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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 25, 1911, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1911-11-25/ed-1/seq-4/

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The Weather.
For northern Idaho:
tonight and Sunday; warmer tonight.
Rain or snow
BRIEF LOCAL NEWS.
Sheriff C. C. Brown made a business
trip_ to Spokane today.
Herietta M. Peters of Troy, was
in the city yesterday.
H. C. Jones of Pullman, has been
in town today on business.
Austin K. Allen of Lewiston, is a
buiness visitor in the city today.
Archie McArthur, formerly ot Mos
cow, but now of Spokane, is In the
city today.
Raymond Roach, who has been in
town for the past week, left for Lew
iston today.
Miss Harretti E. Werner returned to
yesterday.
Killam,
Werner is a sister of W, H. Enis.
Canada,
Miss
C. G. Windfield, organizer for the
Moose, went to Lewiston today on
business connected with the Moose.
Mrs. A. E. Carlsen of Alberta Lea,
Minn., is visiting at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. T. C. Winther on Asbury
street.
W. H. Enis, who has been in town
for several weeks, returned to Kil
lam, Alberta, Canada, where lie has
a homestead.
The ladies of the Presbyterian
church announce that they will hold
their cooked-food, candy and fancy
work sale on December 8 and 9.
Marriage licenses were issued to
day to Paul P. Massie of Pouisen,
Mont., and Ida Stevens of this city,
and Chas. Meyor of San Francisco and
Zeita Henman of Avon.
Pleasantly Entertained
Miss Clarissa Ayer was hostess to
the G. T. C. club at her homç on
North Main street, at 2:30 yesterday
afternoon. After the regular business
of the club the afternoon was spent
in music and singing, after which a
dainty two-course luncheon
served. The first course consisting of
cheese waifers and coffee, and the
second of cake and fruit jelio desert.
was
First Baptist Church.
Corner First and Jackson streets.
David B. Hand, pastor; residence 509
East First street; Phone 92-Y.
10:00 a. m., Bible School.
11:15 a. m., Morning Worship, ser
mon by pastor, "International Peace."
3:00 p. m., Junior Union.
6:30 p, m., B. Y. P. U.
7:30 p. m., Evening Worship, ser
mon by the pastor, "The Most Popular
Sin in the World."
Methodist Episcopal Church.
Robert Warner, pastor, Phone 16-R.
Sunday School, 10 a. m., W. F. Mor
gareidge, superintendent.
Miorning sermon, 11 o'clock, sub
ject, "The Great Call."
Evening sermon, 7:30 o'clock, sub
ject, "The Joy of the Redeemed."
Morning anthem, "Hark, the Song','
(Heyser).
Evening anthem, "The Lord is
Great" (Herbert).
Dr. Boyd director of the'chorus
choir.
Mrs. Wilford Herrington presides
at the pipe organ.
Epworth League Sunday evening at
6:30.
Prayer Meeting, Thursday evening at
7:30 o'clock.
A cordial welcome to all services.
Boxing Illegal.
NEW YORK, Nov. 25.—Boxing in
theatres is illegal, according to a
ruling just made by the New York
AHiletic commission. The law holds
that boxing bouts can be held only
in arenas of chartered athletic clubs
which have a lease of at least one
year on their quarters.
[
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS
Office Furniture for Sale—Hunter
& Payne are offering for sale at a
bargain, the furniture and fixtures of
the United States court rooms, includ
ing roll top desks, tables, chairs, lin
oleum, stoves, etc. For particulars, in
quire at the office of Wm. Hunter or
the First National Bank.
35tf
For Sale—-Dressed young ducks for
Thanksgiving. Mrs. Lee Humphrey,
Phone 9158.
48-4
For Sale—An Underwood typewriter.
Good as new. Veatch Realty compa
48tf
ny.
Lost—A small white embroidered
apron between David & Ely's store
and Hagan & Cushing's. Return to
Mrs. O. W. Beardsley, corner of Wash
ington and A streets, and receive re
ward.
50tf
Lost—A cluster of six dark brown
curls streaked with gray,
please leave same at this office and re
ceive reward.
