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Lewiston evening teller. (Lewiston, Idaho) 1900-1900, August 20, 1900, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055113/1900-08-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE LEWISTON EVENING TELLER
Volume 24
LEWISTON, IDAHO, MONDAY, AUGUST 20, 1900.
Number
IAO
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HUNTING SEASON
OPENS AUGUST 15
Wc have a full stock of shells
in all sizes of shot, different
bores—10, 12 and 14, powder
and shot, cleaners, in fact
everything you need except
the game c* ** u* j* j* „•*
I DENT & BUTLER, Drugs.
Telephone
15
Quick Meal
Wickless
Blue Flame
Oil Stoves
EASY TO OPERATE
ABSOLUTELY SAFE
No smoke or smell, and are pronounced so by all
users, kl I CHEN COOLERS for this warm weather
2S6, Main St.
FLETCHER HARDWARE CO.
1 Hats Off, Please.
ATTENTION!
take off your hat—look at
IT—YOU NEED A NEW ONE.
WE HAYE THEM, STYLE AND
QUALITY, ALL THAT CAN BE DE
SIRED. WE ARE OUT OF SOME
SIZES IN SOME KINDS BUT THE
LOT CONTAINS ALL SIZES.
THIS LOT TO CLOSE AT ABOUT
HALF PRICE. THINK OF IT, A f.y.so
HAT FOR <fM OQ AND OTHER
PRICES IN *r '*/0 1 . K()IH)RTION
Wholesale
Retail
O. A. KJOS I
PURIFICATION OF WATER
-Ql
«
W ATER is no more necessary to life
than pure water is to health. Be
cause persous have drank ques
tionable water and still live is no evi
dence that they would not have lived
better on pure water. Because one sur
vives a dose of poison, it is is no reason
that poison is good or harmless.
IT IS REASONABLE,
if a badly polluted water causes severe
and fatal" disease, that slightly impure
water may slowly undermine the health
by being the cause of a host ot ailments
and inabilities of body for which the suf
ferer finds no apparent cause.
When a city is supplied with only
doubtfully pure water, no family should
lie without a private filter.
We are Sole Agents for the
PASTEUR
GERM PROOF
FILTER.
Call and See Them Work
T . he CASH HARDWARE STORE |
9
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G.j'K.T
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JAPAN
REPORTS
News From the Japanese
Legation Tells how Al
lies Entered Pekin.
FIGHTING STILL
IN PROGRESS
Chinese Entrenched in the Imperial
Palace Still Offer Strong Re
sistance.
Washington, Aug. 20.—The follow-!
ing dispatch was received this morning
by the Japanese legation from the minis
i ter of foreign affairs:
After the entry to Pekin was effected
by the allied troops on the 15th, the!
Chinese troops retreated to the imperial
palace and remained there. A hod, of
Japanese troops was detailed to guard the
palace. They encountered the enemy
in force and a stubborn battle followed
which has continued ever since.
The Japanese have established head
quarters in the legation division of the
city, but the army is mainly quartered in
the villages outside the walls.
I The Japanese consul at Amoy tele
Î ;
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to
Uncle Sam: You cannot catch a goldfish with silver
bait, Willie.
graphs under date of the 18th. that from
the interior it is reported that at Ting
Chow Fu and Lung Yuen Chow several
Christian chapels were destroyed by mobs.
The anti-Christian movement seems to
Ik- spreading in the district of Chan ( 'how
Fu. There are no foreign ministers in
the interior however.
The Japanse consul general at Shang
hai telegpalis as follows
''From Sheng's statement to me I am
inclined tothink that only minor officials
are left in Pekin. The empress dowager,
at least, il not the emperor, left upon the
approach of the allied forces. I have also
gathered from reliable sources that Prince
Chung Yung Lu Kaing is still in Pekin.
Unna Wants Peace.
Washington, Aug. 20.—Chinese Min
ister Wii this morning transmitted to the
state department a cablegram from Li
Hung Chang, asking this government to
appoint a committee to negotiate with
him for peace and for the settlement of
the troubles in China. He suggests that
Minister Conger lie appointed on such
commission, as he is familiar with the
conditions existing.
Casualities at Pekin
Washington, Aug. 20.—Admiral Re
niev cables this morning as follows from
Taku :
An authentic report front Pekin dated
the 15th from Litmau says: The .troops
this morning entered the imperial city,
cleaning out the city. All the Americans
who remained in the city are well.
