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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 05, 1918, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
VOLUME VIII
Ä08COW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1918
NUMBER 7
AMERICANS THREATEN MAIN HUN RAIL LINES
On the western front the allies are advancing and the Huns
are retiring,
burning French cities, villages and farms in their retreat. France has issued
a warning to Germany that for every building destroyed Germany will
in kind and that the German people and the German officers
this destruction will be held criminally and financially
many has notified the United States that she will
soldier captured with
pay
who order
responsible. . Ger
execute every American
a shot gun in his possession and Secretary Lansing
bas replied that America, not Germany,, is taking prisoners and that for
every American executed several Germans will pay a like penalty,
cations are that the allies will soon be on German soil when the burning and
destruction of property will be carried on by the allies.
King Ferdinand, of Bulgaria, has abdicated in favor of Crown Prince
Doris, thus solving a problem that the allies have been considering, whether
•to depose Ferdinand or keep him under control.
Indi
British, French, American and Belgian troops are making rapid advance
on the western front and the Americans are said to be within 18 miles of
the main railroad system connecting Germany with the west front, and
Germany is hurrying reinforcements there to try to hold the line until her
army and stores can be removed from Belgium,
odds favor the Americans.
It is a race in which the
If they take this line a large portion of Ger
many's army and supplies in Belgium will be cut off and taken by the
Americans.
Despite 100,000 cases of Spanish influenza in cantonments of the American
«rmy at home, more than a quarter of a million were sent across in Sep
tember and the shipments will continue at the rate of 200,000 per month.
The telegraphic and cable reports received today follow:
Americans Close to Germany's Greatest Railway Line.
"WASHINGTON.—The American advance north west of Verdun now threat
ens the greatest single line of communication, between Germany and the
west front, General March, chief of staff, said today'.
General Pershing's men are now within 18 miles of this great artery.
The Germans have thrown into this sector many divisions of reeinforce
metits but despite this the Americans have pushed forward until they
f»ce the German Kriemsild line of defense.
French Have Crossed Aisne Canal.
PARIS.— (Official.)—Under French and American pressure in Champagne
the Germans retired on their left flank and have given up territory of great
value.
West of Suippe the French have reached the heights southeast of Moron
French and American troops gained further ground north of Blanc
Mont in the direction of the river *Arnes.
Along the Aisne canal in the Rheims region the French are pressing the
Germans hard and have crossed the Aisne canal at several points and have
reached the outskirts of Bermedicourt, east of the canal.
Americans Wipe Out Entire German Party.
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMY IN FRANCE.—(By Associated Press.)—
After 40 minutes barrage the Germans last night attempted to raid the
American lines east of Gerardmer in Lorraine, with a strong party. The
attack proved a total failure.
1
now
1
villers.
There were 60 men in the German party, every member of it who reached
the American lines was either killed or captured. Five wounded prisoners
were taken.
Americans Advance One Mile This Morning.
PARIS.—(Official.)—Under French and American pressurs in Champagne
Meuse and Argonne on an extended front. The American advance at some
points reached more than a mile and several villages were taken.
Influenza Has Not Stopped Soldier Shipments.
WASHINGTON.—Despite Spanish influenza epidemic the embarkation of
American troops is being continued at the rate of over 200,000 monthly,
General March, chief of staff, announced today.
Total embarkations have passed the 1,850,000 mark. September shipments
^exceeded a quarter of a million although influenza cases in camps at home
exceeded 100,000.
Allies Take Prensy From Austrians.
PARIS.—Allied forces in Serbia came in contact with Austro-Hungarian
troops near Vranje, in Serbia. The Serbians operating against the Austrians
took Prensy, a very important town, on Thursday.
British Took 800 Prisoners Yesterday.
LONDON.—(Official.)—In the region north of St. Quentin British troops
made substantial progress yesterday, east of Bureaoir and north of Catelet.
Eight hundred German prisoners were captured in this sector. The British
line northwest of Le Catelet was advanced slightly during the night.
French Take Prisoners and Cannon.
LONDON.—The French official statement dealing with operations around
St. Quentin says: "We have taken Chardon-Vert, southwest of Sequehart
and many fortified woods. We captured JVTorocourt, where wa took four
^Rindred prisoners and four cannon.
