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The Nezperce herald. (Nezperce, Idaho) 1900-1957, February 20, 1919, Image 8

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055082/1919-02-20/ed-1/seq-8/

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SHOES
?
A
f This Week We Received a
À Good Liberal Shipment of
Our Spring Order of La=
dies' and Misses' Shoes
We 110w have a complete line
vJT of ladies' grey shoes, in both
Battleship grey and Field Mouse grey, 8 1-2
inch tops of nice, soft vici kid, with either
military or French heels, at $8.50 per pair.
We offer for spring an ex
IJlclLli ceptionally good value in a
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I
9
ladies' black vici kid shoe with 8 1-2 in. top,
either military or French heel, all widths,
at $7.50 the pair.
?
i
A See ouf line of Havana
W Dr UW II Brown shoes in both vici
and Corodo tan calf, leather and cloth tops,
both military and French heels, all widths,
at $7.50, $8.50 and $9.50 the pair.
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In our shoe line we offer you the very best shoes it is possible to
make. We carry nothing but a solid leather line of shoes and sell
them at a price that has made our shoe business by far the biggest
shoe business in this whole section of the country. Once you buy a
Star brand shoe, you will always be a shoe customer of curs.
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New Spring Goods

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We expect to arrive this week our lines of
Wash Goods, Waists, Furnishings and Undermus
lins. If they get here in time we will have them
on display Saturday and cordially invite you to
come in and see what will be worn for spring.
f
We will, as usual, this spring show a larger and
better assortment to select from than any other
store. The prices will be as reasonable as present
prices will permit and at that we will guarantee to
sell you merchandise this spring as cheap as any
catalogue you may receive. If we are given the
opportunity to figure with you we are sure we will
be able to land your business.
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We're Both Losers if
You Don't Trade Here
«
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, PUBLIC SCHOOL NEWS i|
HÎE
g
mIusiu?
tygosBS
-
an*
last Sat
night beat Cottonwood 22
We will try to have
another game for
night.
The high school literary
e(y is planning upon giving tu
public programs early in Marc
Watch tor the dates.
The basketball team
unlay
to 34.
Saturday
socr
ci
i
for the
in the high
Friday,
with an
Smith
An average of grades
month of February
school was made last
Lelah Greek led again
average of 99 VF
came second with 98% and Daisy
Brown third with
Kdith
97. Other
John Flat!
s
above ninety were :
95; Florence Stouter, 951/5; Sam
95% ; Olive Erickson,
Milton Johnson, 95%; Josephine
Thomas, 94%; Blanche Seehorn
94*/> ; Edna Cargill, 941/4; Blbei
Stell mon, 93%; Violet Smith
92; Maude Jamison, 91%; Anit;
Swartz, 91%; Herschell Basket 1
91%; Kathryn Dennis, 91%; dot
91V4 ; Alta
95
Fink,
i
91%
Bell,
1 arrar,
Esther Lehman,
Hutchens, 91; Lois
Alice Platt, 90%.
averages he.tween ninety
eighty were: Dorothy Harbin
89% ; Mabel Erickson
Harry Fink,
Longeteig, 891
89%.;
Felix
91%;
91
Harris
Those havin
am
98
William
Deh
89%. ;
89% ;
; William
Jessie Waters,
Hutchins
ms,
Charles
Stell mon, 88; Boy Howe
Fima Cook, 87%; Wesley Longe
86%; Fan
88% ;
ar
^7%
teig, 87; Leona Hess,
nie Farrar, 85% ; Merwin
ing, 85 ;
Florence
Covey, 84% ; John Stouter, 86%;
Hart
Mabel Mitchell, 85
Starjton, 84%; Forest
Marie Poteet, 83% ;
82 ; Clayton Miller, 82;. Loja
son,
Adams, 80%; Ruby Smith, 80%
Sylvesta Gross, 8Ô; Curry Felt,
80. Those having grades below
were: Will Hines, Ce
eighty
celia Jacobs, Fay Harris, Delma
Sullivan,
Eleanor
Crumpaeker.
I
Marguerite O'Connor,
•Medved and Marion
Meeting - to Organize World War
Veterans.
A movement is on foot" to or
ganize a local camp of World
War Veterans, and a meeting to
this end will be held at the city
hall in Nezperce, Monday even
ing, March 3. Every returned
soldier and jailor who had any
actual connection with the ser
vice, at home or abroad, is ask
ed to be present and assist in
starting the organization off
with a hurrah.
