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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 05, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-10-05/ed-1/seq-2/

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sunday,
at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
fhe Official Newspaper of the City of
Moscow
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
16, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress of
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
delivered by carrier to any part of city
Fer Month ..
ihree Months
Six Months ..
0ne Year ....
50c
$1.50
2.75
5.00
By Mail
. (outside of city and on rural routes) :
Per Month ..
Three Months
Six Months .
One Year ...
40c
$1.25
2.70
4.00
Member of the Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusively
Witkled to the use for publication of all
sews dispatches credited to it, or not
•Otherwise credited, in this paper, and
•Iso to local news published herein. All
sights of republication of special dis
patches herein are also reserved.
Your Liberty bond quota in the pres
ent campaign is two per cent of your
net worth. If your quota should be S100,
your net worth is estimated at $5,000.
If you should have to borrow the money
to buy that bond, and pay eight per cent
interest for it, the interest you would
pay during the year would amount to
13 .75 more than the interest you would
receive from your bond. You arc thus
giving $3.75 to your country to help
make America safe for yourself and for
your children. You have made your
$5,000, or your $50,000, as the case may
be, tin der the protection of the Stars and
Stripes, and with opportunities which no
other nation on the face of the earth
offers. If you are compelled to borrow
money for a year to buy your bonds, you
are paying out, for the perpetuation of
America's free institutions and to uphold
right against the the
wrong,
sum of $3.75 for each $5.000 that you are
worth. Isn't it worth it?—Palouse Re
public.
m m is;
Every available acre in the Palouse
country should be planted to wheat, oats,
barley, peas or beans for 1919. All the
land that can be plowed and planted to
wheat this fall should be planted to good
varieties of wheat. The law of averages
almost insures a bumper crop next year
and we are told that food stuffs will be
needed by a starving world more next
year than ever before and that for 10
years after the war closes the United
States will have to use every available
acre to feed the world. It is "almost a
cinch" that the Palouse country, which
has yielded the two poorest crops in its
history the past two years, will redeem
itself by giving one of the best crops it
has ever produced in 1919. Let us plant
every acre and trust to providence to
give us a bountiful harvest.
s4 g«
Many schools are taxing their capacity
to take more students for army training
than they can properly care for. Presi
dent Lindley is very wisely trying to
limit the number who come to the Uni
versity of Idaho, preferring to have 500
who can be properly cared for and given
the proper training, than to have 1,000
half trained and half cared for. The
University of Idaho has won an enviable
reputation with the war department with
its first two contingents, because the
cilities of the school were not Jvertaxed.
Pk *&■
} * <*.
Latah county is doing its bit in pro
ducing food for the armies. The humble
bean is one of the most dependable army
foods ever known and this county
probably producing more beans this year
than any county in the state . The French
use peas to a great extent for food and
Latah county produced tens of thousands
of bushels of peas this year. But the
yield of these and other grains should
be doubled next year when a favorable
season is almost assured.
Portland (Oregon) women have boy
cotted the kid glove. Not that they
"have it in for" the glove, hut lire nation
needs all the leather it can get for war
purposes and patriotic Portland women
have announced that they will not wear
kid gloves until the war ends. Any
woman seen in Portland with kid gloves
is denounced as a slacker. 1 his is one
way to help effectually.
PL pti
Moscow people would resent the state
ment that Palouse is a better town than
Moscow : yet Palouse has her fourth
Liberty loan quota raised and Moscow
has about 30 per cent of her quota sub
scribed. The Bible says : "By their
works shall ye know them."
PB IBS PK
Building Cold Storage.
A cold storage is being built in
the old Farmers' Warehouse, the con
tract having been let to Emil Wick
land, who commenced work last Mon
day.» The building will be 20x40x10
feet. It will fill a crying need at this
point for facilities to store perishable
fruit and vegetables in winter. A
number of farmers are back of the
enterprise.—Latah County Press.
psg
Mark Howe is Busy.
Mark Howe, deputy United States
marshal, with headquarters at Moscow,
is a "powerful busy man" now. He had
122 summons and subpoenas to serve lor
the term of court beginning early in
November and has served most of them
He returned today from a trip occupying
a number of days ami will go out agam
next week.
