OCR Interpretation


The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 27, 1911, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1911-11-27/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

t
THE DAILY STAR-MIRROR
VOLUME I.
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1911
NUMBER 52
NANKING IS FALLING AND THE VICEROY FLEES
Imperialist Leader Is Killed Trying To
Retake Guns=Carnage Is
Fearful.
SHANGHAI, Nov. 27—Riddled with
shells from two sides and the fire from
the rebel warships on the third, with a
great part of the city in rains and the
rebels already entrenched on the out
skirts, the fall of Nanking is expected
momentarily.
Convinced that the cause is lost, the
Viceroy and the Tartar General com
manding the Imperialists have fled and
taken refuge in a Japanese warship.
Certain that massacre will be their
fate when the city falls, the Mauchus
arc fighting desperately on Tiger Hill.
The carnage is fearful. It is estimated
that 3000 Imperialists and 500 rebels
are already dead.
à
GREY FLAYS GERMANY;
OPEN QUARREL LIKELY
LONDON, Nov. 27.—Notice to the
world that England is prepared to
maintain her present alliances and pol
icies whether Germany likes it or not
was heard in the house of commons
Saturday night when Sir Edward
Grey, minister of foreign affairs in
speaking reiterated the defiance of
Chancellor Lloyd-George to Germany
which recently set all Europe in fear
of an immediate war.
Sir Edward Grey, in making his long
heralded speech in the house of com
mons regarding Morrocco, admitted
that French, English and German re
lations were "still seriously dedicate."
The address was sensational,
practically charged Germany with act
ing in bad faith, in the entire embri
glio. It is conceded that this speech
will reopen the breech between Eng
land and Germany.
It
ITALIANS CONTROL
SACRED COLLEGE
ROME, Nov. 27.—Just prior to the
consistory meeting which ratified his
recent selection of IS cardinals, Pojie
Pius announced that a nineteenth
name had in secret oeen selected and
this also was ratified.
Among the elect are Cardinals Des
ignate Farley, O'Connell and Falconio,
of the United States.
This brings the total of the sacred
college to 64 and as the Italians have
a slight majority, it is practically cer
tain that the next pope will be an Ital
ian.
Addressing the consistory, the pope
characterized the Masonic order as a
"malevolent sect hating God and
Christian." He closed his address by
praying that disavowal might be
averted from the church in Spain
where a .movement for the division of
the church and state is progressing.
The new cardinals will be formally
invested with the red hat on November
30.
Cardinal Farley's title will be Bishop
of Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, Cardi
nal O'Connell's, Bishop of San Callisot
Church, and Cardinal Falconio's Bish
op of Santa Maria in Aracoeli.
The pope also reviewed the past
years in the church, referring incident
ally to "the immunity with which the
Protestant sects opposed the church
openly in Rome."
Referring to modernism and natural
ism, the pope found comfort in the
Catholic world's increasing love for
the church and the Euchardist and
praised the Eucharistic congresses at
Cologne, Montreal, London and Mad
rid recently.
It is reported that General Wong,
the Imperialist leader, was killed while
trying to lead his force outside the
wall in an effort to recapture lost
guns. The rebels have repeatedly
charged the gates. The lire from the
Imperialist batteries on Lion Hill has
ceased.
Jap Troops to Aid.
TOKIO, Nov. 27.—Seven
Japanese troops are under orders to
day to leave Nagoya Immediately for
Pekin, and Tien Tsin to reinforce the
legation garrisons there, conforming
with a decision of the foreign diplo
mats at Pekin.
hundred
The galleries were jamned. At the
onset Lord Grey intimated that Herr
Kinderlin-Waechter, the German for
eign minister, hadn't disclosed the sit
uation fully and frankly. He said
that Germany's action in sending war
ships to Morrocco when the German
subjects there were safe, was inde
fensible and apparently reopened
the entire subject of the powers' re
spective rights in Morrocco which
every one else had thought was set
tled by the treaty of Algeciras.
