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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 11, 1918, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
n* VOLUME Vin MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY. IDAHO FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1918 • NUMBER 11
GERMANS DROWN 600 WHILE ASKING PEACE
The kaiser has called all of the sovereigns of German states to meet in
Berlin to consider President Wilson's reply to the German peace note.
The reichstag has been summoned to meet tomorrow to take up the ques
tion of peace and formulate an answer to the president's note. *
In the meantime the allies are smashing the western front and the Ger
man army of 260,000 men is in complete rout with the British, French
American, Belgian and Italian forces crowding them forward toward the
German frontier. It is not believed the German defensive lines can hold
■out much longer and a general retreat all along the line is expected almost
daily.
In the United States preparations are going forward with a rush as if
"the war were expected to last for years. Announcement is made that more
than 1,900,000 American troops have been sent to France and that the war
department is preparing to send two million more.
Fallowing are the telegraphic and cable dispatches received today.
Kaiser Calls Council to Consider Peace Plans.
AMSTERDAM.—Emperor William of Germany, has summoned the sov
ereigns of all German federal states to Berlin for a consultation before
answering President Wilson's note, according to a dispatch from Cologne.
Such a conference is unique in German history.
Americans and British Take More Towns.
LONDON.—(Official.)—Americans operating with the British southeast
of Cambrai last night completed the capture of Vaux-Andigny and St. Houp
let.
The river Selle was crossed by the British north of Le Chateau. Fight
ing is going on in the eastern section of that town.
Immediately east of Cambrai the British have reached the outskirts of
v the village of St. Vaast and St. Aubert.
French and Italians Take Important Points.
PARIS. —(Official.)—The French last night advanced in the region north
of the Aisne and captured the towns of Chivy and Moulins and then pushed
heyond these points.
Italian forces have reached a point south of Courtecon on the Chemins
des Dames which highway the French gained possession of as far as the
heights of Cerny-en-Laonndis.
In Champagne the French have crossed the river Suippe and gained a
footing between St. Etienne and Boalt-sur-Suippe as well as Warmeriville
and Vandetre and St. Masms.
Farther east the French pursuing the Germans who are in full retreat
have made great gains.
On the front west of Argonne forest the French infantry have captured
Semide and Mont St. Martin. The French also stormed Corbon and Erieres.
Kaiser Opposed Peace Proposal Made to Wilson.
LONDON.—Chancellor Maximilian's peace proposal was made in direct j
opposition to Emperor William's views, according to a neutral who left
Germany a few days ago.
Americans Started Drive Before Daylight.
WITH THE AMERICAN FORCES NORTHWEST OF VERDUN, Noon,
today.—Heavy artillery firing west of the Meuse began early. The Ameri
cans started action before daylight. a
bardment. Fires in many towns behind the German lines are believed to
have been started by American shell fire.
German Situation on West Front Growing Desperate.
LONDON.—Battle front advices indicate that it 'is virtually certain the
Germans will have to evacuate S. Gobian forests almost immediately.
The Germans are now evacuating Chemin des Dames under pressure of
the converging attacks west and south of it.
The Hunding line behind Laon and between the two rivers Serre and
Soissonne has been turned, making the German situation in the Laon area
most desperate.
In Champagne the French and Ameriacns have joined hands north of
Argonne in Grandpre gap and occupied Grandpre station while patrols en
tered the town itself.
On the river Meuse the Americans cleared out a pocket in the direction
of Sivry which held them up a long time.
Will Send 4,000,000 Americans to France.
WASHINGTON.—American troops sent overseas have now passed the
1,900,000 mark, General March, chief of staff announced today.
The present is no time to hang back, General March said in appealing
to the country to support the fourth Liberty loan. He said the nation's
maximum resources and men and money must be hurled at the Hun to make
victory certain.
While the movement of soldiers overseas is continuing the war depart
ment is preparing another 2,000,000 men to follow the first 2,000,000.
department has asked congress for $8,000,000,000 to carry out this program.
General March said the Ninety-first division, composed of Alaska, Wash
ington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Wyoming and Utah
national army is still in American training areas.
Germans Take Archbishop Prisoner.
ON THE BRITISH FRONT IN FRANCE.—(By Havas News Agency.)—
Monsignor Chollet, archbishop of Cambrai, was carried away by the Ger
mans when they evacuated Cambrai.
Allies Demolish Remnants of German Defense Lines.