IMENCE Of THE
MODERN NEWSPAPER
DEARY CITIZEN TELLS EDITOR
OF LOCAL PAPER SOME
WHOLESOME FACTS
O' - the signature "A Reader" the
Latah County Press, one of the county's
brightest newspapers, containing the fol
lowing communication which is so full
of good, sound sense tha it is repub
lished with the hope that those who are
so prone to criticise newspapers may
read and profit by it. The article fol
lows :
"To the Editor:
"May I speak through your columns
in the expression of a few opinions con
cerning the modern newspapers ? I fear
that in the past I, as well as others, have
not sufficiently appreciated the value of
the newspaper—one of the most wonder
ful of modern inventions.
"As an illustration of the development
of the printing business, it has been esti
mated that if Benjamin Franklin should
step up and take charge of the 'Saturday
Evening Post,' as it is now, bringing his
facilities with him, it would take him
nineteen years to print a single weekly
edition.
"There would certainly be a lonesome
and dissatisfied lot of people in this
country if all the newspapers were dis
continued a few weeks for some reason.
I cannot think of a class of people, nor
of indtvidauls of my acquaintance, who
do not need the newspapers. There is
hardly a person in the country, who can
read, who does not read the newspaper
these days and feel that it is almost in
dispensible.
"A few among the religious class have
in times past criticised the newspapers
quite severely. However, even they are
coming more and more to realize that
the newspaper is an important help in
Bible study. How can that be? Because
it records the many events of this time
which the Bible writers predicted thou
sands of years ago. Careful Bible stu
dents can hardly read a single copy of
any live paper now without reading of
happenings that are in direct fulfillment
of Bible prophecies.
"Those who fee! like criticising the
modern newspaper should perhaps rea
lize that they are partly to blame for
the publication of so many features
which they consider objectionable. There
is probably nothing the average editor
desires more than to publish the things
which will be interesting and uplifting to
the readers of his paper ; but if his read
ers demand 'blood and thunder stories,'
and all the details of every crime, and
of every demoralizing occurrance. the
editor must not be blamed too much for
publishing that class of reading,
more good people would express to edi
tors and publishers their appreciation of
the good and uplifting articles which ap
pear in their papers, the editor would
doubtless find more room for such arti
cles and less for the other kind.
"Rut on the other hand, we should not
lay all the blame on the editors and pub
lishers if we waste our time reading
things which are of no value to us. The
entire paper was not prepared for our
special benefit: and we arc expected to
use our own wisdom and judgment in
reading only those things which we find
helpful to us. It is the aim of the editors
and publishers to print such a variety of
matter in every paper that every reader
will find something which more than
repays and the time spent in reading it.
"In this day when 'of the making of
hooks there is no end' and when there
are more than 24,000 periodicals publish
ed in this country, a knowledge of what
to read and how to road it is of great
value. Let us train ourselves in the
choice of our reading, instead of trying
to get the editors to publish only that
of which we approve.
"Very truly yours.
If
"A READER."
PH
fa
fcfeool
is
S. Mark's Church.
Sunday services—8 a. m., Holy Com
munion; 9:45 a. m., Sunday school—
Special rally day services.
11 a. m., Choral celebration. Ad
dress:
Christian Science and New Thought."
This is the fourth of a series on
"The Problem of Organized Christian
ity."
7 p. m. meeting in Guild Hall to
organize a study circle. An invita
tion is extended to all seekers and
students of truth. The object of the
circle is not to dogmatise, but to
search. We ask for suggestions.
A study class for S. A. T. C. and
others will be formed shortly.
W. H. Bridge, Rector.
Rally Day.
At the First Christian church tomor
row morning will be Rally Day. If you
are not in some Sunday school, then
arc urged to he present. Let us be
patriotic to our country and our God.
The Value of Theosophy,
y * >11
Catholic Church
Second mass,
8: 0C
Early mass,
10:30: benediction. 7.30 p. m.
REV. R. PECOUL, Rector.
Two Timely Subjects.