Finder
olpd
TRY TO DROWN THE
SOPHOMORES OUT
In attempting to break up the st:s
sion of the High School Sophomore
Literary society last night, some young
miscreants entered the high school
building, and unreeling the fire hose,
turned on the water, and partially
flooded the floor below where the ex
ercises were being held. The guilty
parties escaped by means of the fire
escape.
The evening was closed with games
CRYSTAL THEATRE
All Next Week
JUST LIKE
HOME
JUST LIKE
HOME
Vin Moore Stock
Company
PRICES
POPULAR
Beat Wife Who Wore High Heels
Free.
-Set
WILKESBARRE. Nov. 25.—"High
heels are unnecessary, ridiculous and
dangerous," exclaimed Justice and
Alderman John F. Donohue of this city,
when Mrs. William Watson, a former
resident of this place, came ail the
way from New Jersey to prosecute her
husband for abusing her. The husband
was more than' meek in the presence
of the austere magistrate, noted for
handling wife beaters.
"I have to beat my better half," he
.said, "to keep her from running to
stories to buy everything new that
A TEA SET
Something New and Neat —
Something you should have in your home —
Something to use every day and on holidays—
Within the Reach of All —
Prices From $6.00 Up —
Plain or Fancy Patterns —
See them in our window
FRANK KELLY
THE JEWELER
WONDERFUL APPETITE
OF MODERN WOMEN
NEW YORK, Nov. 25.—At the meet
ing of the State Federation of Wom
en's Clubs in New York some views
were discussed that will prove divert
ing to clubwomen everywhere and to
others. Mrs. E. B. Kidder proved the
star talker and "kidder." Mrs. Win
ifred Harper Cooley was another stel
lar attraction.
'New York city," said Mrs. Cooley,
"is the most vicious and immoral in
tills country, because its people live
in restaurants and delicatessens.
Health, whether private or public, de
pends on food. Morality depends on
food. When we are hungry and ill
nourished we see things and are not
responsible, mentally or morally.
Hamlet undoubtedly needed a square
meal. The gaunt, starving man .will
steal without compunction, and some
times commit murder. Many a drunk
ard is made so by sour bread."
Having completed the indictment,
Mrs. Cooley cheerfully proceeded to
lay the onus on her sex as guardians
of morals indifferent to food adulter
ation. She proceeded:
"The quantity of food each indiv
idual eats is surprising. We literally
shovel tons of material into our deli
cate stomachs. In a lifetime of 70
years a woman eats 30 oxen, 100 cows,
200 sheep, 50 pigs, 30,000 oysters, 21.
000 eggs, 414 tons of bread, etc.
"The quality, therefore, ought to be
looked into. Yet we tranquilly de
vour food colored with coal tar dyes
and preserved with chemicals and
poisons. We buy and vie eat these
daily."
Just for Lunch Appetizers.
Mrs. Cooley then told them how
frequently made from
catsup
floor sweepings and other appetizing
ingredients and ran through the list
was
of liquid eggs and bacteria haunted
and dancing, which followed the box
supper at the end of the program.
The program was:
Piano solo
Dialogue, Signe Eggan, Bertha Taylor,
Jennie Peterson, and Katherine
Frantz.
Song
Dialogue, Edna Gribble, Orville Sharp,
Walter Sandelier.
Dialogue. Ernest Pole. Roy Wright,
Forreset Taylor.
Vesta Cornwall
Tile Society
comes out. Her latest craze is high
heels."
"The French high heel is an out
rage; nothing short of barbarous,"
declared the alderman. Donohue has
decided other important questions of
women's attire. He has given his
opinion on "rats," "hobble skirts'' and
"facial adornments." The case was
dismissed.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 25.—Viscount
Chinda, now representing Japan at the
court in Berlin, has been appointed
Japanese ambassador to the United
States, according -to a state depart
ment bulletin just issued.
milk and poisoned candy till organ
ized womanhood qualied.
"Food adulteration is as old as his
tory," she said,
and greed.
bread and wine were adulte 'ated, and
laws passed against this. Hi Holland,
in the middle ages, a man was buried
alive for a harmless adulteration of a
drug. In Puritan New England they
"It is born of graft
In Rome before Christ
used to water their milk and sand
their sugar gefore going to ,
She "Kids" the Men.
Mrs. Kidder was contrasting "Ev
eryman" and "Everywoman" .in Mrs.