PARIS.—(By Associated Press.)—The British continued to advance today
under favorable conditions and captured St. Hilaire lez Cambrai, Avesnes
and St. Aubert. Many prisoners were taken and much booty captured.
North of Rheims the French are holding both banks of the Suippe and
have captured Berticourt.
The Italian and French forces, working together, have captured Court
econ, Troyon and South Laon.
. The Americans have completed the work of cleaning up the Argonne
'forest. Not a German remains in the wooded area this afternoon.
American Casualties 844.
There are 844 names in today's casualty lists, which includes 18 in the
Marine corps. One Idaho boy, Clifford Borden, of Hazelton, Idaho, is named
among the severely wounded. The list issued for morning papers follows:
Kjll ed in action, 91; missing in action, 28; wounded severely, 200; died
^fevounds, 62; died from accident and other causes, 6; died of disease, 29;
eQp'om aeroplane accident, 3; prisoners, 6; total, 426.
Afternoon List.—Killed in action, 91; missing in action, 37; wounded se
verely, 170; died of wounds, 62; died of accident and other causes, 4; died
of disease, 29; wounded slightly, 2; prisoners, 6; total 401.
Marine Cjrps Casualties.—Killed in action, 14; wounded in action, se
verely, 2; missing in action, 2; total, 18.
The
fr
di
INFLUENZA SITUATION
Moscow has no cases of Spanish in
fluenza, so far as known, and the
most rigid enforcement of regulations
to prevent the disease from becoming
established here have been ordered
by the authorities,
must be private and no assemblages
of people except in the schools, will
be permitted. The proclamation by
the city health officer, Dr. W. A.
Adair, elsewhere in this issue tells
what must be done in Moscow.
This city is fortunate in escaping
the disease so far. Spokane has more
than 100 cases and "has had several
Even funerals
deaths. Colfax has 14 cases, it is
reported and has had one death. The
county fair at Colfax was not held
this week although everything was in
readiness for it, but the influenza
caused the closing of the fair, a great
event for Whitman county.
Pullman has 25 cases and the
churches, schools, pool halls, lodges,
and Washington State College has
been closed. All classes have been
dismissed. The question of holding
ooen air drills and training for the
men of the S. A. T. C. at Pullman
was left to the discretion of the army
AND 600 LIVES ARE LOST
DUBLIN.—It is believed that 600 lives were lost in the sinking of the
mail steamer Leinster by a torpedo in the Irish sea yesterday. Only about
150 of those on board are reported saved.
officers. It is to avoid such a situa
tion here that the rigid enforcement
of the rules forbidding meetings in
Moscow are being urged.
Endicott, west of Colfax, has many
cases and has had two deaths from
the disease. Spokane closes all pub
lic places including the schools and
is fighting a spread of the disease
with all available means.
Mayor Truitt says that the schools
will be permitted to continue as long
as it is not regarded as dangerous
for them to do so, but if it becomes
necessary to close the schools this
will be done.
PLANNING PICNIC
OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST IN
IDAHO'S GREAT EDUCATION
AL INSTITUTION
The young women of the university
and members of the Faculty club are
eagerly looking forward to the Co-ed
picnic, which is to be given next Satur
day afternoon by the Home Economics
girls. All those who are expecting to
attend arc requested to meet at Riden
baugh hall at 2:00 p. m. From there
they will be taken to the ^mountains in
cars. A fee of 25 cents will be charged.
As a safeguard against the spreading
of disease, Lieutenant Kotalek has issued
an order that all lights be put out and
that there be perfect quiet in all student
residences after 10 ;30 p. m. ; also that |
there be non-attendance at any public
Miss Ruth Coffee, who was. called
home by the death of her brother, re
turned to the university yesterday. Miss
Coffee is a pledge member of the Gam
ma Phi Beta sorority.
PATRIOTIC WINDOW j
_ „ .*—:—:— „ .... . j
One of the best pieces of patriotic
window dressing seen in Moscow is
Lnat of the Hub store on west Main
street. One of the large snow win
clows is decorated witn the national
colors and Liberty loan emblems, that
are strikingly arranged and attract
a great deal of attention. The appeal
to buy bonds is so great in this dis
that it cannou nelp having a good
etlect in stimulating the purenase ot
bonds. The work is artistic and ap
pealing.
,
HUB STORE HAS FINE
4 J. J. DAY OFFERS
* MOSC
;■
Stock Bring High Prices.