The Rev. J. Quincy Biggs will deliver
an address immediately after the Young
People's meeting tomorrow evening on
the subject, "Is There a God?" The fol
lowing Sunday evening the address will
be on the subject, "If There Is a God.
What Has He to Dp With the Affairs
of This World, in the Present Crisis?"
The Parasites of Moscow.
At 11 :10 tomorrow morning the pastor
at the First Christian church will de
liver a sermon on the Parasites of Mos
cow. There are two great drives on at
present, the fourth Liberty loan and the
rallying of the. forces of the church. Ask
yourself the question, "Am I a Parasite
in Either Case?"
-Jr
The Presbyterian Church.
Tomorrow is rally day at the Presby
Tliere will he a rousing
If
terian church,
patriotic program commencing at 10:15.
Those who take part are asked to be at
the church at 10:00 o clock. A part of
If
|rcA|F ,
PUBLIC SALt!
x
The undersigned will offer at Public Sale at the farm known as the
Skattaboe Farm, and adjoining Moscow on the Southeast, on
Thürsday, October 10,1918
;
'
Commencing at 10 o'clock a. m. sharp, the following property, to-wit:
1 Three-section Lever Harrow.
1 Four-section Harrow.
1 Spring Tooth Harrow.
1 McCormick 5-foot Mower.
1 McCormick Rake.
1 Fairbanks-Morse Gasoline En
gine, 3 horse power.
1 Flying Dutchman,
Gang.
3 Sixteen-inch Walking Plows.
1 Twelve-inch Walking Plow.
1 Set Heavy Breeching Har
ness.
1 Set Breeching Lead Harness.
1 Set Breeching Plow Harness.
1 One-horse Cultivator.
1 Studebaker 3-inch Wagon.
1 Studebaker 3 1-4-inch Wagon.
1 Common Sense Bob Sleigh.
1 Light Bob Sleigh.
1 Galvanized Water Tank.
1 Hay Rack and 2 Grain Racks.
1 Buggy, 1 Cart, 1 Buggy Har
ness.
1 Scale, weighs ' to 600 pounds.
1 Hand-power Grader.
1 Bowman Cream Separator. .1
Sanitary Churn.
Some Hay) Wheat Straw and
Pea Straw.
Tools, Chains aiid other things
too numerous to mention.
LIVE STOCK
I Gray Gelding, 6 yrs. old, wt.
1690.
1 Gray Gelding, 7 yrs. old, wt.
1605.
1 Bay Gelding, 7 yrs. old, wt.
1525.
1 Bay Gelding, 7 yrs, old, wt.
1500.
1 Brotvn Gelding, 8 yrs. old, wt.
1440.
1 Black Filley, 2 yrs. old, wt.
1260.
1 Black Yearling, wt. 1120.
1 Jersey Cow, 3 years old, now
milking.
1 Jersey Cow, 2 yrs. old, now
milking.
1 Jersey Heifer, 1 yr. old.
1 Spring Calf.
The undersigned has donated a
Jersey Heifer Calf, to be sold
for the benefit of the Moscow
Red Cross.
MACHINERY, ETC.
1 Van Brunt 8-foot Drill.
1 Manure Spreader, 70 bushels.
1 McCormick 7-foot Binder.
1 Disk, 6-foot.
14-inch
TERMS OF SALE—All sums under $20.00 CASH, over that amount
time will be given until October 1st, 1919, on approved Bankable
notes bearing 10 per cent interest.
The undersigned has purchased the Lunch and turned it over to the
Ladies of-the Moscow Red Cross that they may realize a little from it.
HARRY SKATTABOE
CHAS E. WALKS, Auctioneer
Owner
J. G. VENNIGERHOLZ, Clerk
'
,
tlie service will consist in the dedication
of individual service flags for our boys
in the army and navy of the United
States. Dean J. G. Eldridge will preside
and the- sermon of dedication will be de
livered by the Rev. Wayne S. Snoddy.
The service of the evening will he at
7:30. Subject; "A Man of the Night
Lamp." The sermon will be appropriate
to the beginning of the university year.