King Ferdinand, Bulgaria, Abdicates.
COPENHAGEN.—The official correspondence bureau has given out a dis
patch from Sofia, dated Friday, stating that King Ferdinand of Bulgaria
abdicated Thursday in favor of Crown Prince Doris and that the new king
has already assumed office.
Germans Apply Torch to More French Towns.
WITH THE BRITISH ARMY IN FRANCE.—Flames are shooting up from
the city of Duoai. More fires have been started in Cambrai. The Germans
• are also applying the torch to many villages in the Cambrai area.
Americans Have Reached Arnes River Lines.
FRENCH HEADQUARTERS.-—In the eastern Champagne district the
Germans are falling back on the lineof the Arnes river. This line has been
reached by the American forces who have taken Stetinne-A-Ames.
Kaiser Bill Tries Cabinet Making.
COPENHAGEN.— Dr. W. F. Solf, German colonial secretary, has been ap
pointed to the German imperial foreign secretaryship.
Billion of Bonds Sold.
WASHINGTON.—One billion dollars have been subscribed to the fourth
Liberty loan, up to Friday night, according to treasury reports.
American Casualties 532.
There are 632 names in the American army casualty lists issued for today.
The list issued for morning papers contains 270 names. It follows:
Killed in action, 56; missing in action, 33; wounded severely, 157; died
from wounds, 1 8;died of disease, 6; died from aeroplane accident, 1; total, 270.
Afternoon List.—Killed in action, 67; missing in action, 33; wounded se
verely, 146; died of wounds, 13; died of accident and other causes, 7; died
of disease, 6; total, 262.
Five Idaho Boys in Casualty Lists.
The names of five Idaho soldiers appear in today's casualty lists. Four
of these were killed in action or died of wounds and one is reported missing
in action. They are:
Killed in action—John Thompson, Roxburg; Donald M. Sprinkle, of Weiser;
and David T. Davis, of Jerome. Died from wounds—Lloyd L, Shaw, of
Salmon. Missing in action—Harry C. Allbery, of St. Maries, Idaho.
SHELL FACTORY EXPLOSION
NEW YORK.—After 18 hours of terror dozens of towns in northern New
Jersey are in a shattered condition in consequence of the munitions disaster.
The explosion from unknown causes of the $18,000,000 shell making plant of
T. A. Gillespie at Morgan, N. J., scattered fire brands among tons of trini
trotolul.
Unofficial estimates palced the dead at 137. The night shift was known
to number 2000 persons.
Firemen are unable to get within two miles of the plant because of con
stant explosions.
LIBERTY LOAN BONO
SALES ARE SLOW
LATAH COUNTY HAS ONLY SUB
SCRIBED $227,200 OF HER
QUOTA OF $800,000
The heavy rain today kept many
country people from coming ot town
and the sale of Liberty loan bonds
fell far below what was expected. This
being Saturday it was hoped that
scores of farmers would come in and
take their quotas but fewer farm
people were in town today than dur
ing any day of the week.
The sale of bonds is going forward
slowly. The banks have not checked
up all of their sales even to last night.
The latest available figures on the
county are $227,200 for the county,
which includes Moscow subscriptions
totaling 226,360. Few large sales
have been reported for today, but
many laborers and salaried persons
have taken small amounts. Many
precincts have made no reports yet
and several towns have not been
heard from. Beginning Monday a
hard drive to raise the county's quota
of $800,000 will be started with a
view to getting the entire quota be
fore October 16. No towns have re
ported being "over the top" yet.
The list of subscribers with amounts
taken as furnished by the committee
since the last list
was pub
lished, follows:
Williamson, N. .
Armbruster, E. J.
Walker, E. A.
Wahlgemuth, Julius ...
Weigand, L. M.
Willis, Belle .
Almquist, Ed .
Chaney, Ralph .
Mix, Frank M.
Ainslee, Mrs. L. H.
Deuel, Fred J.
Lindquist, Albert .
Adair, Iona .
Jernberg, John E.
Whitmore, Lena A. ...
Wright, Tom .
Strong, James R.
Crowe, ' Bert .
Lamphere, Geo. N. ...
Moore, Pren .
Collier, Ira L.
Lewis, H. T.
Hickman, C. W.
Hulbert, H. W.