Ruth Litt's hour on drama, when she
called attention to the many plays
which personified the Deity on the
stage. "The Third Floor Back" she
styled "The Ecclesiastical Jollier and
His Emotional Ten Pins." She was so
rapturously recalled at the close of
her address that she broke the rule
against encores.
"I am so delighted to see the men
here," she said, looking out over the
big audience. "We women admire the
men."
iraynr."
I
All of them iaughted and applauded.
"Oh, yes we do. Just as mach as
the men admire themselves"—here
the shouts grew louder—"and human
admiration," concluded Mrs. Kidder
demurely, "can go no farther."
Happy Mr. Kidder.
An aside which did not appear in
any announcement of Mrs. Kidder's
work for the "Fed"
was whispered
yesterday in the corridor,
that her constant attendance at the
convention would make her husband
neglect his lonely luncheon (in
apartment hotel), Mrs. Kidder arouse
on Sunday morning early and baked
chicken and pies enough to feed sev
eral adults for a week. In the four
days that have elapsed, Mr. Kidder |
Fearing
an
has emptied the larder, and It is as
serted on credible authority that his
.weight lias increased 15 pounds.
Couldn't Slop Gum Chewing.
"Do you see the delegate over
there in the purple scarf?" one wom
an asked an usher. "Well, she's
chewing gum and I want you to
speak to her. There's no dignity
to it."
"Madam," responded the usher, "I
have ordered these women to take
off their hats and most of them have
been pretty civil about it. I have
ordered them to stop talking and one
of them nearly shook the life out of
me. But, ask a New York woman to
stop chewing gum! Not on your— I
mean my courage has its limits."
SAYS WOMEN
MUST HUSTLE
That the woman who stays at home
by her own fireside in this day and
age is unmoral, was the startling
statement made by Professor Charles
Zuebiin a few days ago, an account of
which appears in the Philadelphia
Tribune.
"So long as immorality flaunts it
self on every side, vice and -disease
hold their grip on the social fabric
and corruption is rampant in our city
halls and legislative chambers, a wom
an cannot remain true to her moth
erhood and stay secluded in the
home."
This was the substance of a start
ling address made by Professor
Charles Zuebiin, formerly professor of
sociology at the University of Chicago,
before the University Extension socie
ty in Witherspoon hall a few days
ago, and several hundred women ap
plauded vigorously,
others, however, showed their disap
proval by keeping silent. Further on
he said:
Women Must Get Out and Hustle.
"No woman in America can stay at
home and be a good mother. The
days when women could sit by the
heartstone and leave the direction of
political and social progress to men
have passed. The quicker women real
A number of
ize this the better for themselves, their
families and the country.
"The 'old-fashioned' woman is not
only out of place in the world today,
but is immoral. It is argued that a
mother belongs to her children, and
her place is by their side in the home.
She does belong to the children. But
how is she to safeguard their water,
milk and food supply if she never
leaves the fireside?
"Not even the most rabid anti-suf
fragist dares to say that women lack
sufficient intelligence to vote. Nearly
all our civic leagues are manned by
women. They are doing the work left
undone by men. They are devoting
more time and thought to- civic and
social problems than men. In fact,
the political platforms drawn up by
the National Federation of Women's
clubs are 20 years ahead of anything
ever proposed by the great parties."
High School Work a Farce.
In speaking of the school systems
of the country he said:
"The work performed by our high
schools is farcical.
Students are
turned out of them with only ru
diments of culture and totally unfit
for any useful work. Unless our
school soon begin to give up students
trained to use their hands, eyes and
mind in inventive or creative work,
and with a sound, rounded and com
plete culture, America will never be
able to complete successfully with Ger
many for the trade of the world.
"One of the greatest sources
waste of human energy in America is
the effort to fit square pegs in round
of
Going
Home
FOR CHRISTMAS?
55*
•nir
The Canadian Pacific (Soo
Spokane Route) offers you
the very best service and low
est rates from the Inland Em
pire to .all Eastern and South
ern cities. Through Electric
lighted Compartment, Obser
vation, Library, Standard and
Tourist Sleepers from Colfax
to Minneapolis at 8:05 a. m.,
making direct connection for
Chicago and all points East
and South.