There were no deaths except one child.
Captain Myers has recovered from his
wound, hut now has typhoid fever hut
is convalescent. Assistant surgeon is re
covering from his wound in the leg. The
following were killed in the siege: Ser
geant J. Forning, privates C. B Ring, J.
W. Kenedy, R. E. Thomas, A. Turner,
H. Fischer. Wounded: Privates J
Schoeder, Elbow; seven dangerously ill
from fever; seamen J. Mitchel, arm: seven
recovering.
Met the Enemy.
Lon IKIN', Aug. 20.— Lord Roberts re
ports that General Covington met aud
defeated a strong force of Boers at BuflW
shod, on'the »6th, Commander Schuortz
tieing severely wounded. The English
lost Captain Harvey and two men killed,
and nine wounded.
Official dispatches confirm Boer rejH»rts
that Baden Powell and De Wet, the Boer
commander who slipped through the
British lines with his men, exchanged
messages. De Wet has gone north, Pow
ell following. Paget's brigade fought
the enemy and occupied Waterval where
the Boers kept prisoners. Four Boers
were wounded.
Killed by a Posse.
Fari.kv, Mo,, Aug. 20.—Doe Herring
tou of this state shot and killed Widow
Rollins and James Wallace. Harrington
escejied hut was followed by Sheriff
Dillingham. When the slieiiff overtook
the fugutive a fight ensued in which the
sheriff was killed by Herrington. Ill turn
Herrington, while trying to escajie, was
shot and killed by one of the posse in
pursuit.
Germans at Pekin.
Bkri.in, Aug. 20.—An official dispatch
reports a German detachment of two ba
billions of marines at Pekin. Two
hallions of marines will follow imme
diately.
Goebel Murder Afain.
Lexington, Ky., Aug. 20.—The trial
of Henry Yonsley tor complicity in the
Goebel murder began tnis morning.
Yonsley appeared very pale. A confer
ence of those engaged in the defense oc
cupied most ot the day.
A New Minister.
Constantinople Aug. 20— Leki Bei
has been appointed ministerto the United
States.
Message Not Maae Public.
\\ ASHINGTON, Aug. 2 . — Secretary
Adee said the commuuclation from Li
Hung Chang will probably Ik 1 considered
by the cabinet tomorrow
\\ ti lias no doubt that the emperor and
empress dowager have left Pekin placing
implicit confidence on Chang's dispatch
of yesterday that the court had gone to
Hsian Fu.
Campaign Opens.
Skoai.ia, Mo., Aug. 20.—A big polit
ical meeting was held in Sedalia today
to mark the formal opening of the Mis
souri democratic campaign. Former
congressman Dockery, candidate for gov
ernor, and his associates on the state
ticket were present and there was an
abundance of democratic orators from
this and other states to exjKnmd the
party principles to the great crowds
present. The feature of the forenoon
was a parade of political clubs in which
St. Louis, Kansas City, St. Joseph and
other cities were represented. Speech
making occupied the afternoon and a
big rally is scheduled for this evening
A
SPECIAL
GUARD
Chicago Police Will Em
ploy Extra Men to Pro
tect the President
FEAR
ANARCHISTS
Precautions Taken to Guard Me
Klnley While at Chicago En
campment.
Chicago, Aug. 2o.—It is rumored in
police circles that an appeal 1ms lieen
made for extraordinary precaution
against attempts to assassinate President
McKinley duiing the Grand Army en
campment. Fifty detectives have lieen
ordered in from outlying stations to give
sjiecial attention to that feature of police
work.
Farmers' National Congress.
Color a no Springs, Colo., Aug. 20 —
I he twentieth annual session of the
farmers National Congress was called to
order at 10 o'clock this morning by act
ing President R. F. I). Candage, of Mass
achusetts. Delegates are present from
nearly every Htate aud territory. Par
ticularly large delegations are present
from the Mississippi valley, and the Pa
cific ex.not also has a substantial represen
tation. The morning session was devoted
to the work of organization. After an
invocation by Rev. W. F. Slocan, presi
dent of Colorado College, tile delegates
listened to addresses of welcome deliver
ed by Gilbert McClurg, secretary of the
Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce
and Mayor J. R. Robinson. Colonel J.
N, Stuhl, of Chicago, and Major G. N.