The Harry Skattaboe sale netted
$2578.70. A span of gray horses were
sold for $382.00 to James Dye. A
span of bays brought $354 from John
Ott. One yearling colt sold for $100 j
to Clifford Olson. A cow sold for ,
v<)4. I j
4' * 4• 'S* 4> 4» 4* 4" 4* 4* 4 1 4*
v
JV $30,000 ❖ I
4^ :
Jerome J. Day has doubled the 4« I
4* offer he made to Latah county 4* j
4" and Moscow in the third Liberty "s' I
Ho offers to take $30,000 4* [
4* worth of bonds of the fourth 4*
4* Liberty loan if that sum will 4* j
4* complete Moscow's and Latah 4> j
4- county's quota. He has author- 4 1 \
4* ized Harry Whittier, cashier of 4 1 1
4- the Moscow State Bank, to take 4* j
4* $30,000 worth of the bonds for 4*
4* and county come within $30,000 4 1
4* of their quota Mr. Day will make ■>
4' up the remainder. This is a*
4* strong incentive to reach the 4*
4* goal and the committee is going 4*
4* to urge every one who has not 4*
4* taken bonds to do so at once and 4 1
4* those who have subscribed to 4 1
4; take mere bonds, increasing their 4
4- subscriptions so that the town 4*
4 1 and county may not be disgraced 4 1
by failing to meet their quotas. 4 >
•pB&t2,^*£«a|*4l««|B>|>^*2i4 a 4*4 > 4 > 4 > 4"
4>
•v
4- loan.
4 1 him if the conditions are met. 4>
This means that if the town 4 1
4
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(CopTrUM
WAR FOR FREEDOM
IDAHO TOWN PUT THE KAISER
AND HIS ALLIES ON THE
TOBOGGAN SLIDE
Some are inclined to give the credit
for winning the war to General Foch;
others give the United States the
credit and there are others who claim
that all of the nations engaged in
fighting the kaiser and his allies are
entitled to equal credit. But it has
just been learned that an Idaho coun
ty council of defense is really res
ponsible for putting the skids under
the kaiser and starting the stampede
for peace.
To Lewiston, Idaho the Credit Belongs
And here is how it happened. Lew
iston has a wise council of defense.
It is not only wise but patriotic and
studious. It got together and studied
the situation. It saw a way to win
the war and, without a flourish of
trumpets or the tinkling of brass, it
went to work quietly to win the war
and it succeeded.
'Gasoline. That was the keynote
to the situation. Cut off gasoline and
the war would be ended. So an or
der was issued that no gasoline was
to be sold on Sunday.
No notice was given the public.
The order was issued Saturday night
that no gasoline would be sold, no
work done on automobiles, no auto
mobile accessories would be sold from
midnight, Saturday, until midnight,
Sunday.
A resident of an adjoining state
reached Lewiston Sunday evening in
his car. He was nearly out of gaso
line. He wanted to come to Moscow,
j ie had n0 £ en ough gasoline to
dimb the Lew iston grade to Union
£ 0wn w here a supply could be ob
billed. He pleaded with the man
a „ ers 0 f several Lewiston garages,
but in vain- They were f irm i n their
resolution to help win the war. "The
f e( j era | government has forbidden us
£ 0 se j| g aso ijne on Sunday and we
canno t take any chances" was the
stereotyped answer to the pleas for
jr aso jj n e
ë
But one garage manager, wiser
than the others, solved the problem.
"Wait until midnight and we will sell
you all the supplies you want," he
said.
.
There was nothing else to do. The
man waited until the clock struck 12,
secured a supply of gasoline and
came on to Moscow. He had to be
here Monday morning. He was not
unpatriotic, but he did not under
stand that by waiting a few hours for
his gasoline he would be an instru
ment in winning the war, but he wait
ed. He got his gasoline and drove
north, pondering on the wisdom of
the Lewiston council of defense.
But he saw that these men were
"wise beyond their day and genera
tion." In a few days (just long
enough for the news of the action of
the Lewiston council of defense to
reach Bulgaria) word came that Bul
garia had surrendered uncondition
ally. It took a few days longer for
the word to reach Turkey, but when
the Turks learned that no gasoline
was sold in Lewiston until after mid
night, peace offers were sent to the
allies. Austria would not believe that
Lewiston had done this_ and is still
investigating and when it learns that
it is a fact, that the traveler had to
wait until after midnight for his gas
there can be no doubt that Austria
will _ surrender. Even the kaiser is
considering abdicating.
