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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 21, 1918, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
* VOLUME vm
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1918
NUMBER 20
GERMANY OEPERS MORE PEACE PROPOSALS
While Germany is offering new peace proposals that are certain to be
rejected, the allied armies are driving the Huns from France and Belgium
and General Ludendorff, who announced that the Germans would be in pos
session of Paris and the English channel by June 1, has told the kaiser and
the sovereigns of all German states that Germany will be invaded inside of
two weeks. For once his military predictions will probably be realized.
Yesterday 15,000 German soldiers were driven by the Belgians and British
across the line into Holland where they surrendered to Holland and will be
interned until the close of the war. Today advances are being made along
all fronts. The Germans are concentrating their resistance against the Am
erican advance and at one point forced the Americans to withdraw slightly
today, but the Americans rallied, counter charged and retook the ground lost.
Germany's reply to President Wilson's note setting forth the terms Ger
many must meet before an armistice will be considered, reached Washington
by wireless today, but the official text has not been received. Germany is
evi^Vtly sparring for time and asks the president to arrange plans for the
evacuation by German forces of foreign territory. Generals Foch, Pershing,
Haig and other commanders seem to have a splendid working plan for the
l ? evacuation which will probably be continued.
• The news by telegraph and cable received today follows:
Paris Says Germany Surrenders.
PARIS.—The German reply to President Wilson will announce the immedi
ate suspension of submarine warfare and offer political guarantees, German
newspapers say, according to a Geneva dispatch to Le Information.
Preparation of Reply is Delayed.
PARIS.—Differences of opinion on various points of the German reply to
President Wilson has arisen during conference of reichstag groups. As a
consequence the dispatch of the reply to Washington has been postponed for
several days, says Zurich dispatches.
British Did Good Sunday's Work.
LONDON.—Over 3,000 prisoners were captured by the British Sunday
north of Le Gateau when the Selle river was crossed on a wide front.
In the Valenciennes region the British are approaching St. Armand six
miles northwest of Valenciennes. North of Tournai they are pushing for
ward to the Scheldt river line.
Allied forces in Belgium are now within 10 miles of Ghent. The Germans
continue withdrawing on the whole front in Flanders.
French Artillery Alone is Active.
BARIS. —There was no infantry fighting of moment on the French front
last night. Artillery active between Seree and Aisne.
German Reply Received—Wants Details of Evacuation Fixed.
LONDON.—The German reply to President Wilson's note, the text of
which has been received here by wireless says that Germany hopes the
United States will approve of no demand which would be îrreconsilable with
the honor of the German people and with the opening of the way to peace
and justice.
Germany protests against references of President Wilson to "illegal and
inhumane acts of Germany." A denial is made that the German navy has
purposely destroyed lifeboats with passengers. The German government
proposes that the facts in these cases be cleared by neutral commissions.
Germany has dispatched orders to, submarine commanders precluding the
torpedoing of passenger ships. The German government suggests to Presi
dent Wilson that an opportunity be brought about for fixing the details of
the evacuation of occupied territories by German forces.
■a
Huns Make Bitter Fight Against Americans.
WASHINGTON.—Germany is drawing heavily upon other parts of the
western front for reeinforcements to check the Americans north of Verdun,
General Pershing reported in his communique for Sunday. He says:
"During the heavy fighting of the past week constantly increasing num
bers of German divisions have been brought up and they are bitterly con
testing every foot of ground."
Audenrade's Fall Expected Soon.
PARIS.—Allied troops have crossed the Scheldt river at several points in
Audenrade neighborhood, fifteen miles southwest of Ghent. Audenrade has
been encircled and its final fall is expected very soon. The German re
sistance is weakening in this sector.
French in Seven Miles of Ghent.
LONDON.—The French' forces on the allied center in Belgium gained the
bridgehead across the Lys canal at Nevel, seven miles west of Ghent. The
French also gained the bridgehead over the Lys as Grammene. The Ger
mans are attempting to hold the line from Eede to the river Lys at Petegen,
north of Grammene.
Americans Fall Back Before Machine Gun Fire.
WITH THE AMERICAN FORCES NORTHWEST OF VERDUN.—(By
Associated Press.)—Fierce fighting took place in Boise de Rappes on the
western end of the American line today. In the face of. terrific machine
gun fire the Americans were forced to fall back. Later they counter at
tacked and regained a part ?£ .the wr»od. that had been lost.
German Reply Reaches Washington by Wireless.
WASHINGTON.—The wireless version of the German reply to President
Wilson's note reached the state department today. No official comment will
be made until the official text is received.
