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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 18, 1918, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1918
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO
VOLUME VIII
NUMBER 18
ALLIES ARE DRIVING HUNS FROM BELGIUM
Driven, like hunted foxes, the German forces are rushing out of Belgium
and northern France, closely pursued by the allies who are taking thousands
of prisoners and much ammunition, many guns and large supplies of stores.
The Germans are preparing to flood eastern Belgium in hopes of cutting off
their pursuers and gaining time in which to escape back to Germany.
Austria announces that a change in government is to be made on a fed
eralized basis and it is believed that both Austria and Germany are preparing
their internal affairs to accept the terms of the allies.
German socialists gathered in Under den Linden, Berlin's great thorough
fare, and sang the French national anthem and tried to attack the palace of
the kaiser. German soldiers are said to be revolting and posting placards
denouncing the kaiser, the crown prince, Ludendorff and Hindenberg.
Everywhere the allied forces are making steady gains. Lille, the largest
city the Germans had taken in their four years of war, has been retaken by
the allies who also have Ostend, Zeebrugge and Bruges.
Many towns and cities that have been held by the Germans since the
autumn of 1914 are again in possession of the allies and the Belgians will
soon have their country back, entirely divested of Germans, who are said
to be preparing to evacuate Brussels, the Belgian capital and it is predicted
will be out of that city in 10 days.
Following are the telegraphic and cable dispatches received today:
British Took Four Thousand Prisoners Yesterday.
LONDON.—-(Official.)—Over 4,000, German prisoners were taken by the
British yesterday in their offensive in the Bohain-Le-Cateau region.
Between Sensee canal and Lys river the British are. continuing their ad
vance along The whole front.
North of Cambrai the British captured a number of Villages and crossed
the Duoai-Kenain road. Advancing northeast of Lille the British have
reached a point one mile from Turciong.
- Allies Take Zeebrugge and Bruges.
LONDON.— Zeebrugge, the port of Bruges, the second most important
German submarine base on the Belgian coast has been occupied by the allied
forces.
Bruges, seven miles south of Zeebruge has been evacuated by the Germans,
according to Belgian army headquarters information.
British Have Taken Turcoing.
LONDON.—Turcoing, six miles north of Lille, has been entered by the
British forces, according to the London Evening News.
y
Belgians Enter Bruges.
BRITISH HEADQUARTERS IN FLANDERS.—Belgian infantry have en
tered Bruges, which was evacuated by the Germans who have held it since
1914.
Report German Army Has Begun Revolt.
ZURICH.—Official statements issued by Entente war offices are no longer
published in Germany.
Rumors reaching here are to the effect that there has been outbreaks
among the German soldiers at the front.
Abusive placards concerning the emperor, crown prince, Von Hindenberg
and Ludendorff have been posted in various railroad stations in Germany.
Camp Lewis is Quarantined.
CAMP LEWIS, Wash.—This camp will be placed under strict quarantine
tomorrow as a preventative measure against influenza which is now epidemic
in the northwest.
Germans Sing "Marseilles" in Berlin.
AMSTERDAM.—(By Associated Press.)—The Cologne Volks Zeitung re
ports demonstrations by German independent socialists in Unter den Linden,
Berlin.
The crowd sang "The Marseilles," the French national hymn. Police pre
vented the demonstrators from reaching the imperial palace. There was a
clash between police and demonstrators in which some of the crowd were
injured.
Austria Plans Federalization.
VIENNA.—Steps for the reorganization of Austria on a federalized basis
have been proclaimed by Emperor Charles.
The plan does not include the union of Austrian Poland with the inde
pendent Polish state, the emperor declared.
The city of Trieste and Trieste regions are to be treated separately "in
conformity with the wish of the population."
Germans Prepare to Flood Belgium.
LONDON.—Amsterdam reports that the Germans are" preparing to inun
date the low lying lands south of the river Scheldt in eastern Belgium.
The inhabitants have been ordered to abandon their homes.
Germans Again Burning Villages.
A AMSTERDAM.-—Huge fires seen in the Bruges region. The flames are
spreading says a "flash" report from that section.
Serbian Forces Still Advancing.
LONDON.—(Serbian Official.)—Allied troops successfully advanced north
ward from Nish. The Serbs captured Kruchevats, 30 miles northwest of Nish.
