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Lewiston daily teller. (Lewiston, Idaho) 1900-1901, November 22, 1900, Image 1

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LEWISTON DAILY TELLER.
Volume 25
LEWIS TON, ÏDAHO, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1900
Number 45
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INDIAN CALENDARS
SOMETHING NEW AND
NOVEL oMj» TAKE A LOOK
AT THEM » ALSO OUR UNE
9L F rJnon* WORK FOR HOLI
DAY GOODS
THE FASHION
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9
9
9
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Tel. l5
SEE
The Largest Assortment of Rubber Goods con
Mating of Syringes of every description, Hot
Water Bags and Combination Syringes ami
Water Bags, Rubber Gloves, etc., you ever
SAW
They can be
SEEN
only at
DENT & BUTLER,
Druggists
TF IN NEED or< a BUGGY or a
1 SPRING WAGON, LOOK at
OUR STOCK WE HAVE
SOME BARGAINS to CLOSE
OUT ::::::::::
FLETCHER HARDWARE COMPANY
WOULD YOU?
Would you like to buy a box of writing paper, with
envelopes to match, of the very finest Venetian Linen,
Prince of Wales Blue Kid, Hurlbut's Old Dorchester
Bond, or Hurd's stock? We have just 100 boxes and
not one box worth less than 25 cents, from that up to
75c, hut if you call soon you w ill have your choice at
15 Cents a Box
We'11 Tell You Why
When yon call. Dont forget to guess
for the $600 Piano when in the store
Mail order customers will have the check sent
©. A. KJOS
SILVERWARE GIVEN AWAY
FREE
Beginning Nov. 15th, and until January
ist, 1901, we shall Give Away absolutely
Free, Quadruple Plated Silverware, of
guaranteed first-class quality.
NO GUESSING
Everybody has a chance to get some.
Just save yonr bills until your purchase
aggregates the required aiuouut and
take the article of your own selection
This is your oyportunity to get a beauti
ful Christmas present at absolutely no
expense to you
THE FAIR
The Place to
Save Money
1 •
KRUGER
LANDED
Received a Great Ovation
From the French and
Boer Delegates.
FIGHTING A
BARBAROUS NATION
Crowd Cheered Madly and Crlet
of Vive Kruger Were Heard
Thanked the French People.
Marseilles, Nov. 22. —At ten forty
five this morning President Kruger
landed from the cruiser Gelderland and
received a vociferous ovation. After
much hand shaking the police wade a
path to the carriages and the procession
started for the hotel The Boer presi
dent occupied a leading carriage and was
cheered wildly along the route.
Marseilles, Nov. 22. —It was nine
thirty when the Gelderland entered the
harbor, firing a salute of twenty-one
guns, to which the light house battery
replied. The streets aud quays presented
an animated scene, the decorations hav
ing been restoted. The Boer flag crossed
with tri-color predominating. There was
a great jam of people on the quay with
the Boer delegates in the foreground who
joyously hailed the aged president.
When Kruger appeared the crowd cheer
ed madly and "Vive Kruger" sounded
in a steady rcyr. Leyds went out to the
cruiser early and returned with the in
formation that the president would
not land till noon but the
committee protested, having waited al
ready thirty hours and were getting
tired, so Kruger was urged to make
haste.
Upon landing Kruger made a speech
thanking the French government for its
sympathy with the Tratisvaal govern
ment and the cordiality of his reception.
His remarks were generally cheered, but
ironical laughter at reference to the
French government's receptioii caused a
temporary disturbance. Proceeding,
Kruger said:
"Since Jamison endeavored to conquer
the country without making a fight a
terrible war has been thrust utx>n us,
notwithstanding our reiterated claim lor
arbitration, which had been refused by
England. The war is a barbarous one
but we have been fighting a barbarous
nation."
Kruger then thanked the committe for
their good wishes and the people of Mar
seilles for their hearty reception. He ex
pressed himself as profoundly touched by
the welcome of France, which was the
home of liberty. Referring again to the
Transvaal Kruger said their farms were
being burned and their wives hunted
from their homes while their husbands
were fighting on the battle field. But
whatever was done the Boers would re
sist to the bitter end. Messrs. Leyds,
Grabbler and Figher stood behind Kru
ger while the speech was delivered.
Despite the great enthusiasm in towu
there has been an entire absence of anti
Knglisli demoustiations.
