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Lewiston evening teller. (Lewiston, Idaho) 1900-1900, September 03, 1900, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055113/1900-09-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE LEWISTON EVENING TELLER
Volume 24
LEWISTON, IDAHO, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER
19cm.
Number 152
» Before Your Children Start to School
%
S UPPLY THLM WITH BOOKS, TABLETS
PENCILS, SCHOOL BAGS, PENCIL
BOXES, LUNCH BOXES, PAPER AND EVERY
THING THEY NEED, AM) BUÏ THEM WHERE
YOU HAVE THE LARGEST AND BEST STOCK
TO SELECT PROM a l
Tel. 15
DENI & BUTLER, Druggists
V wvw
VV WM- V
Quick Meal
Wickless
Blue Flame
Oil Stoves
»
>
L
EASY TO OPERATE
ABSOLUTELY SAFE
No smoke or smell, and are pronounced so by all
users. KITCHEN COOLERS for this warm weather
2S6, Main St.
AAAAAA A i
--FLETCHER HARDWARE CO.
Are Most
Children, and
HARD ON CHILDREN
It is l>ecause so few are shaped right. Our shapes are
down to date and fit just like grown up people's shoes
This season a special feature of
HARD ON SHOES
h
School Shoe Warranted
WiVtViV.ViVi
Shoes......
CORRECTLY
FITTING
CHILDREN'S
FEET.*.«
So that the tendency will lie tc
develop the feet naturally
We here show a cut of the English shape. A line that
we bank on for all-around service—carried in lace and
button Vici Kid and Kangaroo Calf
'jm Prices: 5 to 8, $1.25; 8% to 11, $1.50; U'A to 2, $1.50
Top Xotch of Perfection ut the price
S Wholesale and Retail 0 # ^ KJ0S
... A k k ,he '"proor of all makes. The easi
est handled, lightest draft, most durable and turn the
soil perfectly. Can be adjusted to work on side hills,
where others fail. Have dust proof hub bands and
many Points of superiority over all others. Made in all
*n S r ,h S1 EEL or CHILI.ED bottoms and Riding
wort, 1 n| . ( " m P" them with others and see then,
"ork and you will buy a Canton. Manufactured by
PARLIH & ORENDORFF CO.. CANTON, ILLINOIS.
CALL on Us
Before Pur
chasing and
Get PRICES
CANTON DISC i HARROW.
Is all steel, which makes it very strong and durable.
It is simple in construction and has less parts to wear
than any Disc made. 1 he chilled journal bearings are
entirely dust-proof and can be easily oiled. There »s
absolutely no end thrust to wear on the bearings.
The gangs are so arranged that they cannot raise
out of the ground in the center, but easily adjust them
selves to dead ftirrow«. or low places in rough ground.
A trial will convince you that the Canton is without
an equal. Manufactured by
PARLIN & ORENDORFF CO . CANTON. ILLINOIS.
aaap Ba jm HQ
""¥? /
The CASH HARDWARE STORE
18$ ©Äf !
CANTON
I fiant
1 Plows..
A Car Load
Just Arrived
CCr
BOXERS
RALLYING
Pekin to be Retaken from
the Allied Forces and
Destroyed.
THE SACRED
INNER CITY
May be Razed lo the Earth and
the Americani May Aid in the
Destruction.
j Pekin via Shanghai, Sept. 2.—Ac
; cording to numerous reports many tliou
I samls of Boxers who were scattered on
the arrival of allies are again massing to
I attack Pekin. These rumors create great
uneasiness. Cliing Na Tung and Chang
Li, members of Tsung Li Yamen, are try
ing to negotiate with the generals who
allied forces through Sir Robert Hart,
director of municipal customs to prevent
destruction of the imperial palace of the
forbidden city.
I With some object in view the Russians
have oecup ied the palace. Resident
j Americans hope negotiations will not
succeed. They think the city ought to
j he completely destroyed, that Na Tung
I Chang should l>e beheaded since they
formed part of the cabal which caused
the murder of Baron von Ketller ami
attempted to massacre all the foreigners,
no leniency should he shown or the next
generation of will repeat the crime.
