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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 10, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-10-10/ed-1/seq-2/

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Published every evening except Sunday,
_
The Official Newspaper of the City of
Moscow
y-. , , .
iÎmi 35 secorK * _c " a . ss tttatter Oct.
Wahn 9 l'.rm 1 th tb P0 Ä
March 1879 g
i«jarcn,
The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAM PH ERE, Publisher.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Delivered by carrier to any part of city
Jrer Month .50c
$1.50
Three Months
Six Months ..
Pne Year ....
2.75
5.00
By Mail
(outside of city and on rural routes) :
Per Month ..
Three Months
Six Months .
'Dne Year ...
40c
$1.25
2.70
4.00
Member of the Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled to the use for publication of all
sews dispatches credited to it, or not
otherwise credited, in this paper, and
also to local news published herein. All
rights of republication of special dis
patches herein are also reserved.

GERMANY GOING TO PIECES.
Events are following each other in
tapid succession in Germany. The form
|r chancellor Von Hertling resigned and
his successor is a man who opposed Ger
many's military attitude and designs.
Hindenburg, the idol of the German
(people, who was to be the Moses to
lead them of the
defeat coming and resigned as com
mander of the army. ,
Ludendorff, claimed to be "the brains"
of Germany's war party, has had
"physical collapse," and he, too, quits
the kaiser's army.
And now comes a rumor, as yet un
confirmed, but believed by many to be
founded on fact, that the kaiser has
abdicated., If this is true, and it is well
within the range of possibilities, Ger
many's complete downfall is but a short
way off. It may be months, it may be
weeks and it may possibly be but days,
but it is near at hand.
The German soldiers will not continue
to fight and die when they learn that
those commanding them know that to
fight is useless and 5rc already quitting
the sinking of ships.
Germany, whicTT planned to rule the
world, is today a hopeless wreck, occu
pying a far worse position than did
Spain at the close of her war with the
United States. It would be pitiable, did
not the Germans deserve a far worse
fate than that which now awaits them
and which they cannot avoid.
But, no matter whether Germany col
lapses this week, this month or this
year, the United States needs every dol
lar of the six billion for which it has
asked the people of the country, and it
must have it. We must help our allies
to recuperate after the war. Wc must
bring back our soldiers—your son and
mine—and we must start them in useful
occupations and to do this the United
States must have thecash. It offers you
the best security in the world and a good
rate of interest.
When our soldiers—boys from Mos
cow and neighboring towns, counties
and states, have offered their lives,
whipped the Hun and are still fighting
him to the death—we would, indeed, he
worse than slackers to fail to support
them at this critical time.
BUY MORE BONDS !
fc h
MOSCOW MUST NOT FAIL NOW.
As pointed out by a citizen of Poca
WANTED
Good Bookkeeper to keep, books at
home.
An Hour or two per day.
Crescent Ice & Bottling Works
We have for sale FANCY ALASKA, BLUE
PRUSSIAN, and WHITE CANADA PEAS. Get
your seed stock now. Have your own seed cleaned,
.graded and fumigated.
Phones: 36, 150Y, 19J
Washburn & Wilson Produce Co.
The Old Grice Warehouse — Near Inland Depot
Idaho National Harvester Co.
*
General Machine Shop
and Foundry
Idaho
Moscow
»
iyi- of the people of Idaho
ow. Never be
j fore has the state scrlt so many young
, , . , .
Governor Alexander has offered the on
1 tire resources of the state to support
t ' he „diversify and it is being helped as
. .
never betöre.
. ]f Moscow and Latah county, for
' whom the state has done so much, should
fail to raise their full quota of the fourth
'. .
I Liberty loan, it would result in irre
I parable injury to the school, the county
and the city. We cannot, must not let
this occur
;
, t nc
M
centered
an
on
We have asked Governor Alexander
and the people of the state for assistance
for the school and we received all and
more than we have asked for. We have
had the resources of the state placed at
the disposal of the university and parents
have sent their sons and daughters here
ant j the nation needs the assistance we
to he educated. Now, when the state
are asked to give (and it is not charity,
but the loan of our money on the best
of security and at good interest), we
dare not refuse to do our duty.
Citizens of Moscow and Latah county ;
friends of the University of Idaho, you
are being watched as never before. The
future of the university may be effected
greatly by Moscow and Latah county's^
action in this bond drive. Take no
chances of blighting the great school's
future by refusing, failing or neglecting
to do your plain duty.