Students, teachers and friends of the
university are especially invited to this
service. The social hour at six-thirty is
one of the pleasant features of the day.
effect that the league repudiated Mann."
Norwegian Lutheran Church.
Sunday School at 9:45.
Norwegian services at 11 :00.
English services at 8 :00.
F. R. SCHMIDT, Pastor.
1ST.
+ ♦ + + + + ♦♦ *>♦♦♦♦ + ♦♦♦
CONTRIBUTION BOX
*
*♦**+*+**++*♦*+**
Our First Sugarbeet Sirup.
It's all right. We tried it on hot
cakes and oats mush. We consider
very satisfactory. With us it will
eliminate the use of sugar at the
table; a very important item.
In May we received about half an
ounce of seeds from the distributors,
and planted it in a drill thirty yards
We Pay Best Prices in the Northwest for
CATTLE, SHEEP and HOGS
Consign your next shipment to us and get all the
advantages of an exceptional selling service
We can always furnish stock cattle.
Write for our Weekly Market Letter.
P. W. Murphy Commission Co
SPOKANE UNION STOCK YARDS
Spokane, Washington
c
n
Make Next Washday Easy
Yes—Get -he biggest washing out and on the line before 10 o'clock.
No laundiess required. Push a button and the THOR will do the
work. Ng wages to pay anyone. No meals to serve. What a dif
ference between this and the old wasteful way of wearing out the
clothes on i washboard and rubbing and wringing most of the day!
Electric
Washing Machine
dees a good s.zed washing in an houi.
Costs only 2c an hour for electricity.
Positively the .nost economical way to wush. The THOR actually pays for
itself as it goes along. It saves more than it costs. Over 130,000 women have
already proved that in their homes. Come and we will prove it also. We will
show you how to get better washing done for less than it costs you
ini
now.
$5.00 BRINGS THE THOR TO YOUR HOME
Then $5.00 a month until paid for, and it is yours. Sold on our
guarantee that it will do all we claim or your money back.
Come this week- come before next washday. Let ut show you how it
saves money and drudgery and gives a woman a day of leisure.
Washington Water P
Co.
ower
uauH
ar'^ni
MUi
c
q
long. The' seeds came at once, nicely.
When ready to thin to a stand we
carefully transplanted the surplus
plants, making another row of the
same length.
This October 4, for a sample, we
pulled enough roots to ftiake two gal
lons of sliced beets, which we sliced
on a slaw cutter and followed Govern
ment directions. While the Mrs. was i
ironing she was also evaporating the
liquid. This morning we enjoyed a
very satisfactory though inexpensive
table sirup. |
A. I. MOW (Oct. 5.)
Indian Finds Purse. .
Thomas Types, a full blood Indian,
"
living at Arrow Junction, brought a
purse containing $2 to The Star-Mir- 1
ror office, having picked it up on the
street. The purse was claimed by
George Picard, whose name was found
in it. He had lost it on the street
and says nothing had been taken from
the purse. The Indian who found it
is an intelligent citizen, owns Lib
erty bonds and an automobile and
has a son in the army.
»
LATAH COUNTY RECORDS
Saturday, October 5, 1918.
R. M.—Mary C. Moore to Moscow
Investment Co., $1,450; lots 4, 5-1. Cox's
Lot Addition to Moscow: lots 9,TO, Dca
kin's First Addition to Moscow.
C. M.— Olaf Paulson to Frank Slater,
$1,000 : 8 horses, cow, binder, machinery.
W. D.—Gust Jenson to W. L. Yockey,
$1 : N'E'ly half lots 1, 2, 3-4, and 1-2 well.
W. D,—Arthur A. Booth to J. H.
Pifer, $1; SW 1-4 NW 1-4 NE 1-4 SW
1-4 21-41-2 W.
Rel.— T. Driscoll to Minnie Bell Isak
sen, r-m 9-27-14,
Writ of Attachment.—Samuel Lackner
to O. F. Lazelle, $28.92.