Great is Lewiston. All honor to
her and her council of defense.
LATAH COUNTY STILL LACKS
$388,TOO OF HER QUOTA
t + + 4 , + , ! , + + + + + t + + t + +
OFFICIAL NOTICE
*

+
+
Notice is hereby given to all +
4» persons concerned that because ♦
+ of an epidemic form of Spanish +
4* influenza having made its appear- 4>
4* ance in localities near Moscow, if +
4* not in the city, therefore, for ♦
4> civic and military reasons, and *
4 1 also in compliance with the of- 4*
♦ ficial order of the state board 4'
4> of health; it is hereby ordered ♦
+ that all public assemblages and 4*
♦ places of amusement, except pri- 4 1
4* vate and public schools, are pro- 4*
4* hibited from meeting, or operat- 4»
+ ing, on and after Friday, Octob- 4*
♦ er 11, 1918, until further order. +
Dated at Moscow, Idaho, Oc- ♦
4* tober 11, 1918.
4
.
+
4*
W. A. ADAIR 4*
City Health Officer 4«
4>*4 + 4 l *4 , * + 4*t4t4 + t
+
IDAHO STUDENTS
WILL BUY BONDS
GOVERNOR ALEXANDER TELLS
SPOKANE NEWSPAPER OF
PATRIOTISM SHOWN HERE
Each of the 600 members of the
students' army training corps at the
University of Idaho voluntarily
pledged himself to buy a $50 Liberty
bond next pay day, when reviewed
on the university campus yesterday
by Governor Moses Alexander of
Idaho, who was at the Davenport last
night. Others of the student body
and members of the also
agreed to purchase bonds and Gover
nor Alexander estimates that the
subscriptions from the institution
will reach nearly $50,000.
"It was one of the most inspiring
things that I ever witnessed when
the soldier-students in a body an
nounced their intention to subscribe,
to the Liberty loan," said Governor
Alexander. "These men are not only
giving their time to the government
for but a small remuneration as com
pared to that they could command in
other lines of work, but they are also
offering their lives as well. It seems
to me that such a demonstration of
loyalty to country should induce pri
vate citizens of means to respond
more generously to the nation's ap
peal for financial aid."—Spokesman
Review.
CALLED BY DEATH
MRS. MARY STRATTON DIED AT
EARLY HOUR THIS MORNING
—PR1YATE FUNERAL
Mrs. Mary N. Stratton died at her
home on South Jefferson this morn
ing at 7:30. Mrs. Stratton was eighty
two years of age and was born in
Prince Edward Island, Canada. She
was certainly a pioneer having come
to Idaho about forty years ago. Her
husband has been dead about twenty
years.
She leaves a brother, Henry Mc
Gregor of Moscow, who is also a
pioneer, having located as a home
stead, part of the present site of
Moscow; also a sister, Mrs. M. C.
True of Colfax and two brothers and
one sister in the east. Her funeral
will fcs private at Grice's undertak
ing parlors at two o'clock on Friday,
but there will be a service at the
grave where all friends are invited.
This arrangement is necessary on ac
count of the order prohibiting public
gatherings. Rev. H. O. Perry of the
Methodist church will conduct the
services.
29 SOLDIERS LEFT
FOR SOUTH TODAY
FOUR GO TO CAMP HANCOCK
AND 25 TO CAMP McARTHUR
—LEFT AT 3:06 P. M.
Twenty-nine of the men who have
been at the University of Idaho for the i
past eight weeks left, today for Georgia,
Four of them went to Camp Hancock j
and the other 25 went to Camp Me
Arthur, where they will be engaged in I
special war work for some time. The \
men left over the Northern Pacific at j
3:06 this afternoon, going via Spokane, j
Sergeant John Myers and wife were I
entertained at luncheon at noon today !
by Mrs. Anna Warnecke, who had the |
table and the dining room decorated in ;
the national colors. Sergeant Meyer- '
gocs to Camp Hancock. Mrs. Myers
will remain in Moscow for the winter or
Until her husband is located definitely
j'at some point when she will join him.
Will Latah county raise her quota in
the fourth Liberty loan drive or will the
county, the city and the university be
disgraced ?
These questions are worrying more
than one head in Moscow and Latah
county. When the last reports were
footed up the county lacked $388,700 of
having its quota raised and most of the
large subscriptions were in. Mark P.