This is a nation-wide move
ment, and local camps have al
ready been established in many
communities and counties. Now
good time to start in Lewis.
is a
Tell all the boys.
A Veteran.
Harry Kennedy received a bad
gash across his forehead yester
day while cutting wood in the
Alpine district. In making a
stroke wth his axe, the sharp
blade glanced and rebounded in
such a way as to strike him over
the right eye, inflicting a wound
that required five stitches to
close. Fortunately the blow was
not sufficient to fracture the
skull, and the young man is said
to be getting along as well as
might be expected.
A. E.
County Farm Agent
Wade went to Moscow Sunday
to attend a conference on agri
cultural extension work.
WHY HE STOOD UP.
Patience—I saw Harry at the pa
triotic meeting last night. He was in
khaki,
Patrice—Oh, you saw him, did
you?
"Yes, and he was so patriotic that
he stood up during the entire meet
93
mg.
Oh, that wasn't altogether patri
otism. He's joined the cavalry, you
know, and yesterday was the first
day he'd tried to ride a horse.
((
w
STAYED WITH THEM.
A marine confided to the surgeon
who was dressing his w'ouncl that his
company had, at one point, swarmed
up to the German artillery and taken
the guns. - "Were you able to .brin
them back?" the doctor wanted to
know.
■ f
Ö
Bring them hack? H—, we're
camping there.
BUT NOT SO GOOD.
Church—Why, this typewriting is
awful ! Look at all the wrong words
in the letter.
Gotham—I know. My typewriter
is like all the other women. She's
using substitutes.
FATAL ENVELOPE
< By MARGARET D. JOYCE. j.
(Copyright, 191S, by the McClure Newspa
per Syndicate.)
It was Saturday afternoon, and Mar
tha Graham was on her way home af
ter a very busy morning In the office
of n large leather concern,
neared the new tunnel she pouted, "I
don't like this new way of going home."
But she later changed her mind.
After depositing her fare in the
slot she started down the stairs. Half
way down site spied an envelope which
was being trampled on by the crowd.
As she stooped to pick It up, the on
rushing crowd would have thrown her
down If a young sailor had not caught
her in the nick of time,
stammered, "Thank you." Tipping his
hat he 'soon disappeared Into the wnit
As she
She half
ing train.
A second later Martha remembered
where she was, and hurried Into the
train just before the door closed.
crowded.
As usual the train was
Martha was about to reach for a strap,
when she felt a light tup on her shoul
der. Turning, she saw the same young
who had previously befriended
He offered >ior his sent, which
man
her.
was gladly accepted.
.After a short ride she reached her
little furnished room
It was not
destination, a
which she called "home."
until now that she opened the envel
which had caused so much con
She extracted a ticket which i
ope
fusion.
would admit one to the baseball game j
that afternoon.
Now Martha had never attended a |
hall game, so she then and there de- ,
elded to go, as everyone talked a great |
deal about this beloved pastime.
She hurriedly ate a meager meal,
which was satisfying to her, as the ,
thoughts of attending one of the world j
series games gave her but little ap- I
petite. As she thought of the happen
ings of that morning she decided that
It would have been uneventful without
the helpful sailor. Indeed, she thought
of him more than once.
After a groat deal of wasted time
she left the house and proceeded to
the park where the game was to be
played.
As she handed the ticket to the man
she blushed guiltily at the thought of
cheating some one from a goofi game
She 'passed through a great deal of
rigmarole, and finally was seated In
the front row of the bleachers.
Five minutes or more elapsed, and
"Martha, nervously glancing around,
saw her friend the sailor, who In re
ality was John Lynn, coining to a va
cant scat beside her. He very quickly
recognized her, and by the time the
game started they were chatting mer
rily.
The game proceeded, and Martha
found herself cheering ns lustily as
any of the other fans. She decided
which side she wanted to win and put
all her strength In yelling for them.
Finally the game ended, the score In
favor of Martha's choice.
John received Martha's permission to
escort her home. By the time they
reached there they were like old
friends.
As the weeks passed the sailor and
the once lonesome girl's friendship
ripened into love. But Fate destined
to change this state of hljss; It came
shortly. John came to see Martha,
and he had sad news for her.
ship was to sail for service In for
eign waters for the duration of the
war.
His
Martha bravely bore the news until
he left the house. Then she cried un
til her eyes were red and swollen.
The next two weeks were occupied
by shopping and getting ready for the
departure.
