view an illiteracy greatly exceeding
our realization. Among men of draft
age there were 700,000 illiterates.
Such a condition is most unfortun
ate. Our country, in spite of the vaunt
ed advantages of education which it is
supposed to give, is not doing its duty
along educational lines, and along the
linos of preparing men for citizenship.
Besides this large number of illiter
ates, there are many people in this
country who, though they read and
write some foreign tongue, do not read
or write English.
These people are also seriously handi
capped. English, the language of this
country, must be understood if Ameri
cans are to have a common view point
of policies and ideals. It is in com
munities where little English is used
that foreign propaganda, finds its read
iest field.
The United States must look to the
education of her children and the
Americanization of her citizenship.
THE SOLDIERS' SERVICE MARKS.
As the soldiers come back it will be
interesting to distinguish the meaning
of the various chevrons which they
wear upon their sleeves. Here is a list:
A single red chevron signifies "dis
charged with honor.'
A single blue chevron signifies less
than six months' service abroad.
A single gold chevron for each wound
received in service is worn on the fore
arm of the right sleeve.
A single gold chevron for each com
plete six months' service abroad is
worn on the forearm of the left sleeve.
A single white chevron for each com
plete six months' service in the United
►States is worn on the forearm of the j
left sleeve.
There is generally a mere question !
of opportunity, not of willingness or |
ability, between these service marks. !
Often the man who would gladly have
served abroad has been retained in this
country simply because he has shown
superior ability and, therefore, was bet
ter qualified to instruct others. The;
man who displays any one of the chev
rons above described has done his full
duty by his country and is worthy of
high honor.
The selfish ambition of an unprin
cipled ruler has made itself felt from ,
one end of the world to the other, and
has produced results far beyond any
intention or expectation. For instance,
Dr. Robertson, the head of the Chica
go health department, estimates that of
the 400,000 deaths from influenza and
pneumonia in this country, one-half
could have been prevented if the suf
ferers had had skilled nursing,
it was impossible to supply, for the
army had required 20,000 trained nurs
es to meet its needs. This loft at home
barely enough experienced nurses for
ordinary times, and when the epidemic
arrived the scarcity of nurses was im
mediately felt. The people who died
on account of insufficient care in their
sickness were as truly victims of the
Prussian military system as if they had
died on the field of battle.
This
It is a good idea to keep up the eat
ing of food not entirely made from
wheat throughout the country. The
whole grains are best in the long run,
and the habit of seeing everything
white in cakes, bread,etc., is some
thing that will benefit our stomachs
the sooner it is overcome. Barley and
rye are good for a greater purpose than
that for which they have been used
most abundantly—liquors. They are
good to eat with our meals not in the
degenerate state, but in the whole,
nourishing state where all that is orig
inally found in the kernel is there.
Furthermore, when the north and
through
Idaho it will not be placed to suit the
whim of a state highway engineer or
commission, but it will conform to the
lines the people specify. That's anoth
er illustration of the difference in the
public service meted out to each end
of our state.
SURPRISED.
Saturday night, Jan. 11, about 9:30
o 'clock, while the Odd Fellows were at
work, the Rebekahs made a raid and
almost gained admittance. About this
'time the outside guardian, Alva Mitch
ell, made his appearance and was so
much excited and frightened that his
eyes grew as large as saucers. He«had
never seen Rebekahs in raiders' uni
form before. Mr. Farmer, the inside
guardian, nearly broke his neck to
reach the inside door to keep the sup
posed German raiders out.
The surprise was complete, and they
will not want the Rebekahs to make a
raid soon again, as it will take them
some time to get over their fright. It
looks like our city marshal and coun
ty sheriff need assistance.
However, the raiders were armed
with a bountiful supper, to which all
did ample justice and an enjoyable
time was had. By a Rebekah.
Notice To Rebekahs.
The Rebekah Social Club mot at the
home of Mrs. Grace Price Jan. 10, 1919.
The afternoon was spent in a social
way, and Mrs. Price served a nice
lunch, after partaking of which the
Club adjourned.
The next meeting will be held at 2
o'clock Friday afternoon, Jan. 24, with
Mrs. Pearl Heston; Mrs. Maud Dun
ham, hostess. All Rebekahs are urged
to be present.
Mrs. S. R. Walker, See'y.
Attention, Stockmen and Ranchers.
Good young stock is being sold at
estray sales. Watch the advertisement
of estray sales . Talk to your neighbors
about it. When an animal is sold at
an estray sale the original owner loses
all title to the same. Estrays often on
ly bring the costs against them. In I
those cases the original owner has no
chance whatever of recovery.