I.awes, W. H.
Rosenberg, Edwin J. . .
Price, Mabel E.
Jenkins, Francis .
Goethals, Celina R. ...
Schell. Mabel H.
Axtell, H. L.
Little, Dr. C. N..
Wilson, C. B.
Taylor, Dorothy ..
French, Permeal ..
Brown, Carrie A.
Butterfield, R. S.
Giese, A. G .
Goss, L. W.
Hatfield,' W. M.
Hawn, Joseph .
Jameson, C. D.
MacCaughey, Chas.
McDermott, H. W.
Madsen, Niels .
Meek, Mrs. J. E.
Mills, S. C.
Patterson, R. A.
Phillips, T. P.
Samjtson, John D.
Sampson, Mrs. John D. .
Sandall, Fae .
Snow, I. E.
$ 10,000
1,000
100
50
100
50
60
50
100
200
50
260
100
300
50
100
50
50
1,300
50
300
300
300
200
50
100
150
300
100
300
300
400
250
60
250
50
300
60
50
300
300
100
100
300
100
100
50
300
100
50
60
50
700
DL
]Q
Yanks Over Here
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Watson, W. M.
Yackley, Sam .
Youngs, Anna M..
Yost, John F .
Richtsmeier, Julius .
Gormsen, Geo.
Fleener, David B.
Driscoll, Katie G .
Mallery, W. A.
Thompson, J. S.
Bumgarner, Clarence .
Naylor, R. A.
Naylor, J. R..
Hart, Geo. E.
Roth, W. D.
Heath, H. L.
Ott, Jno.
Clark, F. A.
Russell, W. S. ' .
Driscoll, Geo.
Christenson, Ole .
Elliott, W. N.
Mudgett, Roy J.
Lyon, Homer .
Paulson, Gust J.
Nero, Frank .
Gustafson, F. M..
Larson, Amt .
Potter, Frank S.
Tate, W. P.
Goetz, Eliza, Viola, Idaho....
Naylor, J. L.
Egland, P. E.
Rydholm, A. F .
Headrick, James Isaac .
Rollefson, A. I.
MacLennan, Mrs. Susan .
Bumgarner, A.
Wade, T. E.
Wade, Mrs. T. E.
Pitcher, G. W.
Carpenter, C. C.
Little, Elmer
60
60
60
300
50
50
300
200
50
1,600
50
800
800
100
100
50
50
260
60
400
60
200
60
60
100
100
400
160
50
300
300
500
350
50
100
200
50
100
50
50
100
300
100
MOSCOW POLICE
FORGE KEPT BUSY
CATCH MEN WANTED IN SPO
KANE FOR BURGLARY—BOOZE
PEDDLER IS NABBED
William Saunders, who confessed after
his arrest, to the robbery of Robert Sher
lock, in Spokane, of a diamond ring
worth $400 and $165 in cash, was arrest
ed here yesterday evening by Chief of
Police Stillinger and Deputy John Samp
son, and was taken to Spokane in an
automobile last night by Roy Fordyce, of
the Spokane detective force. He was
found with the crowd at the round-up
and carnival. He admitted his identity
and when taken into custody and told
that he could ask for extradition he de
cided to not ask for it but accompanied
Fordyce to Spokane. Chief of Police
Stillinger says Saunders confessed to the
theft and told where he had sold the ring
for $160 and he had $140 in cash on his
person when arrested. The money was
taken from him.
Two Indians arrested for being drunk
pleaded guilty but were released upon
telling who had furnished them the
liquor and assisting the officers to find
the man who was caught at the gate of
the carnival grounds in his automobile.
He gave his name as Guy Horner. Two
pint bottles of whiskey were foTmd in
his bedding. He was lodged in the
county jail to await trial on state and
United States charges of having liquor
in a dry state and selling liquor to
Indians. The arrest was made oy Chief
of Police Stillinger and Mr. Sampson
and a deputy United States marshal,
James Rice, of Lewiston.
Miss Margaretta Costella is visiting
friends in Genesee for a few days.
HORACE MANN CHARGED WITH
SEDITION, HELD TO FEDERAL
GRAND JURY
BOSSE. — Horace Mann, who for
about two months has been an organizer
for the nonpartizan league in Gooding
county, is in jail at Gooding. He is be
ing held pending action by the United
States department of justice on charge
ot seditious statements and actions, hav
ing been arrested today.