* ♦
MARKETS
♦ ♦♦♦ * * ****** * * *
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed dally,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses $2.02%
Wheat, Bluestem, No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, s'ked,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1 bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 3.00%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, s'ked
[ net, delivered to warehouses 2.09%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 1.97%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 sit'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.06%
No. 1 Feed Oats sacked, per
hundred ...
No. 1 Timothy Hay...
Produce.
3,26
$34,00
Eggs, per doz...
Butter, creamery, per lb
Butter, ranch, per lb.
New Potatoes, per lb....
Young chickens, per lb...
Hens, per lb.
Old roosters, per lb......
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb.18c
Hogs, dressed, It, per [email protected]
Hogs, dressed, hfeavy, per lb.. [email protected]
Veal, live wt., per [email protected]
Veal, dressed, per [email protected]
Spring Lnrnbs, per lb.... 10(3)12 l-2e
[email protected]
45c
65c
60c
02c
... 16c
12 l-2<®16c
08c
Mutton, per lb
Chas. E. Walks
AUCTIONEER
If you are going to sell and desire
my services, secure your dates as
early as possible, as I sell nearly
every day during the Sale Season.
The following are my sales and
dates for the neyt three weeks:
Saturday, Oct. 5—Joe Meschefske, at
Genesee
Monday, Oct. 7—Arthur E. Luck, at
Pullman.
Tuesday, Oct. 8—Bert Hately, at
Pullman.
Wednesday, Oct. 9—Ph;l Moretz, at
Kendrick.
Thursday, Oct. 10—Harrj Skattaboe,
at Moscow.
Friday, Oct. 11—M. Farley, at Pull
man.
n„+ 10 -r, i » r
° 12 ~ Fred Rle1 ' at Le '
*
Monday, Oct. 14— S. J. Felts, at
Garfield.
&
Tuesday, Oct. 15— E. B. Paul, at Gen
esee.
Telephone 278, Office; or 179 J. my
Residence, if you desire a date.
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
HELP WANTED—CHAMBER MAID
and elderly lady to help in the kitchen
at the Idaho Hotel._298tf
WANTED—HOUSEKEEPER; TWO
in the family. 147N.5-7
WANTED—A WAITRESS AT MOS
COW Hotel.
6-13
COMPETENT MAID WANTED FOR
general house work. Phone 255R
or call at 821 Elm street.
7-9
HELP WANTEIWMale •
WANTED — 50' PRUNE PICKERS.
Inquire U. S. Employment Service.
______291 tf
WANTED—MAN WITH TRUCK TO
take contract to haul lumber ; good
haul and good money; long job in
country. F. L. C,, Star-Mirror office.
2 tf
WANTED —REGISTRANT QUALI
fied for limited service only, who has
clerical ability, as a clerk for S. A. T. C.
University. Apply to Commandant. 303tf
FOR RENT—Rooms
ROOMS—FURNISHED; SINGLE OR
double; modern. 210 First St.
298-tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 206H.
231tf
FOR RENT—2 OR 3-ROOM APART
ments. Price |7 up. 124 E. Seventh
Phone 130J.
70tl
FOR RENT — FOUR FURNISHED
rooms for housekeeping. Phone 262J.
1-12
FRONT BEDROOM INCLUDING
bath; lady preferred. 220 North
Washington.
3-8
ROOMS FOR RENT—ALSO SUITE
of rooms, hot and cold water, mod
ern conveniences; prices reasonable.
426 Third St. Mrs. D. Urquhart.
144tf
FOR RENT —7-ROOM, STRICTLY
modern home, near paved street ; very
best district; low rent for quick action.
C. H. Patten.
7 9
FOR RENT—4-ROOM APARTMENT,
furnished: sink in kitchen; private
bath ; private entrance to apartment. 128
Howard St. Phone 187N or 9006.
295-tf
FOR TRADE
FOR TRADE—SMALL SAFE FOB
a larger one. Star-Mirror.
tf
WANTED — TO EXCHANGE ONE
two bottom 14-inch gang plow lor
three bottom. Phone 9251. J. H.TJÿe.
289tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT—A 6-ROOM MODERN
house close in. Mrs. C. C. Brown.
Phone 174.