We can, we must and we will raise
I
M »
Every day brings better news from
the battlefront in Europe. The German
army is in complete rout and Hinden
burg and Ludendorff have resigned from
its command and rumor has it that
Kaiser Bill has abdicated. The end is
drawing near very rapidly.
j , ooks now like we will have to
j send Pershing to take command 0 f the
No one wants to be "receiver in bank
ruptcy" for Germany. It is really
amusing to see the German idols tumb
ling from their pedestals and getting
under cover before the deluge comes.
German army, which is left without a
head, since both Hindenburg and Luden
dorff have resigned.
Su
On October 27 the "daylight saving"
law changes and the clocks are turned
back one hour. That will mean laying
in bed an hour later, but having to work
an hour longer in the evening.
F8 fc
Wanted, at once, a commander for the
German army. Do not delay in filing
applications for this work.
SAVE MILL FEED
FOR DAIRY CATTLE!
FOOD ADMINISTRATION URGES
CONSERVATION TO INCREASE
MILK SUPPLY
Owing to the extension of the drought
area, the shortening of the corn crop,
the larger animal population in the
country, and the Allied demands upon
us for feeding stuffs for their own ani
mals because of their own shortage in
production of feed grain, it is necessary
that we should exert every effort in the
proper conservation of feeding stuffs
during the next twelve months; yet we
must maintain our own animal produc
»on. It is necessary that we should ship
a larger proportion of wheat as compared
i vv ' t ' 1 flour during the next twelve months
than during the last twelve months to
the allied countries, because their own
shortage of feeding stuffs is such that
I if they arc to keep alive their dairy herds.
they must have a larger supply of grain
I wheat.
Already the milk supply in the allied
countries has been limited practically to
the supply of children and other vitally
" ecessar y u f es >. and a.^ failure
on our part to supply them with neces
sar y feed stuffs for their dairy herd
means that we shall cut into the actual
safety of the children amongst the allies,
On üt ^ ,er hand, both our own popula
tion and the allies arc dependent upon
our production of animal products, and
we do not in any way wish to stifle this
production. What we must secure m
the utmost elimination of waste by the
careful feeding of animals and the use
of all the roughage available.
One of the difficult problems is the
distribution of wheat mill feeds, and this
is made more difficult by the fact that
the food administration, in an endeavor
to protect the farmer, is maintaining an
artificially low price on these feeds. One
consequence is that a great deal of mill
feeds are now going unnecessarily into
work animals or beef production. Every
farmer will recognize that the wheat mill
feeds are vitally necessary for the dairy
cattle, to some extent for the poultry,
and for young pigs. Owing to the ab
sorption of mill feeds at local points
near the mill, considerable sections of
the dairy industry are practically without
mill feeds and our dairy production is
thereby in danger. With view to cor
recting this, so far as possible, the food
administration desires to appeal for the
assistance of the farmers of the country
in the use and distribution of wheat mill
feeds. In this view, we are asking every ,
buyer of wheat mill feeds, outside of
acute drought area, to sign a pledge
honor not to use the wheat mill feeds
for any purpose except the essential use
in dairy, young pig and poultry produc
tion, and not to purchase or hold at any
one time more than 60 days' supply. Un
less we can secure this careful and spe
cialized use of mill feeds, our dairy pro
duction in the congested eastern areas
of the L T nited States is bound to fall and
to jeopardise the food supply of our peo
ple in that section. Otherwise it will be
necessary to release the price restrictions
on mill feeds and allow them to take
their natural course.
With a view to securing this co-opera
tion from the farmers all over the coun
try in the interest of their industry as a
whole, we are instructing the mills and
all dealers in feeds to secure from the
buyer of wheat mill feeds the following
order to assist the food ad
ministration in the distribution of mill
feeds, I hereby undertake on honor
not to use wheat mill feeds for any
other purpose than the feeding of
dairy cattle, poultry, young pigs or
young calves, or the preparation of
r *weekly bran mash for work animals.
I will not feed any more wheat mill
feeds than I customarily fed to such
animals and I further agree not to
have at any one time more than a
60-day supply of feedstuffs on hand."
The food administration is also re
quiring the millers and feed jobbers
to distribute their wheat mill feeds
in such manner that each state re
ceives the same proportion of the mill's
or jobber's shipments as it received
in the same quarter in 1917.
- m -
High Mass at Potlatch.
POTLATCH.—A solemn high mass
was said at the St. Mary's church at
10:30 yesterday morning by Father Zuur
for the boys of the church who are in
the service, and a beautiful service flag
containing nineteen stars was dedicated
in their honor. The choir was lead by
Mrs, Will Wakeman. accompanied by
Dr. E. T. Hein. The Rev. H. Morris,
formerly in charge of this district, con
ducted the evening services. Special
services are being held every night this
month for all the boys in the service.