A. W. Mitchell,
Sheriff of Lewis County, Idaho.
WHY SELL
:> *
I'LL GIVE
YOU *15.°o
EXTRA LARGE
COYOTES FOR
$I5SS*WHEN
ft
&
m
•ey
ft
m
I
SHUBERfis Paying
Y For more than thirty-five years SHUBERT
' has been giving Fur Shippers an honest and
liberal assortment—paying the highest market
prices—sending returns out promptly— render
"better service"—"quicker."
LiW
CW 19 .AJ 3 .S., I ne.
i ytfi
LSI
ing
SHUBERT" Wants Idaho Furs—Ail Yon Gan Ship
ifi
A ''SHUBERT TAG ENVELOPE" on your shipment means "more money" for
your Furs —"quicker"—"the best and promptest SERVICE in the world.
GET A SHIPMENT OFF TODAY
The««
quotation« "
for immédiat«
•bipucat.
N93
N?2
N? I, SMALL
extra to average
NHMEDiur:
N?l, LARGE
EXTRA TO AVERAGE
N? I,EXTRA LARGE
AS TO SIZE 0 QUALITY
AS TO SIZE B QUALITY
EXTRA TO AVERAGE
EXTRA TO AVERAGE
3.00to 2.00
lOOto lie
10.00 to 6.00
lO.OOto 8.09
15.00 to 1100
HEAVy
FURRED,CASED
OPEN AND
HEADLESS
23.00to 17.00
2S.C0to23.C0
COM
8.00 to 4.00
8.09IO 6.00
12.00to 10.00
IG.OOto 14.00
22.00tol8.00
50ta .49
1.00 to .75
1.101» JO
1.60 to 1.39
225 to 1.75
3.00to 150
WINTER
MUSKRAT
I
.35(o 25
.85to .60
LOOto .80
1.50to 1.20
FALL
1.80 to 1.60
2.39to 1.90
SHU* YOUR FORS DIR E CT TO
A. BS • 9 ri- D El ■ • /A/C.
THE LARGEST HOUSE IN THE WOULD DEALING EXCLUSIVELY IN
AMERICAN RAW FURS
H 15-27.W. Aus tin Av». Dept. 473 Chicago. U.S.A. M
HERALDS
Items not intended to hit or
miss anyone in particular, but
just to remind you
That the school kiddies were out
playing ball Saturday.
That it takes live ones to make a
live town. How are you classifying?
That it has been discovered there
are still hens which lay full-sized eggs.
That even the hen is feeling spring
like and becoming more liberal with
her eggs.
That the kaiser and the crown prince
are beginning to realize what it is" to
be "in Dutch.''
That the best man will always win,
and all the bolshevikis that ever hap
pened can Rechange this law.
That at present corn is said to be go
ing down, and it will be some time at
that before a new crop is coming up.
That may be the people of a com
munity ought to have some sayso about
the location of a highway they are pay
ing for.
That the people in Germany seem at
the present time to be divided be
tween Sparta-eusses and Germani
cusses.
That in addressing a letter to an old
friend here, Capt. Chan. AVallace puts
it, "Nezperce, Idaho, Care of God's
' '
That the movie people are trying to
get even with the legitimate drama.
They refer to it by the irreverent ti
tle of "the speakies.''
That the public has a sort of hunch
that the fellow who doesn't advertise
his wares is trying to palm off some
thing he's ashamed of.
That when the I. W. W's. and bol
shevists figure they can make I. W.
W's. and bolshevists of American sol
diers they are making a poor guess.
That the boys over on the north and
south highway who are being asked to
put up the big, long price arc begin
ning to look the critter in the mouth.
That it is a long ago demonstrated
fact that the concern which won't ad
vertise in its community newspaper
will not spend much time boosting that
com in unity.
That among the divorces which are
said to threaten the home life of Amer
ica, there is none more serious than the
divorce between the dollar and its pur
chasing power.
That it has come to be a striking cir
cumstance that the feminine portion of
the local public school faculty finds a
matrimonial knot at the end of a year
or so 's work here.
That if the government continues to
run the railroads for five years longer,
it is to be hoped that at the end of that
time the railroads will be helping to
run the government.
That Uncle Sam 's troubles in the
peace conference are not concerned
with boundaries and indemnities. He
only wants to get his boys home and
to "live happy ever after.''
That now it is reported Trotzky has
put his associate Lenine in prison. The
Twelve Years of Success and Satisfaction Prove that Our Members
are Getting Their
....Insurance at Oost
• • • •
and that the cost is lower than other insurance.
