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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 18, 1918, Image 5

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-10-18/ed-1/seq-5/

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T^ T ^T ^T T^y ~^~ f^T f^> Y^T T^P T^Pt^T ▼^P T^T Y^YY^Y
ABOUT ONE HUNDRED PAIRS SHOES
English last, black and tan—mostly black—worth
in any Moscow store $9.00 to $10.00. We are offer
ing this lot at a CLOSING OUT PRICE for
WOOLEN UNDERWEAR, WOOLEN SHIRTS,
STAG SHIRTS, MACKINAWS — ALL AT
CLOSING OUT PRICES.
$ 5.35
Buy now when you can buy for LESS.
— :
The Togs Clothes Shop
Opposite Hotel Moscow.
CitfXetfç
Miss Mary Kinnear who has been
viriting her sister, Mrs. J. J. Keane,
left yesterday for Spokane.
Mrs. Homer Kissinger and mother,
of Viola, were trading in Moscow
Thursday.
Miss Grace Patterson left last ev
ening for Colfax to spend the week
end with her sister, Mrs. Osterhout.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Bowers and Mr.
and Mrs. C. J. Bowers of Walla Walla
are visiting Mrs. L. W. Reid of route
four.
Mrs. Hasfuther and daughter of
■Genesee were in the city yesterday.
Mrs. John Bishop and daughter, of
Pullman, were in Moscow yesterday.
Miss May Ankcorn, a teacher of
Pine City, is a guest of Mrs. Howard
Schriver.
Lieut. J. E. McNeil, who is military
inspector for the northwest district,
is at the university today.
We are in the market for potatoes.
AH growers please list with us appro
ximate number of sacks and kind you
will have for sale. Washburn & Wilson.
Phones 36, 1S0Y, 19J.
, Gertrude Stephenson, assistant reg
istrar at the university, left this af
ternoon on a business trip to Spo
kane.
Nine hundred and ninety-two stu
dents are registered at the university
at present and more are registering
each day.
Mrs. H. B. Reed hnd Mrs. R. H.
Simonson each contributed fruit for
the soldiers' mess fund recently.
Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Quesenberry of
Troy are in the city.
Mr. and Mrs. Argo Bateman from
east of Moscow are in trading today.
Miss Helen Hadden has gone to her
home east of Moscow for the week-end.
She is attending the Ursuline convent.
Notice.—On and after October 15,
1918, all work done by me will be strictly
•cash. Emer J. Davis, paperhanger. 14-25
Cleveland Sharp arrived today from
Filmus college, Oregon, called by the
■death of his brother, Orville Sh^rp.
Percy Patton came in today from
Hokum, Wash.
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Taylor and Miss
Nellie Landry, of Johnson, are in shop
ping today.
Mr. and Mrs. S. I. West and Miss
Clara Miller of Palouse are in the city.
206tf
j
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bruegeman of
■Cottonwood have been visiting the past
week with their brother, Frank Bruege
man, of Thorn Creek.
,Chas. A. Davis left this morning for
'rfis home at Burbank, Wash.
Jesse Oylear of Linville is very low
■of typhoid fever.
The Historical club has discontinued
all meetings until after the ban is raised
on public gatherings.
Harry Hickman came in yesterday
from Colfax to visit a few days with
his father, W. F. Hickman.
Mrs. A. K. Yearout and family have
gone to Centralia, Wash., to join Mr.
Yearout, where they expect to make
their home.
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Harsh of Deary
.are registered at the Hotel Moscow.
Don Aiken and Mr. and Mrs. Virgil
Aiken left for Spokane today.
Mrs. Carl Rogers, whose husband
is in France, went to Spokane today
for a short Visit.
Dr. and Mrs. R. T. Witty of Bovill
are in the city.
Mrs. J. Cherpillod of Sunshine was
in shopping today.
Mrs. D. W. Hannah is reported to
day as still improving.
Weather
with heavy frosts,
southeast. Saturday fair and warmer.
Mrs. Jessie Warren was called to
Farmington Thursday morning by the
serious illness of her mother.