;e:
n
UNIVERSITY HAS
MANY GIRL STUDENTS
iLARGE NUMBER OF FEMALE
j STUDENTS FROM NORTHWEST
STATES ENROLLED
I Despite the deep interest that is being
. taken in military affairs at the Univer
j sity of Idaho, the number of girl students
! enrolled is very large and is really a
I surprise to university authorities. So
i much interest was centered in the new
military department that it was feared
the number of girl students would fall
below the average for former years, but
instead of that a new record will be set
it is believed.
The girls come from all parts of the
northwest. Idaho is represented well,
1 nearly every county in the state having
I girl students here. Spokane has more
j students than any point outside of the
stare, hut they come from many points
■ in Washington and from other northwest
-frites The list of girls enrolled up to
Monday night follows :
Julia Annette McCallie, Kamiah.
Kathryn Belle McCormack, Lewis
tOQi
^Marjorie Mccrea, Coeur d'Alene.
Camille McDaniel, Moscow.
Katherine Ann Mcintosh, Moscow.
Ellen Irene McKay, Mullan.
Mary McKenna, Spokane, Wash.
Mânilla Reed, Boise.
Pauline Harriet Relk, Bellingham,
Wash.
Gertrude Sabin, Parma.
Leta Mae Sabin, Parma.
Cora Salter, Troüt Creek, Mont.
Elizabeth Sandelius, Moscow.
Inez Belva Sanger, Payette.
Pearl Snyder, Orofino.
Carol Sternberg, Rathdrum.
Katherine Stryker, Spokane, Wash.
Anna Sund, SandPoint.
Effie Idaho Swanson, Pocatello.
Myra Moody, Moscow.
Pearl Morgan, Boise.
Susie Mow, Moscow.
Harriette Neaville, Wallace.
Eva Neil, Nampa.
Stella Nelson, Kendrick.
Sarah Nettleton, Moscow.
Bessie Newman, Shoshone.
Geraldine, Nusbaum, Burley.
Verl Oliver, Orofino.
Judith Olson, Sandpoint.
Georgia Oylear, Middleton.
Lois Parsons, Moscow.
Henrietta Peasley, Boise.
Sylvena Pechanec, Caldwell.
Mary Penwell, Moscow.
Gladys Putnam, St. Mpries.
Evadna Roberts, Nampa.
Ora Rogers, Blackfoot.
Ernestine Rose, Salmon.
Mrs. Frances Rosenberg, Moscow.
Lena Schott, Culdesac.
Ruth Scott, Moscow.
Violet Seely, tv
Alice Sheffield
Glenna Bernadine Adair, Moscow.
Julia Lesetta Adelmann, Boise.
Majorie Albert, Payette.
Marion Albert, Payette.
Florence Allebaugn, Boise.
Edith Anderson, Moscow.
Helga Marie Anderson, Boise.
Freda Maurine Augustine, Los An
.geles, Calif.
Eula Badger, Nampa.
Clara Baker, Moscow.
Josephine Baken, Moscow.
Ellen Maud Baker, Orofino.
Maude Baumann, Starbuck, Wash.
Hellen Lenore Bloom, Spokane,
Wash.
Inez Sarly Callaway, Caldwell.
Edna Capps, Blackfoot.
Oliva Chapman, Twin Falls.
Ruth Chapman, Colfax, Wash.
Ferol Richardson, Moscow.
Marian Ingalls Cnubbuck, Blackfoot
Beatrice Lillian Bloomquist, Shelley
Dena Agnes Lower, Colbert, Wa sh.
(Continued on page 3.)
Moscow.
, Rathdrum.
Go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
for your Harness and Supplies.
Shoes and Shoe Repairing. Par
cels Post Patronage Solicited.
.
m
_
I

■ >
j K
JOHN W. STEVENSON, M. D.
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat
Glasses Fitted
Office of Dr. Aspray, 303 3rd Are.
Phone 177
I
— Woolens for Men's Clothes —
ready for your selection. It will pay
you to look them over.
SCHWARTZ
The Tailor
j. a. McDaniel
Moscow, Idaho
Dentist
Phone 229
-4
Orland 6t Lee
ATTORNEYS and COUNSELORS AT LAW
Practice in District, State. Federal Courts
Office: First National Bank Bids:.
MOSCOW, IDAHO
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Prop.
Moscow, Idaho.