Kruger spoke 111 dutch, Von Hummer
interpreting. After reaching the hotel
Kruger appeared for a moment at the
balcony and bowed to the crowds, who
: continued cheering long after he disap
• peared.
Kruger granted an exclusive interview
1 to your correspondent at the Hotel De
i noailles. Through an interpreter he said:
I "I come to Europe simply to appeal
: lor intervention. No, the Boers will not
immigrate to Ceniarals, they will con
■ quer or die on their own soil." It is re
! ported the B jers are out of funds and
I that you are bringing all available cash
1 with you. "That is untrue. Schalkbarger
! keeps the Transvaal treasure." What
will you do if intervention fails? "I shall
I remain in Europe. Where will you go
j from here? "Faris, Brussels, Hague,
1 Amsterdam aud St. Petersburg." Kruger
would add nothing to the surprising state
ment of going to St. Petersburg.
Irish Nations'ists Meet.
Chicago, Nov. Nov. 22. —In accord
ance with a custom of many years stand
ing the Irish Nationalists of Chicago will
gather at Central Music hall touight and
with appropriate speeches will cele
brate the anniversary of the executio n
of the Manchester martyrs. A unique
feature of the celebratiou this year is to
be reunion of the only,survivors of the
band of fifteen, kuowu in the history of
the Irish cause as the "Manchester Rea
cue Party." It is thirty years since they
made their daring and successful dash for
the liberation of Col. Thomas J. Kellv,
leader of the Fenian party in Ire
land, and his assistant, Captain
Deasy, from the hands of the
English police while they were being
conveyed to prison in a van. Three of
the party, Allen, Larkin and O'Brien,
died on the scaffold for their participa
tion in the rescue. Many of their com
panions were confined for years in pris
ons, while a few escaped to America.
The six survivors who will
meet in reunion tonight for the first time
since Sept. 18 1867, when they attacked
the prison van and liberated their lead
ers, are R. S. O'Burke of Chicago, Joseph
Keeleyof New York city, Thomas O'Bol
ger of Rochester, Peter Rayan of New
York city, Janies Stonenam of New York
city and James Cahill of Lowell, Mass.
Phi Delta Theta
Louisville, Ky., Nov. 22.—Elaborate
arrangements have been completed for
the biennial convention of the Phi Delta
Theta fraternity which is to be held in
Louisville during the coming week. The
attendance promises to be the largest in
the history of the fraternity, as the soci
ety is very strong in Kentucky, Ohio,
Indiana, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Michigan
and adjacent states. An elaborate pro
gramme of social features has been pre
pared for the entertainment of the visit
ors. The convention will be brought to
a close Wednesday evening with a ban
quet at the Louisville hotel at which the
speakers will include representatives of
many of the leading colleges and uni
versities of the central states.
Miss Drew Presented
New York, Nov. 22.—Miss Louise
Drew, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John
Drew, was presented at a tea this after
noon at the family residence, 44 West
Twenty-first street. The drawing rooms
were profusely decked with flowers,
those sent with congratulations of friends
in the theatrical profession being the
principal ornaments. Mrs. Drew, the
mother of the debutante, introduced her.
Miss Drew is » slender, graceful, dark
haired girl. She bas studied in Dresden
and Boulogne and in the school of Mar
quise de San Carlos in southern Prance.
She appeared once on the' stage with her
father last year as Mrs. Parhury's maid in
"The Tyranny of Tears."
Daughters of the Revolution.
Atlanta, Ga., Nov. 22.—The most no
table convention ever held by the Georgia
society of the Daughters of the American
Revolution began in Atlanta today aud
will continue two days. Craigie house,
in which the opening session was held,
was elaborately decorated with flags and
flowers, and there was <1 large audience.
Mrs. Rnmert Emory Park, state regent,
presided. The reports of the various of
ficers show the society iu Georgia to be
in a flourishing condition. Tonight the
visitors will be entertained at the Kim
ball at a reception to be held under the
auspices of the four Atlanta chapters of
the society.
Creedon aud Raedy.
Baltimore, Md., Nov. 22 —Dan Cree
don, the once great fighter from Australia
is down on the cards to meet Pat Raedy,
the Washington middle-weight, in the
arena of the Eureka Athletic club here
tonight The mill is scheduled for
twenty rounds, hut in 'he opinion of
local ring followers Raedy should be
able to put away his opponeut long be
fore the limit is reached. At their re
spective training quarters today both
men are reported as in fine condition for
the fight.