Germany Announces Further Retirements.
BERLIN.—(Official.)-—Enemy attacks on German lines yesterday between
Le Gateau and Aisonville resulted in penetrating lines in isolated points.
Germans in New Retirement.
PARIS.—(Official.)—The Germans began a new retirement movement in
the area between the Oise and Serre rivers between Laon and Cambrai. The
French are advancing from Aichry and Choigny iu pursuit of the German
rear guards.
Belief That Loan Will be Oversubscribed.
WASHINGTON.—The Fourth Liberty loan neared the home stretch of the
campaign with $4,250,000,090 subscribed.
Despite tremendous undersubscribed balance the campaigners reported they
will be satisfied with nothing less than an oversubscription.
Casualty List is Much Lighter.
There are only 350 names in the casualty lists issued today,
issued for morning papers follows:
Killed in action, 31; missing in action, 14; wounded severely, 65; died
from wounds, 6; died of disease, 7; wounded, degree undetermined, 52;
total, 175.
Afternoon List.—Killed in action, 22; missing in action, 20; wounded se
verely, 65; died of accident and other causes, 2; died of wounds, 6; died of
The list
j
HOUR OCTOBER 27 j
_ I
WASHINGTON.—No further ef
SET CLOCKS BACK AN
fort will be made by congress to con
tinue the existing daylight saving law
and the hands of the clocks will be
turned back an hour on October 27,
as originally planned. This decision
was reached today at a conference be
tween congressional leaders and
Chairman Baruch of the war indus
tries board, who had requested that
that law remain in force for the period
of the war.
The senate recently passed a bill to
continue the law in effect indefinitely,
)
and it now is pending in the house.
The war industries board urged con
tinuation of the law, particularly be
cause of its value in the saving of
fuel.
_(E|__
Coffee Futures Taboo.
NEW YORK.—All trading in coffee
futures has been suspended by the
New York coffee and sugar exchange,
pending the result of negotiations
with the federal food administration.
To Have Gas Sundays.
WASHINGTON. — National Fuel
Administrator Garfield today lifted
the ban on gasolineless Sundays. 1
)
'
•|* «£• oj* •?» »Jo *£* pt* A «S« <£• *?» *?->
* QUESTIONNAIRES FOR *
*. . OLDER MEN TO GO OUT ❖
V
*
WASHINGTON — Question- *
❖ naires for men 37 to 46 years ❖
❖ old and those in the 18 year ❖
❖ classes under the draft laws ❖
❖ were ordered released by Pro- ❖
*> vost Marshal General Crowder ❖
❖ today in all local board districts ❖
❖ where classification of other ❖
❖ groups is completed.
+ boards sending out these ques- ❖
❖ tionnaires must release 10 per ❖
❖ cent daily.

Local ❖

ÜQ.
HELP RAILROADS
NORTHERN PACIFIC SUPERIN
TENDENT ASKS COOPERATION
TO SAVE TROUBLE
The following letter received today by
the Moscow Publishing company is glad
ly published in hopes that it may be
heeded and result in more care being
taken to avoid accidents that might
cause the loss of life. The letter fol
lows :
"Publisher Star-Mirror and Idaho Post,
"Moscow, Idaho.
"Dear Sir:
"The Northern Pacific railroad have
experienced considerable trouble by rea
son of farmers along our right of way
being careless in leaving private gates
open in our fences, thereby permitting
live stock to. have free access to our 1
right of way. I think that a great deal
of good in this respect can be accom
plished if you will be agreeable to pub
lishing the following article in your
paper as an appeal from the railroad
company ;
"There are many ways of aiding the
government in this war that are over
great
good. Farmers living along the lines of
railroads can be of great help to the
administration in its efforts to serve the
public well by seeing to it that crossing
gates are kept closed and by reporting
to the station agent or section foremen
any defects that they might find in the
fence enclosing the right of way. Gates
are often left open by careless hired
help or children. Fences might be
broken and stork get upon the right of
way and sometimes be struck by loco
motives. Stock is killed in this manner
and nossiblv the property of the railroad
administration greatly damaged, and
sometimes even human lives are sacri
ficed, all of which might have been
avoided if the farmers took a little
closer interest in the affairs of the gov
ernment having to do with the admin
istration of the railroad property. Let
act together in this matter and great
good may be accomplished.