Sid Edward Grey, as foreign minis
ter conducted the negotiations Eng
land. He said that he told the Ger
man ambassador that he didn't con
sider the Kaiser's attitude disinterest
ed and added that unless England was
included as a party in the new set
tlement Great Britian would consider
the old treaty abrogated and the en
tire question reopened.
I. W. W.'S STILL
PLAN TO FIGHT
Nov. 27.—Following
the refusal of the city authorities to
allow the I. W. W.s to return to the
city, despite their promise to abide
by the street speaking ordinance, it is
expected that the I. W. W.s will begin
their campaign with renewed vigor in
an effort to harass citizens into re
pealing the ordinance. The citizens are
determined to run the town and they
ABERDEEN,
will use every effort to keep the in
dustrialists out.
FOREST FIRES
THREATEN BEAUTY
I SANTA MONICA, Nov. 27.—A fire
I which 600 men can't conquer has al
ready disolated the natural beauty
spots of southern California, Temescal
and Tipango canyons in the Santa
I Monica mountains and is now eating
its way toward the famous Topango
tavern. It seems certain that the prop
erty loss will exceed a million dollars.
Rain is about the only thing to stop
the damage.
King George at Aden.
ADEN, Nov. 27.—King George ar
rived here today enroute to the Indian
Durbar. The royal party was escorted
by six cruisers. They landed here.
The journey down the Red sea was
uneventful though several times Turk
ish and Italian scout warships were
sighted. Aden is the last fortified place
between Egypt and Bombay.
Topers Lose Tlielr Votes.
EVANSVILLE, Ind., Nov. 27.—Judge
John L. Bretz of the Pike county cir
cuit court at Petersberg is trying a
new cure for drunkenness. In the
last week three "habituais" were ar
raigned before him, and in addition
to fining them heavily, he disfranchised
them for one year.
Petersberg is a dry town, but it is
said there are several "blind tigers"
there, and Judge Bretz has found out
that fining the average man for drunk
enness does not keep him out of court
and he will try his new plan for
awhile.
Politicians do not look with favor
upon the disfranchisement for a year
of this class of voters, as it will pre
vent them voting at the fall election
in 1912.
MOTOR CAR CLASSIC
IS RUN AT SAVANNAH
SAVANNAH, Nov. 27.—The Vander
bilt cup race, the American Classic of
289 miles distance, started at 11:45
with Grant in a Lozier car leading.
Special train for two days have been
pouring people in here. The 17-mile
course is in splendid shape and the
day fine. This is the first time the
big cup race has been run here, the
six previous contests having been
held on Long Island. State troops
patrol the course.
Ralph Mulford, driving the Lozier
car, won the Vande'rbilt cup race to
day. His time was three hours and
fifty-six minutes.
Ralph Da Palma, in a Mercedes was
second, just two minutes and eleven
seconds behind.
Mulford took the lead in the race
GOVERNOR'S SPECIAL
STARTS ON LONG TRIP
-Governors of
ST, PAUL, Nov. 27.
ten states are here today and leave to
night on the Governor's Special for
a 4000-mile eastern tour.
An 11-car train will carry the gov
ernors and will depart, from St. Paul
at 9 o'clock tonight for a 20-day trip
to 21 cities of the east and middle
west, the first time in the history of
the country such an enterprise has
been undertaken.
Nearly 4000 miles will be covered by
the special from the hour of its de
parture until its return to St. Paul,
December 18. The cities where the
special will stop have an aggregate
population of more than 12,500,000 per
sons.
WILL BLOCKADE
THE DARDENELLES
CONSTANTINOPLE, Nov. 27.—The
ministers of war and marine are en
roule to the Dardanelles today follow
ing a report that the Italian fleet has
been sighted in the sea of Marmera
only a mile and a half from Darda
nelles. A blockade will be establish
ed immediately. It is believed there
will be an engagement between the
Turkish and Italian fleets soon.
Pass Lie in Court.