Ryals, of Savannah, G«., responded for
the visitors. President Candage then de
livered bis annual address, which was
listened to with closest attention by the
many delegates who frequently inter
rupted the speaker with their applause.
At the conclusion of the president's ad
dress a recess was taken until this after
noon when the delegates reassemble to
listen to addresses by B. F. Clayton, of
Ohio, and H, J. Redding, secretary of ag
riculture, of Georgia. The present ses
sion of the congress, which lasts four
days, promises to Ik' very important.
Among the chief subjects slated for dis
eussion are the relation of farming to
manufacturing and transportation, mer
chant marine, taxation, irrigation, inter
oceanic canal, and good roads.
Has Gone East.
Bkri.in, Aug. 20.—Waldese started for
the east today, accompanied by his stuff
A brilliant gathering honored him upon
his departure.
^wwvw v vvv
THE
OWL : DRUG
STORE
-IS THF, PLACK FOR—
ICE
CREAM
SODA
WE
USE PURE CREAM
Wholesale and Reiaie
, • - i VrtomuL
Democrats Assembling:.
MtLWAl KKK, \Vis., Aug 21.—The ho
tels are filling up with democratic poli
liciatia from all over the state who are
here to attend the democratic state con
vention which meets at noon tomorrow
iu the German theatre. The convention
will place a full state ticket in nomina
tion. Clark L. Hood, of La Crosse, has
been selected as temporary chairman of
the convention. Nothing is settled upon
regarding the nominations and so far as
most of the places on the ticket are con
cerned it appears to lie a free-for-all race,
lands Bohnirich, of Kenosha, seems to lie
the man most prominently mentioned in
connection with the gubernatorial nomi
nation. The populists have also issued
a call for their state convention to lie held
1n Milwaukee tomorrow, hut the leaders
of both parties say that no plan of fusion
has lieen considered..
The Pathos of War.
London, Aug. 20.—The pathos of war
is strikingly illustrated by au incident
which occurred this week at Brighton.
In one or the main thoroughfares of the
town a cartoon of "President Kruger fly
ing from Pretoria'' was exhibited on the
large plate glass window of a stationer's
store. A boy, of about 7 years of age,
was seen looking at the curtoou and, af
ter a lew moments, selected a large stone
from the roadway and deliberately hurled
it at the figure of Kruger, smashing the
window, lakeu to the police station and
examined as to w'hy be threw the vtonr,
the little fellow sobbed; "'('aiise that man
killed my father." Inquiries elicited the
fact that the hoy's father was slain iu ac
tion in South Africa.
Labor Unions in Session.
Nrw Brunswick, N.J., Aug. 20.—it
is proposed by the officers of the New
Jersey Federation of Trades and Ubor
Unions, which convened iu twenty
second annual session in this city this
morning to adopt measures which will
mark the meeting as one of the most im
portant labor conferences of recent years.
As soon as the convention hud been
called to order the official call for the
gathering was read by the secretary.
The call said in part:
"The growing demands of labor, or
ganized aud unorganized, the need of
more strongly asserting our rights iu leg
islative halls and the courts, the flagrant
abuse ot authority in tile uusurgation of
civil authority by militarism as practiced
in Shoshone county, Idaho, in time of
peace; the indiscriminate granting by
prejudiced judges, of unjnst, unwarrant
ed, and, iu many eases, unconstitutional,
injunctions against labor organizations;
the increasing combinations of capital
ami great industries; the gradual trans
forming of human lieings into mere chat
tels all lend to emphasize the necessity
of the workers meeting in closer affilia
tion to calmly deliberate 011 such action
and steps as will liest advance the inter
ests and uphold the rights and privileges
oflubor."
Made a Record.
The crew on one of the J. McCormick
threshing machine outfits made a record
last Friday which is hard to heat. They
threshed aud sacked 1635 sacks of barley
iu one day, setting four timesand moved
three times. It took them just 14 min
utes to move from one setting, which iu
itself is a record.
WE SELL
1
\V A T E K M A N ' S
ideal fountain
PENS BECAUSE WE
CAN GUARANTEE
EACH AND EYERY
ONE OF THEM.
A COMPLETE LINE
OF T H K M c O N
STANTLYON HAND
AT PRICKS RANG
ING FROM <12.50 to
*6 EACH.
Thatcher &
j Kling ♦ * ., 1
Swim *-*■*•- - - - |- I || - | rvtj

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