"Yours truly.
BS
Isn't that a record to be
Yet there are some, who
are
Mrs. R. R. Rotzler and daughters,
Ruth and Rozella left for Seattle on
the afterrloon tra)in. Mr. Rotzler, j
who was formerly with the harvester
in this city, is not located in Seattle,
"J. D. FORCE,
"Superintendent.
Genesee Far Over Top.
Genesee is going strong on the
Fourth Liberty loan and has oversub
scribed, the quota of $82,100 by nearly
$40,000, the total subscriptions now
having reached the grand total of
$122,050.
proud of?
are still holding back and a few who
have failed to take their^ull quota,
although amply able to do so, who can
have no just pride in the fact that
this community is strongly backing
our boys on the fighting front with
their dollars. Can dollars be counted
against the supreme sacrifice they
making?—Getiesee News.
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• Caïd W. Davis, district manager
and organizer of the Nonpartizan
league, with headquarters recently
opened at Lewiston, is under arrest
on a charge of violating the espionage
law in Latah county. The warrant
for his arrest was issued by H. . R.
Smith, United States commissioner,
at Moscow, upon a complaint sworn to
by L. F. Parsons, chairman of the
Latah county council of defense. The
arrest was made by a deputy United
States marshal.
The complaint charges that Davis
made these statements: ^'Capitalists
and big business concerns of America
met in Berlin and framed this war.
You don't have to buy Liberty bonds.
These bonds are nothing but graft.
Let those who framed the war buy
them. The government is standing
in with the banks and you only get
four per cent for your money. The
banks charge 8 or 10 per cent for the
same money.
"The Red Cross is all right but
you don't know if the money goes
to the right place."
R. W. Bignell, another Nonpartizan
organizer, is also under arrest upon
a warrant issued by Commissioner
Smith on complaint of Chairman Par
sons, of the county council of defense,
who charges that Bignell said in La
tah county:
"There are 14 men connected with
the state food administration of
Washington and 11 of them have been
hoarding food."
Of the Liberty bond drive he is
alleged in the comp
"The Liberty bond
n
banks."
laint to have said:
matter is nothing
but a profiteering of big business con
cerns and of the banks and they are
the ones that make the final rake
off."
"Most of thé councils of defense
in the state of Washington are backed
by big business concerns and the
Mr. Parsons said: "For some time
the council of defense and the depart
ment of justice have been at work
qq these eases. We secured satisfac
tory evidence that these men had
made these statements and that they
were injuring the work of putting the
bond drive over. After due consulta
tion with the
department
the council of defense it was decided
to make the arrests. The men will
be given a hearing before the United
States commissioner. There is no
politics in this matter. It is a case
of stopping disloyalty an dopposition
to the government's conduct of the
war."
GERMANY RECALLS
REPORTS THAT GERMANY IS
PREPARING FOR PEACE PUB
LISHED OFFICIALLY
AMSTERDAM.—(By the Associ
ated Press.)—According to the Cour
ant, the German newspapers this
evening were to publish the follow
ing communication:
"The German army command has
brought military measures into accord
with the steps taken for the conclu
sion of peace. The German armies
have received orders to cease all dev
astation of places, unless they are ab
soiutely forced to follow this course
by the military situation for defensive
reasons.
"Nevertheless, it is to be expected
that in the gradual retreat property
will be lost which is irreplacable by
money, that is to say, insofar as such
devastation is inherent in the conduct
of the war itself, and especially on
the bombardment of German positions
by enemy artillery."
The Handelsblad publishes with re
serve a report that the German ad
miralty has issued wireless instruc
tions to all submarines to return to
their bases.
LATAH COUNTY STILL LACKS
Tomorrow is Pershing Day. ❖
H. H. Simpson, county chair- ❖
❖ man of the Liberty loan drive ❖
❖ is in receipt of the following 4*
❖ telegram:
❖ "Boise, Idaho, 2:20 p. m., Oct.
