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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 16, 1918, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1918.
NUMBER 16
VOLUME VIII
GERMANY PANIC STRICKEN BY WILSON S REPLY
?
"Like a douche of cold water on our hopes of peace" is the way German
papers speak of President Wilson's refusal to treat with the kaiser and
rejected the offer of an armistice. A panic was caused in German banking
and financial circles while throughout the countries of our allies there is the
greatest rejoicing over the knowledge that the war is to go on until kaiserism
is dead.
The United States has redoubled its efforts to get men and munitions to
the front and is preparing for a long war. Germany announces that its re
sources and men will be mobolized and the draft age limit raised (it is now
66) and Germany will prepare for a bitter war.
Everything today points to renewed activities in the fighting with Germany
making a last, but desperate stand within her own borders and nowhere is
the hope held out that the war will end before 1919.
The Germans are still trying "frightfulness" even in their defeat and today
renewed the long distance bombardment of the city of Dover, England, across
the narrowest part of the English channel, killing a number of civilians. This
•will be added to Germany's final account in the last reckoning, when she is
completely defeated. *
■WASHINGTON.— Substantial gains on both sides of the Meuse against
.. , . » « _. , ä u ,, . ~ _ ,_ ,
the most stubborn resistance by greatly reemforced enemy forces, is reported
by General Pershing' for Tuesday.
Reports that for two months the kaiser has wished to abdicate but was
prevented from doing so by the German empress are being circulated.
Congress appropriated more than six billion dollars to enlarge the war
program today and it looks like at least another year of fighting. The tele
graphic and cable reports received, today follow.
Wilson's Reply Causes Financial Panic in Germany.
.LONDON. —-President Wilson's reply to the German peace note produced
« "most unfavorable impression" in Berlin, says an Amsterdam dispatch.
The publication of the reply was followed by a panic in Berlin banking
circles and on the stock exchange.
The German supreme command will come to Berlin at the end of the week
"to deliberate on mobilization and concentration of the national strength
and the raising of the military draft age" is the announcement made.
Americans Make Substantial Gains.
British Advance Near Lille
LONDON.—(Official.) —British patrols gained ground during last night
in the Douai-Lille sector, it is officially announced this morning.
Belgian King Defeating German Forces.
LONDON.—Belgian forces under King Albert are advancing rapidly along
the Fortemarck-Thorout road. The fall of the Belgian town of Thorout, the
capture of which was prematurely announced unofficially yesterday, is ex
pected almost immediately.
Weather Conditions Improve and Help Allied Armies.
WITH THE BRITISH ARMIES IN FLANDERS.—(By Associated Press.)
—Allied armies resumed attacks in Flanders and made noticeable advances
»!■
today. Clearing weather has aided the offensive.
Cavalry is operating well in advance and is now half way to Thielt and
Pittsem. The Belgians stormed and took the town of Bousbecque and are
now fighting in the streets of Halluin, south of Menin.
They have reached the outskirts of Harlebecke and captured Lichter
velde where there was very heavy resistance but this was overcome and
the allies are now beyond that town.
Thorout Taken by Allies Today.
LONDON.—The Belgian city of Thorout, a very important point, was
taken by the allies today. The fall of Court Rais is imminent.
Germans Bombard Dover—Kill Civilians.
*
WITH THE FRENCH FORCES IN FLANDERS.—Germans resumed the
long range bombardment of Dover on the "straits today. Some civilians
Were killed.
,-t£LA -
Berlin Admits Continued Retirement.
BERLIN.—(Official.)—German forces in Nortyerhn France have with
drawn their lines in the district west and southwest of Lille.
Renewed American attacks between Argonne and Meuse failed. East of
the Meuse the American attacks resulted in engagements which resulted in
favor of the Germans.
French Aviator Shot by Germans.
AMSTERDAM.—Lieutenant Roland G. Garros, noted French aviator who
was posted as missing on October 7 after a flight over the German lines,
was shot down and killed, October 4, a message from Berlin announces.
British Freighter Sunk in Collision.
NEW YORK.—The British freighter, Port Philip, was sunk in collision
with a United States war vessel in the lower bay. The crew was rescued.
- Maximilian to Reply to Wilson's Note.