Idaho — Tonight fair,
Cooler in the
We are in the market for Peas
Beans
Potatoes
Apples
Pears
and
Onions
Washburn & Wilson Produce Co.
11-tf
Call 36, 19J, 160 Y
Republicans of North Organize.
Last Monday at Moscow, republicans
of the 10 northern counties of Idaho
organized a district and made arrange
ments to carry on an active campaign for
the election of the state, congressional
and legislative tickets of the republican
Moscow is to be made head-1
party.
quarters and Arnold S. Lyon, of Mos- f
cow, was selected as chairman. R. F. '
Kercival, of Coeur d'Alene was made
secretary.
The organization is formed for the
ourpose of combatting the nonpartisan
league. Senator Nugent, who has been
indorsed by the nonpartisan league, is to
be opposed as is Samuels, who was nom
inated by the league for governor.—
Lewis County Register.
NEZPERGE STRICKEN
WITH INFLUENZA
LEWISTON ASKED TO HELP
TOWN WHERE DISEASE HAS
BEEN FATAL TO FOUR
• LEWISTON.—Dr. E. L. White of
the White hospital, Lewiston, who
has been assisting in handling the
influenza epidemic in Nez Perce,
made an urgent appeal today that 26
or more Lewiston people go to Nez
Perce today to act as nurses there
and that as many physicians as pos
sible also go. Dr. White states "there
is not a family in Nez Perce where
there is not one to two cases, and in
some instances entire families are
stricken. The situation is not con
fined to the town. There are cases
in the country where whole families
are ill and no one to attend them"
It was stated that Dr. Gist, Dr.
Taylor and Dr. Dunlap have been try
ing to meet the situation, but that
Dr. Gist is ill and the remaining two
physicians are worked to the point
of exhaustion. Dr. White urged quick
action on the part of Lewiston people
today, asking that those who can
make the trip by automobile reach
Nez Perce at the earlist possible
moment.
Mayor Osmers and P. R. Bevis,
president of the Lewiston Commercial
club, in cooperation with Dr. Susan
Bruce, city health officer, and Dr.
Alley, county physician, are making
arrangements for relief work. The
Lewiston Red Cross chapter urges
that all women who have taken home
nursing courses report.
Four Deaths Reported.
County Auditor J. B. White died
yesterday evening about 6 o'clock.
Clarence Brown, son of the Nez
perce butcher, died about 8 p. m. yes
terday.
Henry Berry, aged about died at
4 o'clock this morning.
Fred Hillenbrand, the Nezperce
drayman, died at 5 o'clock this morn
ing.
n
TELEPHONE RAISE
TO RE PROTESTED
MOSCOW CITIZENS WILL OBJECT
TO LOCAL COMPANY INCREAS
ING ITS RATES
The hearing on the application of
the Moscow Telephone company for
the privilege of increasing its rates,
which was to have been held here
on October 22, has been indefinitely
postponed because of the influenza
order which forbids the holding of
any public meetings. George G.
Pickett, city attorney, received notice
from the public utilities commission
of Idaho, by telegraph today, that
the hearing has been "indefinitely
postponed."
Moscow citizens have registered a
vigorous protest against raising tele
phone rates here. The rates are re
garded as high now, and the propo
sition to increase them has aroused
much feeling here. A petition pro
testing against any advance in rates
and stating that the company pro
poses to increase rates in town and
double the rates on rural lines, and
pledging the signers to assist finan
cially in fighting: the proposed ad
vance, is being circulated and liber
ally signed.
The telephone system here was
owned by T. A. Meeker, who sold it
last spring to A. T. West, of Dav
enport, who asked, soon after buying
the system, for permission to increase
the rates. Moscow citizens and pat
rons of the rural lines are preparing
to put up a vigorous fight against the
proposed increase in rates and are
preparing complaints against the
service which will be presented to
the utilities commission when it meets
here for the hearing of the applica
It is claimed, by those who have
been investigating the matter, that,
under the present rates, the system
pays big dividends and evidence of
this is being secured by Moscow citi
zens to present to the commission.