Miller today gave $10.000, which gave
the drive a big boost and places Moscow
well above 50 per cent of her quota, but
outside of Moscow the county is a little
below 50 per cent.
Reports have not been received from
several outside towns for several days
and none reported for yesterday. When
these reports are received it is believed
they will add much to the county's total.
Jerome J. Day has offered $30,000 if
the county raises its quota, and with this
inducement the committee is going to
work harder than ever.
The sales since the last list was pub
lished, with names of buyers and amounts
taken, follow :
Mark P. Miller Milling Co... .$10,000.00
T. J. Mavnard .
John E. Hall.
Ed. Beard ..
Alfred Schedin ...
D. H. Vanderpool.
James Nifong .
John Hansen .
Einar Thompson .
Mrs. H. L. Haynes.
Nils BJorklund .
Elmer F. Anderson.
John A. Anderson .
John H. Hudson.
R. T. Heiland .
W. A. Nelson .
Harry and Henry Hattan....
Mrs. Theodore Mortensen....
C. W, Brown ..
T. A. Brown .
Robert Lundquist .
1. P. Thompson .
N. A. Nelson .
100.00
200.00
50.00
50.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
250.00
200.00
50.00
150.00
50.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
100.00
500.00
50.00
500.00
200.00
H. O. Field .
Andrew Ahrahamson .
Thomas Ahrahamson .
Nelson A. Cooper.
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Wood....
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Crowley.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Cole.
John J. Jacksha, Jr.
Dorothy Taylor .
Glen Higgins ..
George M. Miller .
Willard H. Eller.
A. E. Evans .
Fred Murphy, Jr.
M. F. Angel .
J. Hugo Johnson .
Carl M. Smith .
Isabelle Stevens .............
Fred Skog-.
I. E. Gray .
G W. Suppiger .
Lyle Drury ..
John Randall, Jr.
Chas. Peterson .
O. A. Olson .
M. W. Morse .
Annie M. Morse .
Chas. Crowe .
Don Piper .
Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Boemeke..
Earl S. Barton .
Mrs. E. E. Calkins.
May Calkins Nessly .
Dcssie R. Barrows.
Mary E. Bartley.
T. W. Bartley .
Alva Blaylock .
J. E. Blaylock .
Nels Brood.
Flovd Cox .
Robert H. Cox .
Floyd W. Gail .
R. TTodgins .
E N. Humphrey .
Elizabeth A. Keane .
Teman Kjarstad .
Harold Lenhard .
O. McCarter .
John Olson .
Olaf Paulson .
Flovd Peasley .
Air. and Mrs. Joseph C. Pierce.
L. Olive Rayburn.
C. E Schuh .
Win. Staples .
W. A. Van Tilborg.
H. P. Bakkenson .
Mrs. C. C. Brown.
Rav Carter .
Wm. Crew .
W. J. Humphrey .
Ethel Jones._.
Theodore Lundquist .
Ralph Duke Patterson.
Wade Alexander Patterson...
vile Patterson.......
100.00
50.00
100.00
50.00
500.00
150.00
500.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
300,00
100.00
300.00
50.00
500.00
200.00
100.00
200.00
50.00
300.00
400,00
50,00
100,00
50.00
50.00
200.00
200.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
100.00
50.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
100.00
50.00
50.00
200.00
500,00
50.00
">00 00 ■
50.00
100.00
200,00
900 00
50.00
50.00
300.00
50.00
150.00
100.00
200.00
200.00
50.00
150.00
200 00
100.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
50.00-
50.00
100.00
100.00
50.00
100.00
200.00
100.00
50.00
$
'
Wm
Ida Perry .
J. G, Vennigerholz ...
F, E Ankenev.
L. Beardsley ..
.san
L. J. Fogle ..
H. Kalinouwski .... .
Roy Moore .
Joseph Van Buskirk .
BANKS WILL BE OPEN
TOMORROW AS USUAL
_
ciderl to remain open tomorrow ( Si.tur
day) despite the fact that it is a legal
holiday and help those who want to buy
'-ends. The law makes tomorrow a holi
day in Idaho. President Wilson has
asked that it he made a holiday every
where. But Moscow hankers want to
see the fourth Liberty loan quota raised
and will deny themselves the holiday
and remain open as usual to help the
farmers who come to town buy, bonds,
T ' - " 't ihefn do this in vain. Go to
the bank and take more bonds tomorrow,
Moscow and Latah county are far bc
low their quota. Do your duty tomor
The three hanks of Moscow have de
row !

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