LONDON.—It is expected that Prince Maximilian, German chancellor,
Will make a decision today on President Wilson's reply, says a Copenhagen
dispatch.
German newspapers point out that the president's note had the effect
bf a cold douche on German hopes for peace which had been engendered
by the first note.
Bbttle newspapers comment in sharpest terms, êâÿiflg the president's
language has now become excited since he conferred with the allies.
French Take Important Village.
PARIS.—(Official.)—The French last night captured the village of Acy
Romano, within a mile of the important railway junction of Rethel in Cham
pagne and made further progress north of Sissone, while between Sissone
and Bethel they repulsed violent counter attacks near St. Germain Mont.
British Enter Lille.
PARIS.—British patrols have entered the southwestern suburbs of Lille,
"the most important point held in that section by the Germans who have
been defending it desperately.
Belgian Cavalry Nearing Thielt.
BRITISH HEADQUARTERS IN FLANDERS.—Belgian cavalry today is
•reported within one mile of the important railway ceirter of Thielt, about
T6 miles southwest of Ghent.
Czecho-Slovak Revolt in Bohemia.
PARIS.—Meetings called by the Czecho-Slovak council at Prague to pro
test against exporting food stuffs from Bohemia resulted in a general
strike which is developing into a revolt, according to Zurich dispatches.
Martial law has been proclaimed throughout the country. German and
.Hungarian troops are occupying Prague and other cities.
Serbians Take Important Heights.
•(■Official.)—Serbian forces advancing north of Nish Sunday
»captured on a large front, all of the heights which dominate both banks of
the Morava river.
LONDON.
House Appropriates $6,345,755,,000 For War.
WASHINGTON.—The military deficiency bill carrying $6,346,755,000
Tor an enlarged war program was reported to the house by the appropriations
committee today.
The house gave immediate consideration to the military deficiency bill.
Leaders said the measure will be passed tomorrow.
American Casualties, 837.
There are 837 names in the American casualty lists issued today. The
list issued for morning papers follows:
Killed in action, 68; missing in action, 34; wounded severely, 182; died
■of wounds, 31; died of accident and other t causes, 1; died of disease, 26;
•died from aeroplane accident, 1; wounded, degree undetermined, 67; wounded
slightly, 1; total, 401.
Afternoon List.—Killed in action, 62; missing in action, 35; wounded se
verely, 182; died of wounds, 31; died from accident and other causes, 4;
•died Of disease, 26; wounded in action, degree undetermined, 106; total, 436.
Idaho's Roll of Honor.
Three Idaho soldiers are named in today's casualty lists,
supreme sacrifice and one is severely wounded.
Floyd R. Ravis, of Midvale, Idaho, died of disease; Logan H. Bennett, of
Two made the
ONLY ONE-FIFTH OF MEN EX
PECTED YESTERDAY ARRIVED
—OTHERS COME TODAY
Only about sixty of the 300 soldiers
expected here from Idaho and Wyom
ing reached Moscow yesterday. These
came from points in Idaho and none
of the Wyoming men reached Mos
cow. The university authorities have
not been notified why the entire 300
are rt 0 a a ioss V to°undeïst d a U nd unies* 1
be that the influnez^ sUuaUon pre
vented many of them from coming.
Those wno arrived yesterday came
mostly from north Idaho counties, and
the south Idaho contingent may reach
here tonight or tomorrow morning,
Nothing has been heard from any
those who were to arrive nor were the
university authorities notified that
they would not be here as scheduled.
The nonarrival of the men is not
unwelcome, however, for it gives more
time to prepare for them. There
such a shortage of help that the work
of preparing th« buildings necessary
for their accommodation has been de
layed. Yesterday morning the work
of preparing the kitchen and mess
hall at the plant of the Idaho Na
tional Harvester company, where
these men are to be f edj was no
nearly done. Not a table had been
prepared nor had the range and cook
ing equipments been completed. Yet
supper was served there to the 60
men who arrived during the day. The
work of completing the kitchen and
mess hall was almost phenomenal.
While it Is not entirely complete suf
ficient progress has been made to
guarantee proper feeding of the men
there, although the entire equipment
is not in place.