❖ 18.— H. H. Simpson, Chairman, ❖
❖ Moscow, Idaho: Saturday, Oc- *
❖ tober nineteenth is General ❖
❖ Pershing's Day. State commit- ❖
❖ tee urges every citizen in Idaho ❖
❖ to subscribe one more bond in ❖
❖ honor thereof. Please publish. ❖
"GWINN, Chairman." ❖
❖ ❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖❖•J«
:•


I s
ELDON G. PHELPS
DIED EARLY TODAY
MOSCOW YOUNG MAN EXPIRED
IN NAVAL HOSPITAL AT
PUGET SOUND YARD
Eldon Phelps, of Moscow, died this
morning at the naval hospital at the
Puget Sound navy yard, of influenza.
Mrs. Pearl Phelps, his wife, received
a telegram yesterday from Dr. C. C.
Grieve, commanding officer, stating
that her husband was seriously sick.
Today she received another telegram
announcing that he had died at 4:42
this morning.
Mr. Phelps enlisted in the naval
reserve on June 28 and was called on
October 2 and left here on that date.
He was well and favorably known
here. He is a son of C. H. Phelps, of
Moscow and leaves a widow and young
child. He had been employed as
driver of the truck for Williamson's
department store.
Eldon left Moscow October 2 with
the contingent of boys to join the
navy. He was born in Illinois, but
had lived in Idaho since he was nine
years of age, and at the time of his
death was 24 years of age. He was
married in September, 1917, to Miss
Pearl Buchanan, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. James Buchanan, of this city.
Besides his wife, he leaves a young
son, nine weeks of age. The body
will be brought to Moscow Saturday
and the funeral will probably
Sunday.
occur
P
V. R, SCOFIELD
UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO GRADU
ATE IN AVIATION WORK ON
BATTLE FRONT
A Montana paper of recent date
has been received containing an ex
tract of a letter written his parents
by Lieut. William R. Schofield in
command of an aero squadron (341st)
in France.
Lieutenant Schofield graduated
from the University of Idaho with the
class of 1916 and his many friends
here will be glad to hear of him. The
Montana paper says:
"Lieut. W. R. Schofield writes his
parents under recent dates that the
aero squadron (341st) of which he is
commanding officer, is awaiting with
what patience they can command, a
call to the front.
"He mentioned Quentin Roosevelt,
saying it was sad to think he was
killed so early in the game. Said he
was personally acquainted with him
and how much all his brother flyers
thought of him.
In speaking of his own accident,
Schofield said: 'You know that part of
our course in flying is acrobatics. One
of the requirements is to do a vrille
(vree) which in the States is c/.lled
a tail spin. We have to get up about
1200 meters (4,000 feet) before we
start and come out of it at about 500
meters. The stick was not quite in a
neutral adjustment in the machine I
had and I forgot this when I started to
come out of the vrille I was in. So in
placing my stick in what appeared to
be the neutral I placed it a little to
one side, which threw me into another
vrille in the opposite direction. I was
too late in correction so I vrilled clear
into the ground. As to dislocating my
vertebrae, 1 think someone must have
been filling me, for I would suppose
that such would cause paralysis some
where. At any rate I do know I was
dead to the world for a few hours. I
certainly think God must have been
riding with me that time. I don't
think I ever climbed into a machine
but that I offered up a little prayer
that God would ride with me that I
might finish my work and get to the
front to do some good. Even now I
expect to do that. The work I am go
ing to do will require frequent flights"
over the lines, but probably not for
'chasse' work.' "
Mrs. J. J, Headrick of Linville was
called to Spokane today by illness of
her son, Ralph, of pneumonia. Mack
Neely went by automobile with Mrs.
Headrick at 10:30 this morning.
With reports up to Friday night from
i practically every precinct in Latah coun
b v > the county stilly kicked $100,000 of
having its quota of $800.000 of the fourth
Liberty loan raised. This amount must
I he raised before tomorrow night. In
❖[order to help those who postpone until
j the "eleventh hour" the work they should
'lo in the first hour, the
cow will be open from 7 to 9 o'clock to
enable them to take their quotas.
1 "'rite name of every man, no matter
how r jch or influential, who fails to
take his quota will he published iu the
newspapers as a bond slacker" is the
announcement made by the committee.