The night before he -went John put
a solitaire on Martha's finger, and as
"Dan Cupid" sounded the call to arms,
ever-rendy John and Martha re
sponded.
Women in Britain Cut Logs.
A. quarter of a million women in
England are now working more or less
regularly on the land, says the London
Observer. The great majority are vil
lage women who go out from their cot
tages and work for the farmers. Seven
thousand are in the new land army,
which employs women who are re
cruited for a certain term and sends
them wherever they are required.
The women in the land army enlist
hither for 12 or six months. In case of
months there is no training. She goes [
straight away to the land and begins j
on the work requiring less skill. Serv
ices of women enrolled in the land !
12 months they receive two complete
outfits fre
ç, consisting of a dress,
corduroy breeches, strong .boots, leg
gings, overalls and hat. They also get
for tlie year one jersey and one mack
intosh. They are given four or six
weeks' free instruction at a training
center. Their pay on the farm ranges
from $2 to $5 a week.
For a girl who joins the army for six
army are available for timber cutting
and hay baling.
Why Not, Bully?
Have we no English word of accla
mation that we must cry "Bravo !" ré
gardless of gender or number? The
headline of a newspaper column in
honor of a feminine nation this week
—Bravo, Italy!"—looked more than
usually barbarous. Italia has Indeed
been brave, and one would like to tell
her so without outraging her gram
mar. But let the English admirer
note that the Italian adjective is not
the equivalent of our "brave." It
stands for good quality in nnyorte
painter, diplomat, grocer, cook.—Lon- !
don Chronicle.
4
*
Will Buy
4 Big
10c
Tablets
This Week
at
Leo 's
Pharmacy
j
„ ,, , , ^
. March 1st, 1,119,
; dersigned committee will sell lots
j 4 mid 2 of block 13, Xez Perce
Addition to Lewiston, to the I
highest bidder for cash for the I
Lewiston Red Cash Chapter. I
These lots face north and east I
., r . ( . are on t ] ie 8th St. pavement I
, vhioh j g the raain route to the I
. • . .....le I
^ Orchards, Tammany I
a ' ul ' Vaha - No grading is nee I
^ssar^, a fine location for a I
home. Do you not plan at some I
time in the near future to have I
a home and live in Lewiston? I
An abstract showing merci- 1
ant-able title to these lots will be I
furnished to the purchaser. |
Tire sale will be made at pub-1
lie auction at Lewiston on March I
1st, and in order to give all an j
even chance, sealed bids may be |
mailed to Mr. Frank Morris, 616 j
Main »St., Lewiston, Idaho, to be I
received by him before the sale; I
the bidding is done, I
the sealed bids will be opened, j
and the person who, either by j
sealed or public open hid, offers |
the most, gets the property.
Frank Morris, j
J. M. Gilmore, I
Committee, j
Lewiston Lots for Red Cross.
the un
as soon as
Route Three News.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Steinhaus
and son Charles, autoed to llo,
Mondav, spending the clay with
; jjp Steinhaus' father and moth- j
1
'
er.
Miss Lillie Harbke spent Sat-3
•ith Mrs-1
family, I
urday and Sunday
Fred Steinhaus and
southwest of town, Miss Harle
returning home Monday morn
ing with a good supply of but «
cups and ferns which they ga
breaks,
has been
throat the
w
m
ered on the canyon
Miss Leona Hess
:
im
troubled with a sore
last few days, but is better again.
Be, sure and attend the e
munity meeting at the M®
school house Friday,
The Turner Bros., who
spending the winter m Cam
nia, expect to he at home ag
by the first of March.
' Mrs. Ed. Bell has been
sick list, this last week, but
reported much better. ,
Curtis and Clifford Bell spent
Sunday with Charles Steinbg
Mrs. Robert Near spent firm •
afternoon at the home ox
C. C. Hess, both being busily* j
gaged "taking off'' some
crochet patterns,
(i
the
on
.
In its series of letters aa< îl^ r „ J
ies The Herald is P abl S I
from the Lewis county sol* • |
who have participated m " F *
activities against the
Prance and Belgium, the
one will he from Corpora • |
Drake, who, in the 361st Machine 8
Gun company of the 91st ^ 9
ion, was wounded in the '
ders front fighting, and re ■
returned to his home 11 ^
vicinity of Kamiah. H 1S , %' f
adds ,a very interesting -
It will an- I
next week- I
next
1° the lug history oui
e d make over there,
—[pear in these columns
a
The Herald. $1-50 a year. g

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