The barracks, which were entirely
bare yesterday morning, had cots and
equipment for 200 men in place last
night and the 60 who arrived slept
comfortably in the new building. A
large hot air furnace in the center
of the building made it quite com
fertable.
Today all is hurry and bustle in
this building, and more cots are being
fitted up. Lieutenant Bleamaster,
former athletic director of the Uni
versity of Idaho, is in charge here
and is getting things rapidly into
shape. By tomorrow everything here,
excepting the plumbing will be com
plete. It will be several days before
the last of the lavatories are in place
and the shower baths all in readi
ness for use.
' The new arrivals are working like
Trojans to help get their quarters* in
shape and to get located. Great
stacks of army blankets and uiforms
are piled in the officers' headquarters
in this building and are issued as re
quired. •
Great care is being exercised to
prevent any cases of influenza reach
ing the university. Last night the
kitchen at the harvester plant was
not prepared to cook the entire sup
per for the men so food was cooked
at the mess halls at the university and
brought to the harvester plant. There
is not a single case of influenza
among the 600 men at the university I

and the authorities were taking no
chances of them being exposed by
permitting the new arrivals, who may
have been exposed to the disease en
route to Moscow, to eat at the uni
versity. The men who have arrived
all have a "clean bill of health" but
as they come from many points and
some of them have traveled long dis
tances it was feared they might have
come in contact with the disease and
the greatest care is being taken to
keep them from the men at the uni
versity Who are in quarantine. The
men are given a physical examina
tion upon arrival here*
Despite the hurry arid bustle of
getting the new quarters ready and
getting located in their quarters, the
young men all seem cheerful and en
thusiastic. Every one is anxious to
"get a chance to go to the front" and
all are hoping that premature peace
will not be made with Germany. Bul
letins about the war are eagerly scan
ned by the new arrivals.
Moscow women presented the mess
hall with a lot of canned fruits and
jellies and today the men issued a*
SECRETARY BAKER APPEALS
TO PUT THE LOAN OVER
f
BAN FRANCISCO, Cal.—To Commanding Officer, S. A. T. G., U. of L,
Moscow, Idaho. Following telegram from the War Department, dated Octob
er 14, repeated for necessary action:
"Following telegram has been received: There never was a more critical
time in the history of the war than the present. Overseas American valor
and efficiency are carrying the bann» of triumphant democracy with
sistless force toward German soil. The ardor of the fighting line must not
be cooled and the wonderful incentive and spirt of our soldiers must not
be dulled by any failure to carry the fourth Liberty loan victoriously
the top. The people at home must show that they are as resolute as the
soldiers at the front are brave. No influence is so potent in its stimulating
effect on the people of our country as the example of the men with the
colors.
re
over
Let every American soldier and every American officer do his duty
not only by subscribing himself but by urging those at home to subscribe.
BAKER, (Secretary of War)."
in
Albion, Idaho, died of accident and Charles B. Billups, of Nezperce, is re
ported severely wounded.
for
vote of thanks to the women of Mos
cow for the delicacies which were
greatly appreciated.
*
COUNTY GALLS SO
three da y® of next week - calling 35
each for Monday and Tuesday, Oc-j
tober 21 and 22 and 20 for Wednes
day, October 23. The list ot those
called follows. They must appear for
physical examination Dn the dates
mentioned.
List Called for October 21st.
Fred Christensen, Spokane, Wash,
Harry Hermiston, Palouse, Wash.
Charles Virgil Maxfield, Moscow.
D. W. Burfie|d, Spring Valley, Minn
Edward Merica, Tacoma, Wash.
Guy Edgar Harris, Moscow.
Earl Berry, Moscow.
Edward A. Mordhorst, Moscow.
Antonia Petrone, St. Paul, Minn.
Elmer Paine Thurston, Moscow.
George Albert Pecard, Glengary.
Ross Benrod Reeder, Moscow.
Merritt Vernon Penwell, Moscow.
Lawrence Peter Warneke, Moscow.
Lee Leo Jaborra, Moscow.
Clarence Floyd O'Neil, Moscow.
Colonel McIntyre, Moscow.
Thomas Shea, Moscow.
Philip Lettenmaier, Moscow.
George Dewey Edwards, Moscow.
Gilbert Kilde, Moscow.