FOR RENT—AN 8-ROOM MODERN
house, near the dormitory; ready din
the 17th of this month. Phone 170J. 3(f
4-7
FOR RENT—NINE ROOM MODEBN
house. South Main. Phone 201L.
288 -tf
L. E. Brooks.
ONE OF OUR MODERN COTTAGES
on N. Jackson St. will be for rent in
a few days. Inquire at Hagan & Cush
ing's. __6tf
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market.
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave., Spokane, Wash.
235h tf
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE *
29i-tf
desk. Telephone 352.
WANTED—BY UNIVERSITY WO
man, suite of two rooms, or one
large room. State location, price, con
veniences. P. O. Box 286. §-J
WANTED—GOOD COW; JERSEY
preferred. Phone 189N after 6
p. m.
4-T
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR SALE — 40 ACRES TIMBER
land ; some cleared ; lots of wood ;
price low and easy terms. Phone 82L.
291 tf
Harry Rawson.
FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODERN
residence ; choice location, corner lot,
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam Silrey.
255-tf.
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
244tf
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
FÖR SALE — 80 ACRES THREE
miles east of Moscow ; hc>use and barn.
Write E. R. Fuller, Lewiston, Idaho, or
see N. G. Gilbertson, adjoining farm. 6 tf
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
PLACE YOUR ORDERS FOR .
Wagner apples for winter now. Call
9054.
3-8;
FOR SALE CHEAP—ONE KITCHEN:
cabinet oak ; two good Howard heat
; one large oak sideboard. Phone
41L.
3-8
SOME CHOICE JENKINS' CLUB
and No. 60 wheat for sale. Washburn
Wilson.
2-9"
FOR SALE —PEA STRAW IN
stack or delivered; two miles out.
Phone 9334.
2-7
DODGE, 1918 MODEL OVERSIZED
..cord tires. Will selLcheap; terms.
Phone 290 R. V. L. Nelson, 718 East
300-tf
7th.
FOR SALE—HOUSEHOLD FURNI
ture, very cheap for few days only.
293tf
South Lilly St,
M£)LINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tf
FOR SALE—1 DEERING BINDER;
sell for cash or trad» in stock. M. J.
Schu, Moscow, Idaho. Rt. 3.
244tf
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane, Wash.
235-tf
FOR SALE—BEAN HARVESTER
Has been used very
little and is good as new. Price $40.
Write or phone Garfield Fruit & Pro
duce company, Garfield, Wash.
for sale.
297-tf
$45.
NEW RANGE FOR SALE
Call 268L.
5-7
FOR SALE—1 ELECTRIC RANGE,"
1 Howard heater, good as new. 115 N.
Jackson. Phone 150J.
5-1 1
FOR SALE—HOUSEHOLD GOODS,
including rockers, leather couch settee,,
bedroom set, cooking utensils, dishes,
garden tools, etc. Phone 128N. 634 B
street._ 7-9
FOR SALE — ONE HENDERSON
motorcycle. This must be sold in the
next 24 hours as the owner is entering
government service. Martin S. Taylor,
226 South Almond. Phone 261N.
7
FOR SALÉ —Live Stock
FOR SALE
LINCOLN RAM
lambs. Frank Wallen. Phone 926X6.
4-16
FIVE REGISTERED HOLSTEIN
Freisen cows, high producing and
testing; also one pure bred Holstein
bull calf. Priced right for quick sale.
Address Wm. Hennen, Moscow. Phone
9237.
tf
FOR SALE—TEAM, HARNESS,
wagon, plow and harrow. $150 if
taken at once. W. F. Duncan, Or
chard Ave.
3-8
FOR SALE—10 HEAD OF HORSES,
buggies, harness and wagons, cheap.
Phone 28. George W. Stewart.
301tf
IF YOU WANT A TEAM OR MORE
of good young horses, call on W. F.
Sponsler, or phone 9377, Moscow. 6-11
FOR SALE—A COW; WILL BE
291tf
fresh soon. Phone 9238.
FOR SALE—PIGS, 5 OR 6 MONTHS
old ; red. Phone 204Y, evenings.
5-7

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