Fired the Starr.
Vienna, Nov. 22.—Kuryer L. Wolski
of Lemberg, who was responsible for the
sensational dispatches of the czar's ill
ness, today savs the whole kitchen staff
of the imperial palace at Lavida has been
dismissed. The czar has received thou
sands of letters affirming, though he has
recovered this time, be could not escape
his ultimate fate.
MORPHINE
AND DEATH
Dr. Robert Acton, a
Prominent Physician
and Athlete, Dead.
A JEALOUS
WOMAN AND ACID
Nineteen Year Old Girl the Victim
—Woman Arrested But Not
Sorry for the Act.
New York, Nov. 22 —Dr. Robert Ac
ton, a prominent physician and nt one
time a famous Harvard athlete, died this
morning of morphine poieoning. It ie
not known whether it wee euicide.
Lena Scheck t, a servant, aged 19, and
handsome, lies at Bellevue hospital, her
sight partly gone and face badly disfig
ured by acid thrown by Mr. Max Wolff,
who alleged that the girl tried to steal
her husband's affections. Mrs. Wolff has
been arrested. She expressed no regrets.
To Redoee tbc Tax
Washington, Nov. 21. —In executive
session today the republican members of
the ways and meaus committee practic
ally agreed that a reduction shall lie made
in the war taxes.
It is more than probable the druggi ts
will be given considerable relief aud not
so probable that beer will be touched.
Died Laughing.
London, Nov. 22.—Snllivan's death
occurred while he was laughing heartily
over a joke told by a member of hit
household. He had been ill over six
weeks but was thought to be on the
road to recovery.
Begins Work Tomorrow
Chicago, Nov. 22. —After the prelimi
nary meeting last night the National Ir
rigation Congress met for the ninth an
nual session today. Secretary Maxon
reported great progress during t£e past
year. The delegates agreed it was the
duty of the governmeut to redeem the
vast plains of the west to furnish new
THE IDAHO NATIONAL BANK
LEWISTON, IDAHO
W. P. Hurlbut, President. G. W. Thompson, Vice-President
F. M. Hinkley, Cashier
Transacts a General Banking Business. Is prepared to grant its
customsrs the most liberal accommodations consistent with sound
banking. Sella exchange in all parts of the world.
t COLLECTIONS A SPECIALTY
A FRESH SHIPMENT OF
• wvmv wv vwv J
LOWNEY'S
AND
ALLEGRETTI'S
CANDIES
Jl'ST RECEIVED AT THE
Owl Drug Store
WHOLESALH and RETAIL
HOW
ABOUT
4L
PAPERING that
4L
ROOM THIS
FALL. It won't
4L
cost much..........
We have ALL
£
GRADES AND
STYLES OF
4L
WALL PAPER
AT THE RIGHT
4L
PRICES..............
Thatcher
& Kling
DO YOU WANT
SOMETHING
SPECIAL IN
UNDERWEAR?
SOMK THING THAT
YOU CANT FIND
ANYWHBRB..........
IF SO CALL ON US.
WK WILL HAVB IT
MADE FOR YOU....
THIS IS ONE OF
OUR SPECIALTIES
MEULI & LOMAX
Gents' Furnishers.
country for the armies of the unem
ployed. The cultivation of beet sogar
wes claimed to be especially odopted to
reclaiming western arid lands. Capteit -
Chittenden advocated building r eserv oi rs
at headwaters. Tonight General Miles,
Senators Foster and Bard and Teddy
Roosevelt will speek.
Not Badly Hart
• London, Nov. 22.—Lord Roberts to
day reports his accident as slight It
will not keep him from work and ho ex
pects to be about in a few days.
A New Appoinimeit.
Washington, Nov. ta. — The presi
dent today appointed William Meredith
of Chicago chief of the bureau of en
graving and printing.
Composer Dead. •
London, Nov. at— Sir Arthur Sullivan,
Jhe great composer, died this morning of
heart failure at Qnceu Mansion, hie Lon
don residence.
Cora is Higher.
Chicago, Nov. 21. —Before the session
closed corn jumped to 45 cents. It is be
lieved now the price will be put np to 60
or 75 cent»-.
['diamonds
Diamond Jewelry, Rings,
etc. Diamonds in a vari
ety of sices. Call end
Jeweler
sud
Graduate Optician
tl

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