John William Comstock, Moscow.
Edward Henry Davidson, Moscow.'
Posy Wedle, Moscow.
John Lebori Fairfield, Dent.
Thomas M- Wright, Moscow.
John ReidséWû, Holland, Mich.
Albert Benj. Root, Moscow.
Clarence Franklin Bost, Moscow.
Daniel Erwin Whitcomb, Potlatch.
Wallace Wm. Whitcomb, Potlatch,
Angelo Minato, Potlatch.
Anton Walser, Palouse, Wash.
Sam Piccolo, Potlatch.
Aubrey E. Greer, Palouse, Wash.
List Called for October 22.
Chas. Walter West, Potlatch.
Norman Leslie Lamb, Denver, Colo.
William Ray Nolan, Garfield.
Ernest Thos. Kirkpatrick, Garfield,
Waldo E. Terteling, Potlatch.
David Dewey Boyer, Potlatch.
Lester Layton, Potlatch.
Herbert Floyd Cone, Potlatch.
Emil Potlatch.
THIRTY-FIVE EACH TO TAKE
PHYSICAL EXAMINATION
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
The local draft board has called 90
more men for examination the first
Clarence Roy Elsea, Potlatch.
William B. Newman, Potlatch.
Clarence H. Burrows, Potlatch.
Henry A. Fredevickson, Potlatch,
Isac Everett Smith, Potlatch.
Thorval Henry Johnson, Potlatch.
George Baduke, Potlatch.
Paneote P. Cholacoff, Potlatch.
Harry Lee Roach, Potlatch.
George Anshutz, Potlatch.
Henry A. Swanson, Potlatch.
Bernard Edw. O'Reilly, Potlatch.
William S. Starner, Potlatch.
George Kelsey Moody, Potlatch.
Will Henry West, Potlatch.
Archibald Earl Johnson, Potlatch.
Alvin P. Egan, Potlatch.
William Edw. Schmidt, Potlatch.
John Roscoe Jones, Potlatch.
Chas. Theo. Humiston, Potlatch.
John Henry Schmidt, Potlatch.
Marvin Wm. Gilliam, Potlatch.
Robert B. Swadener, Moscow.
John Rubin Brood, Moscow.
Vernon Theo. Lindquist, Moscow. |
Henry Olson, Moscow. '
List Called for October 23.
Mirt Hunmphreys, Moscow.
Harry Martin Mortensen, Moscow.
Joshua Arthur Holden, Moscow.
Philip Showalter, Moscow.
Albert Wery, Moscow,
Wilfred Chas. Bleamaster, Moscow.
James Wm. Fowler, Juliaetta.
Charles Robt. Moore, Spokane, Wn.
Marion E. Porter, Juliaetta.
Walter Thomas Bumpass, Genesêé.
John O'Reilly, Potlatch.
Hugh Ross Abel, Moscow.
Charles Malloy, Potlatch.
Carl Mon/oe Smith, Juliaetta.
John Harvey Flowers, Moscow.
Dell Morris, Potlatch.
Francis Edmund Kerby, Moscow.
Jacob William Briscoe, Orangeville.
William Howard Hamilton, Nampa.
George Chas. Dissault, Pocatello.
I
;
H CO I »
BOND SLACKERS
I COUNTY COUNCIL OF DEFENSE
GOES AFTER THOSE WHO TAKE
- -^_QUOfA
| Two men who had not taken their
i quota of the fourth Liberty loan were
called before the county council of
defense last night to explain why.
Frank Clarke, wealthy retired farmer
who has been acting as special police
man in Moscow, was the first man
"on the carpet." Mr. Clarke stated
that he owns 350 acres of land worth
! at a conservative estimate, $100 per
acre, and a house in town which cost
him $1300 and he has $600 in the
bank and does not owe a dollar. He
had taken $260 of the third loan, had
taken none of the first or second and
refused to take his quota of $800 of
the fourth loan. He took half of it
($400) and thought that was enough,
He announced that he "would not go
in debt to buy bonds." The committee
voted unanimously in favor of requir- I
ing Mr. Clarke to take the full quota
assessed against him. Several mem
bers of the council thought it much
too low.