REDWOOD CITY, Cal., Nov. 27.—
The lie was passed in court today
when Frederick Fenwick, a millionaire
lumberman took the stand in the
Moore divorce case and made a
sweeping denial of all the charges
against him by Moore.
Mrs. Moore whom Moore said was
intimate with Fenwick was not pres
ent. She is nearly in a state of col
lapse.
Sweet Baby Wins Legacy.
GUTHRIE, Ok., Nov. 27.—Ruth Pow
ers, 14 years old, daughter of the Rev.
H. W. Powers of Oklahoma City, was
notified today by attorneys of College
City, Coluga county, Colorado, that
she is to receive a legacy amounting
to many thousand dollars, according
to the terms of the will of I. T. Botts,
who died recently at his California
home at the age of 84.
Botts was one of the '49ers of pion
eer California days and amassed a
fortune. Thirteen years ago Mr, and
Mrs. Powers lived at College City,
where the father was pastor of the
First Christian church. Their daugh
ter was but 2 years at that time and
she so impressed the aged Californian
with her baby ways that he never for
got her.
and maintained it throughout. Four
racers withdrew owing to trouble.
Mulford covered the 289 miles with an
average speed ,of 74.9 miles an hour,
which is a world's record. There were
thirteen starters.
Mercer Wins Trophy.
SAVANNAH, Ga„ Nov. 27.—Driver
Hughes in a Mercer car won the Sa
vannah trophy race, one of the fea
tures of the auto racing meet here.
Heinman in a Marmon car was second
and Mlkrent in a Marmon car was
third. The time was 3 hours, 15 min
utes and 37 seconds and the average
speed was 68 V 2 miles per hour for a
distance of 222 miles.
There were
seven starters. Witt, driving an E. M.
F.-Studehaker, won the Tideman cup.
"Buy at Home" the Slogan.
home industry'
The "patronize
spirit of the west has been one of the
considerations that has urged the
western development organizations to
send this excursion to the eastern
states, seeking the best points at
which the west may buy its goods,
since it is felt that the opening of
the Panama canal is apt to make
European manufacturers close compe
titors of all American industries.
Elaborate arrangements have been
made to entertain the men making up
the party. The train will be met upon
entering a state by the governor of
that state and by other prominent
men. They will accompany the train
to the border line and turn it over to
the governor of the next state.
JUDGES CUT THE
HARVESTER FINE
JEFFERSON CITY, Nov. 27.—The
International Harvester company
which was ousted from the state re
cently and fined $50,000, as a trust,
was given a $25,000 reduction today in
a modified decision of the state su
preme court. Judges Graves and
Woodson dissented at the reduction.
The court also denied the ouster
asked for by Governor Hadley when he
was attorney general which was in
tended to dissolve the merger of the
Gould railroad systems in Missouri.
After Illegal Voters.
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 27-.—Detective
Brown of the district attorney's of
fice today completed the investigation
of the first fifty names to be proceeded
against for illegal registration in the
hot municipal election to be held hero
December 5 and 6 and placed the
data in the hands of Deputy District
Attorney Hannah who will issue
warrants for their arrest immediately,
OUTLINES PLAN OF
THE M'NAMARA TRIAL
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 27.—A tire
some examination of talesmen to fill
the vacant three seats, occupied the
most of the time in the McNamara
trial today.
Mystery still surrounds the visit to
Washington of Federal District At
torney McCormick, although it is
known that the visit concerns the Mc
Namara trial, none of those concern
ed will discuss it. It is expected that
Wickersham wanted to know if there
was any need of the so called Indian
apolis evidence being transferred
here.
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 27.—With
eight jurors sworn and the jury gel
ing process somewhat simplified, in
quiry as to what will be heard when
evidence is introduced in the McNa
mara case brought forth today in a
general way from District Attorney
J. D. Fredericks an outline of how the
state will present its side of the con
troversy over the destruction of the
Los Angeles Times building in Octo
ber, 1910,
After the opening statement by the
district attorney when the jury is
completed, maps and diagrams will be
shown of the building that was blown
up. A number of eye witnesses will
be summoned to describe what they
saw. These will include not only em
ployes who were in the building at the
time of the disaster but those who saw
the explosion and fire from outside.