The hearing is expected to be an in
teresting one.
tion.
GET WRITING GRAZE
Yankee Fighters Heap Troubles
on the Censor.
When Out of the Trenches He "Tells
'Em About It" in Reams
and Reams.
Paris.—The letter-writing craze has
struck the American army.
Just as soon as he gets out of the
trenches the doüghboy washes up,
scurries around for pen and paper and
sits down to tell 'em all about It. And
he tells 'em In reams and reams.
"Well, let's see," he says, as he
meditatively kicks his steel helmet
under bis cot 'Tve got to write to ma
and pa, Kittle and Johnny Boggs over
at Canton, O. Then, I owe Nell John
son a letter. And I've got to stwlbble
a few lines to Uncle Abe and Aunt
Minnie. After that I'll answer those
letters of Bill and Tom."
Writing materials—paper and en
velopes—are not always plentiful
where the doughboy Is stationed, and
for a while It was doubtful whether
the last of his correspondence list
would receive their letters, for the
supply In the small town stores was
soon exhausted. But the Y. M. C. A.,
learning of this scarcity, soon ar
ranged to supply all contingents. It
sent out seven million sheets of writ
ing paper and some 3,500,000 envelopes
a month.
With the tremendous growth of the
expeditionary force, orders have been
Increased and the estimate for next
year is 120,000,000 sheets of paper and
60,000,000 envelopes.
This means that the Yanks will use
about 720 tons of writing materials—
720 tons of news and comfort for the
folks at home.
And when the censor officers stop to
consider It they grow weak, for it Is
their duty, along with everything else,
to censor the letters and see to It that
the soldier uses discretion and doesn't
mention things of military Importance,
CUT OUT FRAIS DURING WAR
Fraternity Houses and Clubs at Syra
cuse to Be Used as
Barracks.
Syracuse, N. Y.—Fraternal life at
Syracuse university will cease for the
duration of the war. Frathonses and
clubhouses will be converted Into bar
racks for tne members of the students' i
army training corps. It is expected the j
students will be too busily engaged in !
their studies to give attention to "rush-1
mg," "pledging" and "initiation."
Read today's news in today's Star
Mirror.



+
CONTRIBUTION BOX


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ,*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
Senate Joint Resolution No. 2 provides
for calling a constitutional convention.
Senate Joint Resolution No. 4 pro
vides for amending section 4, article 12,
of the Constitution of Idaho to permit
counties and municipalities to become
stockholders in. and give financial aid to
fair associations, not organized for profit.
Senate Joint Resolution No. 5 pro
vides that section 1, article 4, of the
Constitution of Idaho be amended to,
the end that the office of state superin
tendent be abolished.
Senate Join Resolution No. 10 pro
vides for the amendment of section 1,
article 8, of the Constitution of Idaho
be the end that the state indebtedness
may be increased.
House Joint Resolution No, .. pro
vides that section 4, of article 2, of the
Constitution of Idaho to permit a change
in the manner of electing officers for
incorporated companies.
for
The
constitutional
amending that instrument are as follows :
"It shall be the duty of the legislature
to submit such amendment or amend
ments to the electors of the state at the
next general election, and cause the same
to be published without delay for at least
six consecutive weeks, prior to said elec
tion in not less than one newspaper of
general circulation, published in each
county;"
provisions
The legislature which adopted the
foregoing joint resolutions provided "The
secretary of state is hereby authorized
to make publication of the proposed
amendments in each county once a week
for six consecutive weeks prior to the
general election, in a newspaper of gen
eral circulation published in each
county."
The general election at which the pro
posed amendments are to be submitted
to the electors of Latah county will occur
November 5th, a little more than two
weeks hence; yet how many of our elec
tors know that certain amendments to
the State Constitution, one of which
means higher taxes, are to be proposed
at that election?
Why do so few persons know about
the proposed amendments? Simply be
cause the secretary of state is not giv
ing heed to either the law, or the Con
stitution, both of which provide that the
amendments shall be published once a
week for six consecutive weeks prior to
the general election in a newspaper of
general circulation published in each,
county.