Mann's arrest was requested by the
Gooding county council of defense after
he bad made a confession under oath as
to his employment and his utterances.
The action of the council of defense
was unanimous. Atténtion was first
called to the activities of Mann through
affidavits alleging that Mann had
pressed his sympathy with Haywood, the
I. W. W. leader, who was tried in Idaho
for complicity in the assassination of
former Governor Steunenberg, and that
he had declared that ex-governor Good
ing, who was governor during the Hay
wood trial, was as big a criminal as
Haywood, and that Gooding had kid
napped Haywood from Colorado, al
though the supreme court of the United
States had declared his extradition to
Idaho was legal. The Gooding county
council recommended that the depart
ment of justice proceed against Mann.
Former Governor Gooding made the
following statement ;
"Ever since the assassination of ex
governor Steunenberg these hounds have
been after me. Horace Mann's attack on
me is no new thing.
"When the matter was called to the
attention of the nonpartizan league in
Boise a statement was issued to the
effect tha the league repudiiated Mann."
ex
HOW PALOUSE CITY
HANDLES SLACKERS
NEIGHBORING TOWN PUBLISHES
NAMES OF NON-BOND BUYERS
AS PRO-GERMANS
Palouse will "go over the top" in
the fourth Liberty loan drive today.
This is the statement made by J. P.
Duke, cashier of the -Security State
bank of that place, who was in Mos
cow last night. Mr. Duke said:
"We lack but a few thousand dol
lars of having our quota raised and
the bank subscriptions have not yet
been reported. All we have to do is
to put in our subscriptions and we
are over the top. But there are a
few who have not subscribed and have
promised to subscribe today and these
will more than make up our quota
and then the banks will turn over
their subscriptions and we will be far
over our quota."
Mr. Duke tells an interesting story
of how Palouse handled the third and
fourth loan drives. They have a splen
did organization and all are workers.
In each precinct there is a captain
with two or more assistants. These
are always loyal, enterprising and
wide-awake men. They are on honor
to get their subscriptions in first and
then to go after the others in their
precincts. Beirr farmers (in the rural
districts) they have no business in
terests that will suffer by offending
a neighbor and the man who refuses
to buy or is negligent or slow, gets
no soft words. He is denounced as a
slacker or "pro-German" if he does
not take his quota. He is told that
"every one but you in this precinct
has done his duty. Now you do yours
or get out. This is no place for a
slacker to live." As a result every
precinct is coming through 100 per
cent.
But, as was done in the third loan
drive, if there are some who fail to
subscribe or take less than their quota
their names are published in the local
newspaper as "slackers," under Bie
caption: "These are slackers, Pr.i
Germans and Hun Sympathizers."
Few men can stand such publicity and
Palouse has won an enviable record
for getting its quotas in the shortest
time.
"If a man in our section is assessed
for a certain amount ho must take
that amount. Taking part of it does
not take him out the slacker and pro
German list," said Mr. Duke. We do
not mince words. A man is either
100 per cent American or he is a
slacker. There is no half-way place
between these two."
Mr. Duke says that sime errors
have been made in the Latah county
assessments in districts tributary to
Palouse. He cited several instances.
One is a 17-year-old boy, working for
wages, who was assessed $150. An
other is a man with 80 acres of tim
ber land, about one-third of which is
in cultivation, who has quite a large
family and a hard time to make a
living, being assessed $200 while a
near neighbor, worth $60,000, and a
money maker, was assessed but $400.
The Latah county citizens who bank
at Palouse buy bonds through the Pa
louse banks and efforts are being
made to straighten out these errors
and make a more just and equitable
assessment where errors are appar
rent.
r-.
Mr. and Mrs. Ottis Bradley of Farm
ington are in Moscow for a few days.
Mrs. Brady was formerly Miss Dora
_Rawson.
BEAN HARVEST IS
ON IN LATAH COUNTY
SOME CROPS ARE WORTH MORE
THAN THE LAND UPON WHICH
THEY ARE GROWN
Bean harvest is nearing its close in
Latah county and one of the best crops
of beans ever harvested here is nearly
saved. From the bean growing districts
near Juliaetta and Kendrick come re
ports of crops that are bringing large
returns to the growers. Columbus Clark
reports a yield of about 800 pounds per
acre on 30 acres and yields of 1,000
pounds and better have been reported.