Princess Ching states that Prince
Cliing, pro-foreign Chinese leader, wanted
to communL-ate with General Chaffee,
hut Was informed by the general that lie
would have to first confer with other al
lied generals and would give the prince
a reply tomorrow whether or not an in
terview would lie desirable.
Democrats Carry Arkansas.
Litter Rock, Ark , Sept. 3.—The
good weather prevailing throughout the
state today promises to bring out a larger
vote than was expected. The estimated
majority of Jefferson Davis, the democrat
candidate for governor, over his oppo
nents, IL L. Runnel, the republican can
didate and Almer W. Files, the populist,
will reach 50,000 The populist vote will
not exceed 1,000. The feature of the
feature of the election in the enormous
negro vote being polled, which will ex
cee<l that of any year since 1871.
Negros are voting solidly for Runnel
and Buck.
Campaign Opened in Kentucky.
j Lorsvn.i.H, Ky., Sept. 3.— Dispatches
j received at democratic state headquar
ters today state that the campaign was
: auspiciously opened throughout Ken
tucky today. The programme included
rallies in all the leading cities and towns
of the state and according to report the
meetings were enthusiastic and well at
tended. It is planned to keep the cam
paign going on at a lively rate through
out Kentucky from now on and many
democratic orators of national prominence
hove been engaged to take part.
j ' Postoffice Clerks in Session
Atlantic Crrv, Sept.3.—The National
Association of I'ostoffice Clerks was I
j called to order in annual convention here
today with delegates present from many
parts of the country. President Thomas
J. Donnelly occupied the chair and pre
sented his annual address showing the
progress made by the organization since
its last convention. The gathering will
he in session three days and will con
sider a number of matters of vast im
portance to its members throughout the
country.
Letter Carriers Meet.
Detroit, Mich., Sept. 3.—Detroit 1
gracefully capitulated today to an army
composed of fully 5,000 left« r carriers, j
, who invaded the city with banners flying
* and bands playing- They came from all
I
1
j
parts of the country to take part in a big
parade today and the nth annual con
vention of the National Association of
letter carriers, which togius its business
sessions here tomorrow morning. It is
estimated that there were fully 6,000
men in line this afternoon. Large dele
gations, each with its own hand at its
head, were furnished by Chicago, Cincin
nati, Grand Rapids, Columbus and Ann
Arbor. Torouto Hamilton and other
cities across the border were also repre
sented by fraternal delegations.
The line was led by John N. Parsons,
national president, and other officers of
the association. Occupying seats on the
reviewing stand were the guestsof honor,
among the number being Postmaster
General Smith, A. W. Machen, superin
tendent of the free delivery system; W.
1-Mens, superintendent of the free deliv
ery system of the western district, and
Postmaster Gordon, of Chicago. After
the parade luncheon was served to the
carriers in the Light Guard armory,
while the visiting bands gave a concert.
This evening there w ill lie a reception
with addresses by a number of men of
national prominence.
The sessions of the convention will oc
cupy several days. The most important
matter to lie considered is the "pension
bill." It is not the purpose of the car
riers to ask congress to give them any
thing, hut simply to ask for the passage
of a law requiring a percentage of their
salaries to be deducted, the money so de
ducted to he used to create a Tuud, 011
which carriers having served twenty
years or more may be retired on half
pay. The reports to be presented to the
convention will show that the association
has made gratifying progre-s both nu
merically and financially during the last
twelve months. The same is true of the
mutual benefit insurance branch of the
association.
The present officers of the National As
sociation are: President, John N. Par
sons, New York; vice-president, Charles
D. Duffy, Chicago; secretary, K- J. Cant
well, Brooklyn; treasurer, Alexander Mc
Monald, Grand Rapids.