Then will come, according to the dis
trict attorney, proof of the death of
Chas. J. Haggerty, a machinist, for
whose murder James B. McNamara is
now on trial. Haggerty's body was
found in the basement near a place
in "Ink alley" where it is claimed an
explosive was feloniously placed.
Testimony to show that Haggerty
was killed instantly by the force of
the explosion and not by fire then will
SAYS THAT ROOSEVELT
STARTED SOMETHING
WASHINGTON, Nov. 27.—Govern
ment officials regard the inspired
statement in the Philadelphia North
American that Roosevelt finally re
fuses to run again in 1912 as certain
UNIDENTIFIED BODY
IS FOUND NEAR VIOLA
The body of an unidentified man was*
discovered about 2:00 o'clock Sunday
afternoon in some bushes about two
miles east of Viola.
There was nothing left but the glar
ing skeleton, with its complement of
rags which had once been clothes. No
papers were found by which identifica
tion could be made.
The body is believed to have lain,
hidden In the bushes since last Pebru
ary.
Coroner L. B. McCartor and Sheriff
Brown were summoned and made an
investigation, bringing the body with
them to Moscow this afternoon.
Special Session is Not Expensive.
TACOMA, Nov. 27.—Although there
is considerable doubt as to whether
Governor Hay will call a special ses
sion of the legislature to enact a pres
idential primary law, the newly or
ganized Progresive League has de
dared itself solidly for it. The club
has also come out for Senator Robert
M. La Follette of Wisconsin. Accord
ing to figures submitted by Chief
be brought forth, as it was Haggerty's
proximity to the alleged origin of the
explosion that induced the state to
choose for trial from nineteen indict
ments the one for the murder of Hag
gerty.
Testimony of experts on explosives
will be produced thereupon to indicate
that dynamite wrecked the building.
Though the state has several hundred
witnesses, many of them will be dis
posed of in a few minutes.
The defense thus far has not in
dicated what its manner of refutation
will be. The attorneys claim to have
several methods at their disposal and
though they will indulge in exhaustive
cross examinations, the main line of
defense will not become visible until
after the state has rested its case.
Combatting the dynamite theory by
expert testimony as well as by wit
nesses who will allege that they smell
ed gas in the vicinity of the building,
already has been admitted by the de
fense as a central feature in its fu
ture argument.
Examination of talesmen thus far
likewise has revealed that the defense
will insist on the theory that the Times
was destroyed by accident and that no
felony therefore was committed.
Calculations from the present pro
gress of the trial place the time for
the taking of evidence at the middle of
December.
Though only four more jurors are
needed to fill the box, the time for tak
ing evidence may be postponed some
what by the choosing of one or two
alternate jurors to replace any who
may become physically unable to serve
during the course of the trial. Unless
Juror J. H. Coke is excused before long
it is expected an alternate will be
necessary for him as his physician is
reported to have said he could not
stand the confinement.
of precipitating a big fight between
the conservatives and radicals at the
national republican convention. The
progressives are elated as that will
give them bigger chances of winning
all around with La Follette.
-
Clerk of the Legislature Loren Grin
stead, the cost of a special session
would be approximately $10,000 and
not $60,000 as opponents of the move
ment assert.
PRIMARY IS UP
TO LEGISLATURE
SACRAMENTO, Cal,, Nov. 27.—The
opening of the special session of the
legislature this afternoon marked the
beginning of the final removal of the
obstructions to progressive legisla
tion started when the progressives won
the last general election. It is believ
ed certain that the presidential prefer
ence primary law will be enacted to
that the people can have a popular vote
on the presidential nominations next
May. It will probably be an admin
istrative measure as the
strongly favors the plan.
governor

xml | txt