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
BUSINESS HOUSES AND
POLITICIANS
wanting List
wanting an up-to-date Mailing List
made from the county records, call
THE STAR-MIRROR
WANTED
a
A
LATHER
$4 A THOUSAND, ABOUT
20,000 LATHS TO BE PUT ON.
ANSWER AT ONCE
SAMPSON AND STERN
Moscow Phone 105W
Lewiston Phone 604L
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED
L. M. K1TLEY
PHONE 248
I
V'ctrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sure the
First to Have h
An
Dr. Adair Health Officer.
Mayor Warren Truitt appointed Dr.
W. A. Adair city healtli officer this
afternoon and Dr. Adair has accepted
the oppointment. So far as known there
are no cases of influenza in Moscow.
The order of the state board of health
will be observed here. Schools will not
be closed at present, but no other public
meetings will be permitted. Even wo
men's sewing circles, when engaged in
Red Cross work, are not omitted from
the order and will not be permitted to
meet until the embargo is lifted.
— — ■ ■ -
Motored From Ohio.
C. B. Wilson, county club leader and
member of the staff of the agricultural
college, is enjoying a visit with his
mother, Mrs. Elsie Wilson, and his
brother, B. D. Wilson and the latter's
two children, and a friend, Miss Sarah
King, of Wellington, Ohion. The party
motored from their home to Moscow in
a Dodge car, being 24 days on the road,
taking it by easy stages and seeing the
country as they came. They will be here
two wteks and will then return via the
southern route.
/CORNWALL FARMER SELLS
TO MAN FROM GENESEE
Roily Morton has moved to the Sig
Coman farm. George and Bill Tomer,
who have been on that farm for a num
ber of years, have moved to Moscow.
Glen Morton, who has been at Kooskia
for a couple of years, will again take
charge of the Lankard farm.
Mrs. Hendrickson and children have
moved to Moscow on account of the
schools. Mr. Hendrickson will keep
bachelor's hall in the meantime.
Hugh Keefe has rented the Parmenter
farm north of Cornwall. Tom Benton,
who did live there, has takeif charge of
his mother's farm.
A Mr. Kasper from Genesee, brother
of John Kasper, has bought the Ledg
wick 80 acres for a reported considera
tion of $5,000.
Mrs. Chas. Hobert of Clarkson ; s
our neighborhood for a visit v^ith friends
and relatives.
Big Red Cross Dance.
At Wheelan Grange hall, Friday, Oct.
18. Four-piece orchestra, including mid-
night supper. Come everybody and
a worthy cause.
--—
The owner of an Excelsior motorcycle,
1918 model, is leaving for France
once and asks me to sell the machine
for him within 24 hours. It is a three
I speed and nearly new. Will sell cheap.
L. N. Tracy, 24Ô North Washington.
* ! ** ! *• I ** I ** I ** I ** I ** I ** I ** I ** I ** I ** I ** ; ** I ** I ** I ** I ** T
-*
Hotel Moscow
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
Thoroughly Modern
ctbot <-1 emu
f x LLAöu KILL
't AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS 4
\
5
».
*r
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARB! I.
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
AUCTIONEER
If you are going to sell and desire
my services, secure your dates
early as possible, as I sell nearly
every day during the Sale Season.
The following are my sales
dates for the next two weeks:
Thursday, Oct. 10—Harry Kkattaboe,
at Moscow.
Friday, Oct. 11—M. Farley, at Pull
man.
Saturday, Oct. 12—Fred Riel, at
land.
Monday, Oct. 14— S. J. Felts,
Garfield.
Tuesday, Oct. 15— E. B. Paul, at Gen
esee.
Wednesday, Oct. 16— H. B. Trask,
Agatha.
Thursday, Oct. 17—F.\E. Hungate,
Pullman.
Friday, Oct. 18— W. M. Hennen,
Moscow.
Saturday, Oct. 19—George Stewart,
Moscow.
Monday, Oct. §1—Ernest Fleiger,
Juliaetta.
Tuesday, Oct. 22— R. L. Hollenbeck,
at Pullman.
Wednesday, Oct. 23—Mrs. M. Lowen,
at Genesee.
Thursday, Oct. 24— W. T. Cameron,
Moscow.
Telephone, 278, Office; or 179 J.
Residence, if yon desire a date.
my
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
HELP WANTED—CHAMBER MAID
and elderly lady to help in the kitchen
298tf
at the Idaho Hotel
WANTED—A WAITRESS AT MOS
cow Hotel.
6-13
HELP WANTED—Male
WANTED — 50 PRUNE PICKERS.