Ask Fred Riggers, Local Director, Nezperce, Ida.
or Write Jesse Hoffman, Sec.-Treas., Leland, Ida.
Nezperce Farmers County Mutual Fire Ins. Co.
saying of French revolutionary times
applies now to Russia—"The revolu
tion is devouring its own children."
That if this state highway building
be juggled around so South Idaho
get the usual lion's share of ev
ery appropriation of state and govern
ment money of course the north end
should not complain. What's the use?
can
can
TO GIVE PLAY AT HARBKE.
"The Ranchman,'' a melodrama; in ;
four acts, will be presented at the
Harbke school house by the pupils on |
The admis - 1
Saturday night, Jan.
will be only 35
is looked for. Don't miss it. The cast
jso,
cents, and a full house
is as follows:
Jim Buckley, foreman of Weston's
ranch, John Sehlader.
Ben Caruthers, a wild blade, Allen
►Scott.
a ranchman, Arthur
Bryce Weston,
Scott.
Archie Stevens, a breath from the
cast, Carl Erb.
Longshot Burt,
sheriff of Coyote
county, Earl Macklin.
Shorty Stubbs, Caruther's foreman,
Dick Walker.
Biff Walker, one of Caruthers' cow
boys, Henry Brown.
Ned Sykes, an Elkville storekeeper,
Henry Sehlader.
Pete, a gentleman of color, Charlie
Shockley.
Mary Weston,
Rose Sehlader.
daughter of Bryce.
Nan James, her
Hanratty.
Mrs. Stevens, of New' York, Kate
Sehlader.
Jennie Law-rence, a ranch girl, Edna
Brow r n.
Place, western Texas.
cousin, Winifred
Time 1885.
BOX SOCIAL.
An old fashioned box social will be
given at the Community church by
the young people 's class and the scout
class of the Sunday school.
A program will be given to which all
are invited—whether you bring or buy
a box; consisting of the High School
Male Quartet, readings, short play,
"Who's a Corvard'' and the famous
negro ministrels. The boxes will be
sold at auction. Old and young are
welcome to bring boxes. •
AT THE ARTIC.
A special at the Artie next Wednes
day night.
Goldwyn program and "O, Doctor!''
Arbuekle comedy Friday.
A new star Sunday—Harold Lock
wood in our first Metro picture.
"The Shooting of Dan MeGrew,'' a !
picture of the frozen Yukon, next Wed- 1
nesday; 20 and 40e.
Barney Krumeich, of Romulus, N. Y.,
who has spent the past six months on
his ranch in the Russell section, will
leave Sunday for his eastern home. He
will be accompanied by Fred Shawley,
a genuinely western lad who wants to
see how they do things away down
east. The young men plan to return
to this prairie by auto during the sum
mer.
«****«&
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REPORT OF CONDITION OF UNION STATE BANK
DECEMBER 31, 1918
WE OWNI
59,944.04
Cash and due from banks .
U. S. Securities, Stocks,Warrants 35,812.05
Loans and discounts---
Banking house, furniture and fix.
ass
265.815.03
23,725.00
•385,296.12
WE OWE
303.365.95
20 , 000.00
885.38
1 , 000.00
Deposits-
Bills Payable-
Reserved for Taxes
Other liabilities-building reserve
• 325 , 251.33
THIS LEAVES
Capital stock paid in
Surplus and undivided profits- 10,044.79
... 50,000.00
- 60 , 044.79
which is a guarantee fund for the protection of our depositors
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM
Clothes Satisfaction
begins with the
selection of your
suit when you
buy Born Tailor
ing.
Ü
I
|
Woolens in un
limited variation
of weave and
coloring permit a
suitable choice
of fabric — you
dictate any style
features your
fancy may sug
gest — you
added satisfac
tion in the price. J
94
m
find
Copyright 1916
The Royal Tailors
Chicago— New York
"tm
In fact you sell yourself exactly j
what you want instead of buying |
what some one wants to sell you.
Try the Born idea of clothes sat
isfaction once and you will insist
upon it always.
New Spring Line Now on Display
r.
*
THE STORE Or QUALITY
v
0.
Keep Your
on This Space
Gem State Barber Shop
J. D. McCown, Prop'r
Now is the Time
To have your car fixed and fixed right. The rush will soon be on
and then each must take his turn. A first-class mechanic on the
job here and his work is guaranteed satisfactory. The Old Reliable
Shop.
I Nezperce Garage & Machine Works
FIRE PROOF BUILDING c
BENJ. KIENHOLZ & SON, Proprietors •

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