A few of the electors in Latah county,
not many, have learned that certain
amendments to the State Constitution
are being published in the Troy News,
and perhaps in the Kendrick Gazette,
both of which papers have but little other
than local circulation, and the publishers
are too conscientious to claim that their
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED
PHONE 248
L. M. KITLEY
Monuments
THE MOSCOW 'MÂRBI.E
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
\
Be Loyal
to the men who are giving their
lives to their country and yours.
This struggle is your struggle and
our struggle as much as their
struggle. Show them that you are
with them—
BUY A LIBERTY BOND TODAY
FIRST TRDST
& SAVINGS BANK
Always at Your Service.
papers have general circulation in Latah
county.
A TAX PAYER.
LATAH COUNTY RECORDS
Oct. 17.— C. M.—Herman Kalinow
ski to First National Bank, Moscow,
$7000; fixtures in building on Lot 8-4
West Plot Add. Moscow.
C. M.— W. J. Poole to J. W. Simp
son, $800; 4 mares, cow, 6 calves, ma
chinery, automobile.
Consent to Rt. Wy.—George R.
Ebel; road through Block
View Add. Genesee.
2 of City
We hear a great deal now days about Economy,
Saving this, Saving that and Save the other thing,
WELL AND GOOD, but how many of us
etc.
have ever gotten right down to brass tacks and
figured out what True Economy Means?
Is it buying cheaper merchandise which lasts no
time at all and must be replaced almost immedi
ately, or is it purchasing better merchandise that
will give long service and look well while giving
that service?
We will not answer it.
It is for you to decide.
Come to us with the perfect confidence and cer
tainty that every piece of merchandise offered by
us is exactly as represented. This is the result of
policy, rigidly adhered to—to make every
Customer a Satisfied Customer.
Try for yourself and see that it pays to trade at
our
Oberg Bros. Co.
Phone 97
Phone 73
Moscow, Idaho
?wvvvv'm f vv
PUBLIC SALE!
Having leased the bam to the Government I will offer at Public Sale
at the Old Commercial Bara on North Main Street in Moscow, on
Saturday, October 19, 1918
Commencing at 1 p. m., sharp, the following property, to-wit:
1 3-inch Wagon.
7 Sets Light Buggy Harness.
3 Single Harness.
1 Light Work Harness.
1 Writing Desk.
1 Small Safe.
2 Good Saddles.
6 1st Class Sleighs.
1 Landon Litter Carrier.
Tools, chains and other things
too numerous to mention.
There will also be offered at this
sale considerable good house
hold goods, some of it prac
tically new.
LIVE STOCK
6 Head of horses, as follows:
1 Sorrel Horse, weight 1300.
1 Sorrel Horse, weight 1050.
1 Bay Horse, weight 1250.
1 Bay Horse, weight 1100.
1 Bay Horse, weight 900.
1 Bay Horse, weight 900.
MACHINERY, ETC.
3 Good Top Buggies.
3 Good Open Buggies.
1 Hack.
1 Carriage.
1 Cab and about 12 Good Robes.
TERMS OF SALE—All sums of $20.00 and under, CASH, over that
amount time will be given until October 1st, 1919 on approved
Bankable notes bearing 10 per cent interest.
Owner
GEORGE STEWART
CHAS. E. WALKS, Auctioneer
- J. G. VENJflGERHOLZ, Clerk
Consent to Rt. Wy.—Above through
SE1-4 SE1-4 10-37-5 W.
W. D.—Frank Terhaar to Carl
Erickson, $500; Lot 10 and W 1-2
Lot 11-14 West Add. Genesee.
Rel.—Potlatch State Bank, to Ed
ward Vogel, R-m 3-8-18.
Rel.—Potlatch State Bank to C. C.
Conklin, R-m 3-26-14.
Rel.—Same to George G. Strong,
R-m 9-5-11.
A. M.—John A. Hove to Federal
Land Bank, $800; Sl-2 NE1-4 19-40-2
W.

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