Sigman Coleman, who acknowledg
ed that he owns 660 acres of land and
a town residence worth $3,500 and
has $1000 in the bank and owes no
debts, had taken none of the first,
second or third loans and only re
cently took $100 of the fourth loan,
His quota had been fixed at $400,
which he refused to take, but offered
to take another $100 worth of the
fourth loan. When the committee an
nounced that his quota had been raised
from $400 to $1500 Mr. Coleman, who
occupied the "witness stand" turned
a sickly greenish yellow color and
after gulping a few times almost
shouted: "My God, men I can't do
that. I just can't take that much,
In checking up Mr. Coleman's
wealth (He refused to give any in
formation as to the value of his land
and the committee had to approxi
mate the value which was finally
placed at $40 per acre, which was re
it decided
i
. GALLED TO ACCOUNT
as very was
that Mr. Coleman's assessment of
$1500 was too high and it was placed
at $800. He protested bitterly against
this assessment. Mr. Coleman claim
ed he has given $10 to the Red Cross,
Mr, Clarke took his full assessment
this morning, making $800 that he has
taken of the fourth loan and $250 of
the third. Today he is enthusiastic
ally helping the committee to "round
up" others who have not taken their
full quotas.
Ivan Williams, driver of a dray,
was called before the committee for
having made derogatory remarks
about the Red Cross. He was severely
reprimanded and told to be more care
ful in the future.
n
LIVESTOCK PRICES
SHOWING DECLINE
PORTLAND STOCK YARDS RE
PORT HEAVY BUSINESS WITH
LOWER PRICES
&> .
Portland Union 1 Stock Yards.—The
arrivals of .cattle and calves at the
North Portland Union Stock Yards
were 1300 head. There is a better
feeling in the cattle division today
trading is good and prices have an
upward tendency. Quotations: Prime
steers, $12.00-13.00; good to choice
steers, $11.00-12.00; medium to good
steers, $9.75-11.00; fair to medium
steers, $8.25-9.2&j common to fair
steers, $6.00-8.00; choice cows and
heifets, $8.00-9.00; Medium to good
cows and heifers, $6.00-7.25; fair to
medium cows and heifers,, $ö.00-6. 00;
canners, $3.00-4.00; bulls, $5.00-7.00;
calves, $9.00-12.00; stockers and feed
2900 sheep and lambs arrived over
Sunday. Trading in the sheep alleys
slow but prices are holding steady |
quoted: Prime lambs $12.00- I
13.60; fair to medium lambs, $9.00 |
11.00; yearlings, $10.00-11.00; weth-i
ers, $9.00-10.00; ewes, $6.50-9.00.
ers. $6.00-8.00.
With a liberal run of 2400 hogs
the market today the market shows a
decline of 15 to 26 cents. A large
number of stock hogs are coming and
the average weight of all the hogs
falls short of previous shipments.
Quotation« are: Prime mixed, $17.90
18.00; medium mixed, $17.50-17.75;
rough heavies, $16.90-17.00;
$15.00-16.00; bulk, $17.75-18.00.
on
Pigs,
DISTRICT JUDGE RESIGNS
TO ENTER S. A. T. C.
Judge Carl Davis of the Boise district
resigned the judgeship to become a
soldier. Mr. Davis arrived in Moscow !
yesterday expecting to take a month's
training here, but he is to be sent on to
camp at once. Mr. and Mrs* Davis
were students at the university' twenty
years ago. Mrs. Davis, formerly' Inez j
Herbert, is now in Washington, D, C,
the civil service. Mr. Davis is trying
a commission.
Latah county is still far below her
quota in the fourth Liberty loan. Up
to last night, with Troy and Bovill
not having reported for many days,
the sales within the county totalled
$668,500, of which Moscow had taken
$310,500. This leaves Moscow with
$89,600 to raise to meet her quota
and the county, outside of Moscow,
must raise $142,000 to meet its quota.
The çounty's quota is $800,000, of
which Moscow has half.
Jerome j Day> the mining magnate>
w hose home is in Moscow, took $30,
000 worth of bonds unconditionally
yesterday. Mr. Day had offered to
take $30,000 worth provided the
county came within $30,000 of its
quota.