The subscriptions will be checked up
Sunday and on Monday the name of
every slacker will he published to the
world. The committee will play no
favorites. The rich man wall be posted
if he fails to do his duty, no matter how
much political or other influence he may
have.
J. A. Harsh, the Deary banker and
all-round bustier, spent last night in
Moscow in consultation with the com
mittee and went back to Deary this
morning announcing that that part of
Latah county will be oversubscribed by
Saturday night.
Moscow lacks about $40,000 of having
her quota raised. The full quota will
be subscribed before the banks close at
9 o'clock tomorrow night. That state
ment has been made by men who know
whereof they speak and they are going
to work Saturday to put the town and
county "over .the top,"
Subscriptions not previously reported
in Moscow follow :
Earl Summers .
W. N. Elliott (additional).
Dan E. Daniels .
E. L. Clark .
G. F. Albright i additional)
T. B. McBfyde.
fames • Clark .
Marshall Clark .
C. E.
L. A. Phillips .
William J. Hunter .
1. C. Stillingcr .
John L. Naylor (additional).
LaFayette Keene ..
Joe Driscoll ...
James M, Buchanan .
Michael Ford (additional) .
Victor Anderson .
J. C. Williams .
banks of Mos
$ 50
50
200
50
SO
100
200
SO
olles (additional)
300
200
50
21 * I
2,000
300
200
100
150
SO
100
J. E. Lyon- ,. . . . . ..
Momer A. Kissinger.
Chas. Edwin (additional) .
Thomas Hqlpin (additional) ....
John E. Hall (additional).
J. B. Kissinger ..
B. E. Rugg .
Hulda M. Hendrickson .
Milton Rogers.
Frank Mattson .
A. M. Rogers .
Mrs. F. L. Allen.#.
Nelson Hayward ..
J. B. Gilchrist (additional) .
J. C. Penny Co. (additional).
A. F. Daniels .
Tav Woodworth (additional) ....
Clinton Wilson .
C. S. F'inley .
Ada Bower .
C. F. Thompson (additional).
Herbert Scmmes .
Carl Smith .
Anna L. Anderson .
John A. Kite .
Chas. Crowe (additional) .
Albert Dygert .
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Nessly (add'l).
Henry Hofmann .
A. L. Morgan .
Gladys N, Albert .
Mabel C. Bigelow .
Mrs. T. R. Bovd.
Harriet Ely Byrns .
Boyd R. Childers .
P. H. Clayton .
Sarah L. Cornwall .
A. P. Dahl .
Pat Doyle .
R. H. Eves....
Ed. Hagedorn (additional) .
Edward Hagedorn, Jr.
Wm. Hunter (additional) ...
Win. Lennox .
H. B. Mickey (additional).. .
Geo. H. Moody (additional)
O, E. Morton .
Elmer M. Paulson.
Al. Prcsby .
John Shannon .
Mrs, C. L. Schumaker.
C. H. Van Meter...
J. G. Vennigcrholz (additional) ...
R, B. Ward .
Mrs. R. B. Ward.
S. C. Williams (additional). 200
so
50
100
1,500
200
200
50
100
50
so
50
50
100
100
300
100
3(X)
100
50
so
100
so
100
50
50
100
1,500
too
.91
100
50
50
50
4,000
100
300
1,000
250
600
100
200
100
500
• 150
100
400
200
1 , 00(1
50
100
50
150
100
100
100
r
SENATE CHANGES INCOME
TAX TO HELP CORPORATIONS
WASHINGTON.—The senate fi
nance committee revising the war rev
enue bill amended the house provi
sion by fixing a flat tax of 12 per
cent upon the net income of corpora
tions, thus eliminating the section
imposing a 6 per cent additional tax
upon undistributed earnings. Chair
man Simmons estimated the change
reduces the tax appropriation $140,
000 , 000 .
p ■
Ralph Brownlow is "Across."
An error in yesterday's paper made
the report of the arrival "overseas"
of Ralph Brownlow read "Brownless."
The name should have been Ralph H.
Browflow, who is well known in Mos
cow, having been linotype operator
for the Idaho Post for several years.
Mr. Brownlow was one of the first
contingent of 100 men to enter the
vocational training school at the Uni
versity of Idaho. His wife and little
daughter are in Spokane.

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