Inquire U. S. Employment Service.
291tf
Dr.
| FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
in
to
FOB RENT—Rooms
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 205H.
28 Itf
FOR RENT—2 OR 3-ROOM APART
ments. Price S7 up. 124 E. Seventh
Phone 130J.
70tf
ROOMS FOR RENT—ALSO SUITE
of rooms, hot and cold water, mod
em conveniences; prices reasonable,
426 Third St. Mrs. D. Urquhart.
144 tf
FOR RENT—4-ROOM APARTMENT,
furnished ; sink in kitchen ; private
bath ; private entrance to apartment. 128'
Howard St. Phone 187N or 9006. '
295-tf
FOR TRADE
FOR TRADE—SMALL SAFE FOB
a larger one. Star-Mirror.
tf
WANTED — TO EXCHANGE ONE
two bottom 14-inch gang plow for
three bottom. Phone 9251. J. H. Dye.
289tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT—AN 8-ROOM MODERN
house, near the dormitory; ready on
the 17th of this month. Phone 170J.
Mrs. John Shannon.
3tf
ONE OF OUR MODERN COTTAGES
in
on N. Jackson St. will be for rent in
a few days. Inquire at Hagan & Cush
ing's. _ 6tf
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market.
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave., Spokane, Wash.
at
10
235-tf
11
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 362.
291*-tf
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR SALE BY OWNER—360 ACRES
well improved stock ranch, nine
miles southeast of Kooskia, Idaho.
. Near Seliway Forest Reserve, where
*' thousands of sheep and cattle are
grazed annually. Will consider trade
*i* on good farm land near Moscow or
4* Pullman. Rt. 1, Box 13, Kooskia,
4« Idaho. _ 9-15
4.
4
FOR SALE — 40 ACRES TIMBER
land; some cleared; lots of wood;
*r I price low and easy terms.
■Î* I Harr y Ra wso n. j _
* ' FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODERN
residence; choice location, corner lot.
di_ c c? ■ t
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam Stlvey.
2S5-tf.
4l
Phone 82L.
291 tf
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
244tf
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
f FOR SALE — 80 ACRES THREE
miles east of Moscow ; house and barn.
Write E. R. Fuller, Lewiston, Idaho, or
see N. G. Gilbertson, adjoining farm. 6tf
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE—HAY, THREE TONS OF
timothy and two tons grain, at $30;
two tons alfalfa at $23. at the barn on
the S. T. Silvey place ; can deliver.
Phone 9417. Walter Landgon.
11-15
FOR SALE OR TRADE, CHEAP—
one wood heater in good repair. Phone
138L,
10-15
evenings.
FOR SALE—SHOATS, FIVE AND
six months' old. Phone 9351.
10tf
FOR SALE — RANGE STOVE,
chairs, stand table, dining table, kitchen
cabinet, bedstead, springs and refriger
Phone 112R.
8-14
FOR SALE—ELECTRIC RANGE
and household goods. 115 N. Jack
son. Phone 150 J.
as
at
at
at
8-13
FOR SALE—HOUSEHOLD FURNI
ture, very cheap for few davs only.
222 South Lilly St. _ 293tf
/INLINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tf
FOR SALE—1 DEERING BINDER;
sell for cash or trade in stock. M. J.
Schu, Moscow, Idaho. Rt. 3.
244tf
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
235-tf
kane. Wash.
FOR SALE—BEAN HARVESTER
for sale. Has been used very
little and is good as new. Price $40.
Write or phone Garfield Fruit & Pro
duce company, Garfield, Wash.
297-tf
"HE CAME BACK."—IF YOU HAVE
any old carpets you wish woven into
beautiful, fluffy rugs, notify S. A. Dob
ncr. Idaho Hotel. Phone'295. lltf
FOR SALE—Live Stock
FOR SALE — A FRESH
Phone 937K6.
COW.
11-12
FOR SALE — LINCOLN RAM
lambs, Frank Wallen. Phone 926X6.
4-16
FIVE REGISTERED HOLSTEIN
Freisen cows, high producing and
testing; also one pure bred Holstein
bull calf. Priced right for quick sale.
Address Wm. Hennen, Moscow. Phone
9237.
tf
FOR SALE—10 HEAD OF HORSES.
buggies, harness and wagons, cheap.
Phone 28. George W. Stewart.
IF YOU WANT A TEAM OR MORE
of good young horses, call on W. F.
Sponsler, or phone 9377, Moscow. 5-11
FOR SALE—A COW; WILL BE
fresh soon. Phone 9238. 291tf
301 tf

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