We will also be pleased to
name you rates to all points
in Europe via ANY steam
ship line you wish on hearing
from you.
information,
further
call on your local O.-W. R.
& N. and S. & I. E. agents, or
write
For
M. E. MALONE, T. J. WALL,
Trav. Pass. Agt.
14 Wall St., Spokane.
Gen. Agt.
/

*
Which
7
«
6 pair guaranteed
6 months.
Iron-Clad Hosiery— Everwear Hosiery
Two famous brands guaranteed to out last any other make of the
same weights. The texture is something to consider —and
another is the way they fit around the ankles. Join the army of
users and have Hosiery satisfaction
25c a Pair
For Christmas Presents
$1.50 a Box
i i
Get a Bradley or
Phoenix Muffler
Suitable for Men or Women
Mercerized Cotton at . .35c
Mixtures at. . . 50c and 75c
$1.00 to $3.00
P
Silk at . .
iZ&f
It...'
David & Ely Co., Ltd
"MOSCOW'S GREATEST STORE"
holes. Boys and girls are constantly
getting into wrong occupations,
job is not the goal of life, but a right
job is. We must have vocational bu
reaus as well as employment bureaus."
A
Knocks Pacific Coal.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 25.—The an
nual report of Secretary of the Navy
Meyer will announce that coal mined
in the Pacific coast states is not suit
able for battleship use. Alaskan coal,
the report will say, possesses the ne
cessary qualities however.
Recently coal tests were held aboard
several warships of the Pacific fleet
and it was then said that Pacific coal
was not up to standard.
Seattle Nears Normal.
SEATTLE, Nov. 25. — Paralyzed
since Sunday by the floods, conditions
are once more becoming normal with
the subsidence of the swoolen
streams.
Railroad traffic at a standstill for
two days, is being resumed as is in
tern rban traffic between this city, Ta
coma and Everett.
It will be several days yet before
the Chicago, Milwaukee railroad will
open again on its own lines, as they
suffered severely. The trains mean
while are being routed over the North
ern Pacific tracks as far as Easton.
Ranchers are returning to the
homes. Damage in this vicinity has
exceeded $100,000 to crops and ranch
ers alone.
Woman Laughs in Highwayman's
Face.
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 25.—Laughing
in the face of a masked highwayman
who entered the restaurant and point
ed a loaded revolver at her, Mrs. Mabel
Penersder, the cashier calmly declin
ed to hand over the contents of the
cash register.
When the man climbed over the
LOW FARES VIA
INLAND
ELECTRIC v
TO THE
FOURTH NATIONAL
APPLE SHOW
ENAKOPS GRAND JUBILEE
( OUNTRY LIFE CONGRESS
SPOKANE, NOVENBER 23-30
FARE AND A THIRD
Round trip from all Inland points good Nov.
C 22-28 Inclusive, return limit Dec. 2.
ASK INLAND AGENT.
SUBSCRIBE FOR
THE DAILY
Star-Mirror
iron railing and helped himself she
realized that it was not a practical
joke, as she had thought.
"I just kept on laughing then," she
said, "because I did not know what
else to do."
ti
Why I Buy
Units
i ?
No. 12
How much a man leaves
his family is not so impor
tant as what he leaves. I
might leave my family a
business or some troublesome
investments that cost me ten
or twenty thousand dollars
which under their manage
ment would be worth less and
earn less income, than may
be some three or five thous
and dollar investment free
from trouble, like Units of
Business Property. I'd be
better fixed today if my
father had left us Units in
stead of the investments he
did leave T would have pre
ferred a business property
legacy—my children will get
one, for I am selling one
thing after another as fast as
I can and buying Units."
"There'll be no sacrifice
sales necessary to divide up
tile property I leave, for I'll
simply will so many Units to
my wife, so many to son John
and daughter Mary. And I
know for sure that, what t
pay $1,000 for today will be
worth no less than $1,000 to
them then, indeed the Units
will increase in value and be
worth more then than now."
In this series of advertise
ments we give the answers
some of our Unit Owners
have made to the abrupt
question: "Why do you buy
Units?"
Of what will your estate
consist? Learn all about
Units.
»
T rustee
h
Co
Of Spokane
E. Kauffman, Agent, Moscow
n
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722 RIVERSIDE AVE,.
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