Harry Whittier, cashier of the Mos
cow State Bank, to take $30,000
worth of the bonds, regardless of
what the county did.
With four more days in which to
raise, the county and city's quota the
committee redoubled its efforts today,
It is "going after" S. Coleman, who
was before the council of defense last
night but what action will be taken
i s not made public. H. H. Simpson,
county chairman, declares that the
city of Moscow "can, must and will
raise its quota" and expresses con
fidence that the city will "go over
the top" before Saturday night,
| s no t so sanguine about the county
outside of Moscow, but is working
bard to secure the amount asked of '*'
this county.
Yesterday he authorized
He
Following are the subscribers and,
the amounts they have taken since
the last list was published. This is
for Moscow, only. The list follows:
Clayton, Joseph E.
Gossett, Richard C.
McGuire, John E. (Add)
Bielenberg, B. H. (Add).
Olson, Henry .
Byers^ Ed.
Schumacker, J. W.
Edgett, Ruth M.
Gemmill, E. J.
Langdon, G. J. (Add)...
Suppiger, Eleanor B. ...
Eggan, S. Etta .
Reeder, Ross R.
Deesten, Chris. J.
Sletto, Ole ..
Wood, Mae .
Price, Mrs. Margaret ...
Nichols, Elmer D.
Odenborg, Oscar A.
$ 50
60
100
100
60
50
60*
50
250
160
20CK
50
260
300
400
60
100
1000
50
Gustafson, Alfred .
Clark, F. A. (Add).
Dowdy, E. M..
Knudson, Martin .
Bolding, James .1.
Dahlquist, E.
Albright, G. F .
Hoover, Amy B.
Pattison, Mae K.
Sten, L. &> Son .
Stallings, E.
Peasley, Dewey .
Mulalley, Michael .
Naylor, J. L. (Add) ....
Pitzen. Fred S.
Hill, W. H.
Goodwin, Thos.
Washburn, M. E.
Dygert, Phoebe .
Weber, Hulda (Add) ...
Martin, H. D.
McDowell, John R.
Hall, Margaret L.
Collins, 1. L.•.
Moerder, Roy R.
Yarbor, A.
Rogers, Thomas H.
Daniels, James .
Snow, Chester.
Christoffers, Chris.
Roberts, Lester N.
Proounier, D. L.
Estes, Willis A< ...
Quaîey, K. C.
Keith, H". M.
Fleiger, Charles .
100
150
150
100 "
200
200
... 100
50
100
200
100
60
100
500
250
50
50
300
50
100
400
200
100
150
100
200
300
100
300
100
60
Sir*
■50
Clarke, Mrs. J. N.
1 Adair, W. A. 400
Summeri'ield, Mrs. Charles....- 60
j Yates, J. W. (Add) ....
| Bowers, Chas. E. .....
j GritiriJin, Chas. L. .. 8000
! Semmes, Marie .
Trimble, Fay .
i Hughes, Harriet ......
j Walters, Bessie .
' Stelz, Mrs. Ida .
Stelz, Peter .
Stelz, Louis .
Smith, H. R. (Add) ...
Richard, Mrs. James H. 100
I Miller, Mr. and Mrs. H. T. 150
Kimberling, S. G .
McElroy, Corliss .
Doyle, Percy R.
Canham, John .
Childers, Lulu B...
Coverdale, Mr. and Mrs. A. N... 600
Coverdale, Mr. and Mrs. A. N.
(Additional) .
Davidson, Chas L.
Frazee, A. A. and Milton
Harper, Earl F .
Hofer, Philip A.
Johnson, Roy O.
Lee, Andrew .
Lee, Rasmuss O.
Leu, G. H.
Litch, Glenn A.
MacCaughey, Chas, (Add) .... 200
McCoy, Chas.
Miller, F. G. (Add)
Nisbit, Maggie J. .
Peterson, Conrad ..
Swanson, Ole .
50"
60
50
50
60
-Vii*
60
60
60
200
60
SO
50
60
300
300
100
100
50
500
160
50
50
60
100
60
60
50
60
50
150
60
60
100
Mrs. E. T. Driskill and daughter,
Bertram, who have been visiting with
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Clark,
left this morning for Seattle to join Mr.
Driskill. who is engaged in war work
on the coast.

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