It is believed the average for the entire
county will run well above 700 pounds
per acre and. with present prices, this
means good returns to the growers.
Not nearly all of the beans have been
threshed, but those not threshed are all
in stack, so the rains will not damage
them seriously. Threshing is going on
at a lively rate. The Idaho National
Harvester company's pea thresher, which
has been in operation near Moscow
threshing peas and grain, lias gone to the
bean fields and is busily engaged in
threshing beans. It has work enough
engaged to keep it busy for tw'o week#
yet..
Ford Parks, of near Kendrick, reports
an average yield of 8 1-2 sacks (.weigh
ing about 140 pounds each) from 70
acres. He sold the crop for $7,173, or
more than $100 per acre, and has 36
sacks left for seed. Many bean raisers
this year will get more for their bean
crop than the land on which the beans
were grown is worth.
In addition to the beans the straw is
quite valuable for stock feed. One farm
er near Kendrick has the straw from
100 acres of beans in one stack and is
offering it for sale. It will bring enough
to go a long way toward paying the ex
pense of cultivating and harvesting the
crop.
■ fc.
BATTLE TANK TO BE
NAMED FOR IDAHO
BATTLESHIPS AND TANKS NAM
ED AFTER STATE GIVING
LIBERTY LOAN QUOTA
As a mark of distinguished service
in the Fourth Liberty Loan campaign,
the privilege of bestowing their names
upon steamships of the United States
Shipping Board and upon fighting
tanks has been accorded respectively
to cities and counties of the Twelfth
Federal Reserve district.
Ten ships and ten fighting tanks
will under this plan bear the names
of the cities and counties which have
made the greatest records for over
subscription when the loan campaign
closes on October 19.
The cities, for the ship competition,
have been divided into five classer;
according to their population in tht
1910 census, as follows:
Class A (more than 250,000)—Lof;
Angeles, San Francisco, one ship.
Class B (150,000 to 250,000) Port»
land, Oakland, Seattle, one ship.
Class C (50,000 to 150,000)—Hono
lulu, Spokane, Salt Lake City, Tacoma,
one ship.
Class D (25,000 to 50,000)—Berk
eley, Sacramento, San Jose, San Diego
Pasadena, Ogden, two ships.
Class E (10,000 to 25,000)—Phoenix
Alameda, Riverside, Redlands, Boise,
Aberdeen, Bakersfield, Fresno, Eur
eka, Santa Cruz, Pomona, Long Beach,
Salem, Bellingham, Stockton, Vallejo,
Saq Bernardino, Santa Barbara, Ever
ett, Yakima, Walla Walla, five ships.
That each state and territory of the
district may be represented on the
front in France, the tanks have been
assigned for competition as follows:
Alaska, one tank; Northern Cali
fornia, one tank; Southern California,
tank; Hawaii, one tank; Idaho,
tank; Nevada, one tank; Oregon,
one tank; Utah, one tank; Washing
ton, one tank; to the second highest
county in the state or territory re
turning the highest number of over
subscription counties, one tank.
The privilege of naming the ships
is accorded to the General Publicity
committee of the Liberty Loan organi
zation by Mrs. Woodrow Wilson, who
entrusted with the duty of nam
The
one
one
was
ing all shipping board vessels.
War Department made the same dis
pensation as to naming the tanks.
The selection of sponsors for the
christening ceremonies of both tanks
and ships will be made by the suc
cessful communities by methods ap
proved by their Liberty Loan com
mittees. .
Contests for the honor of officiat
ing as sponsor may be opened to all
persons except members of the fam
ilies of Liberty Loan executives. Un
der no circumstances will ships or
tanks be named after individuals or
organizations.
The awards will not be made until
after the closing of the campaign
and only subscriptions in the hands
of the Federal Reserve bank will be
considered.
*
SEATTLE HAS SPANISH
INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC
SEATTLE.—Every place of indoor
assembly in Seattle, schools, theatres,
churches have been ordered closed by
the mayor, as a means of combatting
the spread of Spanish influenza.

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