The association was given birth at a
conference of letter-carriers held in Mil
waukee in August, 1SS9. The idea of the
founders was that < nly by a unity ol pur
pose and method could the condition of
this important body of ii.ixxj federal em
ployes he improved. The main object
at the time of organization was to secure
an increased salary for letter-carriers, and
its labors during the first year of its ex
istence were chiefly to that end. The
first annual convention was held in Bos
ton in 1890. A tout fifty cities were rep
resented, and there were fifty-three
branches of the association. During the
last decade the association has increased
rapidly in membership until it now em
biaces the carriers in all the chief cities
of the country Since the Boston gath
ering conventions have been held in De
troit, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Cleve
land, Grand Rapids, San Francisco, To
ledo and Scianton.
The policy of the association is now
and always has tocn tocooperate with the
postoffice department for the improve
ment of the service, and as a the
utmost friendly feeling existaiietweenthe
officials of the postoffice depamhe^ and
the National association. In the lastN^'
tort of Perry S. Heath as First Assistant*
Postmaster General, he spoke in the
highest terms of the association and gave
it a great deal of credit for the high state
of efficiency existing in the free-delivery
ssrvice.
Odell for Governor
Saratoga, N. Y., Sept. 3.—-There is
hardly any impartial observer here who I
does not believe that the ticket to he
nominated by tomorrow's republican
state convention will to headed by Ben
jamin B. Odell, Jr., and that the other
state officers will he nominated with the
exception of the lieutenant-governor.
The second place on the ticket, is in
fact, the only one concerning which there
is any doubt. The New York delegation
favors the selection of ex-Mayor Schie
ren of Brooklyn, hut Mr. Schieren him
self has so tar displayed no eagerness for
the honor. All of the delegates have not
yet arrived, hut there )s a sufficient nuin
tor from Syracuse here to keep the talk
of State Senator Horace White's candi
dacy tofore the public. The leaders of
the party are busy at the United States
hotel today putting the finishing touches
to the platform to be adopted by the con
vention. The platform will to exceed
ingly brief and will deal largely with
state issues.
LADIES,
Huy your home-made Bread, Doughnuts,
Cake, etc* at the Woman's Exchange, tf
AFRICA
ANNEXED
Lord Roberts Issues a
Proclamation by Order
of the Queen.
PHILIPPINO
OUTBREAK
A Big Hr« Occurs in Spokane this
Afternoon, Destroying a Large
Warehouse.
Lon iion , Sept. 3.—Under date of Bel
fast, Sept. I.—Lord Roberts reports:
"I have today issued under her maj
esty's warrant of July 4, proclamations
announcing that the Transvaal will hence
forth form a part of her majesty's do
main."
Caprtown, Sept. 3.—The communica
tion to the assembly of I,ord Roberts'
proclamation announced the annexation
of the South Atricau republic to here
after to known as Transvaal, was greeted
by the oppotftion with silence, by the
ministerialists with prolonged cheering.
Outbreak in Philippines.
Washington Sept. 3.—The war de
partment today received the following
dispatch from General McArthur;
"Manila, Sept. 3.—Adjutant General,
Washington: General Hughes rejmrts
un outbreak in Bohol. First Lieutenant
Lovnh Forty-fourth volunteer infantry
teports an engagement near Carmen. At
Bohol the lost in killed was: I, wounded
6. Enemy's loss in killed, 120. No fur
ther details were given. McArthur."
Bohol is an island in the southern part
of the archipelago, 365 miles from Man
ila. It lies north of the large island
Mindanao, not far from Cebu.
Fire in Spokane.
Spokank, Sept. 3.—This afternoon the
large three story brick warehouse of the
Shaw & Wells company, loacaled at (he
corner of Post street and Northern Pacific
railway, burned. Building was filled with
J.50,000 stock of vehicles. Everything in
Ihe two upper stories was destroyed. The
loss is estimated at $30,000 on contents
and $6,ouo on building. Contents were
insured for $31 ,ouo and the liuilding for
$6,000.
Trade Unionists in Session.
Ia»n; Sept. 3.— Atout 400 delegates
representing 1,250,1s« trade unionists
throughout the United Kingdom assem
bled at Huddersfield today at the open
'«g of the thirty-third annual meeting of
the British Trade Union Congress. The
mayor of Huddersfield welcomed the
delegates and the president of the con
1
L.
BUYS ONE OF
E A S T M A N S
BROWNIE
CAMERAS
ONE ROLL OF
FILMS INCH'D
ED....SEND US
ONE DOLLAR
IN STAMPS am.
WE WILL MAIL
IT TO Y O U,
l'(»STAGE PAID
Owl Drug Store
Wholesale and Retail
1 gress called to the platform Sidney J.
Kent, slate commissioner of labor in Ne
braska, who was sent to the congress as a
fraternal delegate by the American Fed
eration La tor. Today's proceedings
were purely routine and the serious busi
ness will l>e taken up tomorrow with the
introduction of the usual flood of resolu
tions. The session promises to to of
more general interest than usual. It is
reported that the moderate members of
the congress will submit a resolution hit
ting at radical socialism in order to strike
blow at the recently organized general
federation of labor unions, which is cotn
l«>sed largely of lator leaders of radical
socialistic tendencies and which, more
over, has met with such success as to
promise to become a strong rival of the
older body.
But few new topics are to to found on
the agenda of the present congress- For
the most part the resolutions will relate
to the time-honored question of old age
pensions, workmeu's compensation,
housing of the working classes, general
eight-hour day and child labor.
A Small Blaze.
Last night at 10 o'clock the frame of
fice building occupied by J. M Harring^
ton on East Main street was discovered
to to on fire, and tofore anyoue could
turn on the alarm the liuilding was a
mass of flames. The office stands ad
joining the Harrington residence on the
east and directly in front of the lutntor
yard owned by Mr. Harrington. Ed
Knight, who discovered the blaze, im
mediately came down to the city hall to
turn on the alarm and assist in hauling
the hose cart. I11 the meantime quite a
crowd of neightoirs had formed a bucket
hiigade and were; using every effort to
extinguish the fire, the object toing to
save the adjoining property. The hose
cart from the second ward was brought
out but the fire plug was so far away tliat
the hose could not to brought within
range, however, the hose from the city
liait station was connected and the water
turned on, hut not before a force of men
had pushed the building over by cutting
joist holding the roof. Louis Harrington
/was sleeping in the building at the time
and barely escaped a severe scorching.
Very few of the office effects were saved
the loss being atout $600 with no in
surance. The origin of the fire remains
a mystery as 110 lights or fire was in the
building at the time.
District Court Opens.
Judge Steele oja-ned the Septeuitor
term of the district court this morning at
loo'clock and devoted most of the time,
in making a preliminary call of the cal
endar. A scondary call was made to set
cases. There are lo criminal and cases
and 47 civil cases on the calendar, hut it
is expected that a number of new rases
will to added tofore the end of the term.
Court adjourned till 2 o'clock, after
which the balance of the day was spent
in hearing arguments to deniurers.
The criminal cases which are 011 the
calendar Hre as follows:
State of Idaho vs E S Sweet, F 1)
Richardson J A Wilkenson and J H Hunt.
State of Idaho vs Chas Moody.
State of Idaho vs S O. Taunaliill, six.
State of Idaho vs Albert Small and
Fred Emery.
State of Idaho vs Cy King et al.
—Wildenthaler delivers fresh bread
twice a day all over the city. Leave
orders with the delivery man for
groceries.
WE SELL
W A T E R M A N ' S
IDEAL FOUNTAIN
PENS BECAUSE WE
CAN GUARANTEE
EACH AND EVERY
ONE OF THEM.
A COMPLETE LINE
OF THEM COX
STANTLYON HAND
AT PRICES RANG
ING FROM $2.50 to
$6 EACH.
Thatcher &
Kling .
♦ ♦ •
SAa

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