Believe Huns Trying to Secure Armistice.
WASHINGTON.—Germany's reply to President Wilson as received by
Wireless is regarded here as an awkward attempt to accept the terms for an
armistice as lajfj down by the president.
It is believed certain that the wireless version is garbled to some' extent.
Officials will wait until the official text is received before reaching any
conclusion.
Germany Trying Internal Reforms.
The announcement is made in the wireless report of the text of Germany's
reply to President Wilson, of fundamental changes in the German constitu
tion providing for representation of the people in decisions concerning peace
and war. It is said the present government has been formed in complete
accordance therewith.
Germany claims the sanction of the international law for carrying out
destruction of property during retreats and says that German troops are
under strict instructions to spare private property and care for the popula
tion to the best of their ability.
Where transgressions occur the note says that the guilty are being pun
ished and no future German government will be able to make or hold office
unless it possesses the confidence of a mojority of the reichstag, the note
announces.
Germany agrees that the conditions of an armistice should be left to the
military advisers and that the actual standard of power on botht sides in the
field should form the basis for arrangements.
Hungary to Have Independence.
AMSTERDAM.—Emperor Charles will shortly issue a manifesto to the
Hungarian people announcing the independence of Hungary, according to
a Budapest correspondent.
PALOLSE, Wash.-— G. S. Gritman,
aged 84, a pioneer of this city, was fatal
ly injured at noon Saturday by being
run down by a Ford automobile driven
i
KILLED IT MUSE
AGED PIONEER RUN DOWN BY
FORD CAR SATURDAY EVEN
ING-FUNERAL TODAY
by H. I. Hughes, a wealthy farmer. The
car was standing at the curb on Main
street when Mr. Hughes took his place
at the wheel, forgetting to crank the car.
A young man who was standing near
stepped up and turned the engine over
and was barely able to spring out of the
way of the car, which had been in gear,
whose daughter lives in Moscow now.
In addition to Mrs. Magee, the only
daughter, Mr. Gritman is survived by
his widow and six sons, A number of
Moscow people drove to Palouse to at
Mr. Gritman, who was badly crippled
w ; t }, rheumatism, was standing on the
W alk and was knocked over and crushed
a g a j n st the building, the Ford pushing
; ts wa y p ar t!y through the plate glass
BOND QUOTH TEN PER CENT
window.
Mr, Gritman sustained several bad cuts
about the head and face and was so
severely bruised that death resulted early
this morning,
Mr. Gritman was well known in Mos
He was the father of Mrs. I. L.
cow.
Magee, who made her home here and
tend the funeral, which was held today.
Mr. Gritman was generally known as
"Dad" Gritman and had hosts of friends
in all parts of the Inland Empire, where
he had lived for more than 30 years, his
home having been in Palouse for that
time, but he spent part of the winters
in California.
INFLUENZA CLOSES
STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
CLOSED ALL SCHOOLS IN
STATE OF IDAHO TODAY
The University of Idaho was closed
today for indoor classes, but a number
of classes were held out doors and the
S. A. T. C. and vocational training men
worked as usual. The closing of indoor
classes was ordered in compliance with
the instructions from the state board of
health and not because of any local con
ditions that would warrant it.
There are few cases that are suspicious
among students, but every one has bee "
put in close quarantine for observation.
Every case of a severe cold is being
watched and the person suffering with
it is not permitted on the campus. Stu
dents who live at home are not permitted
to attend the open air classes, but an
opportunity has been given them to take
their bed and bedding to the barracks
and remain under the same rules as the
S. A. T. C. men, but they will be re
quired to pay for their meals.
There is one case of pneumonia in the
vocational training squad, but it is slight.
The patient reached Moscow the last of
last week from a distant point.
all
The Red doing can
for the men under quarantine and will
take charge of the nursing, should any
be required. With more than 1250 stu
dents and soldiers here it is regarded as
remarkable that there are so few cases.
Dr. Lindley, president of the univer
sity, is giving his personal attention to
the work of caring for all who are under
suspicion and has been rushing from one
■barracks to another to see that every
one is comfortable and the health board's'
rules are strictly obeyed.
The situation at the' university is not
regarded as at all serious and it is hoped
to receive permission before long to re
open the school for its regular work.
A sensational story was published i'n
today's Spokesman-Review to the effect
that Spokane women are working over
time on influenza masks for Moscqw,
where 1000 had been ordered for the
S. A. T. C. and the vocational training
men. Dr. Lindley knows nothing of
this and no one here knows who gave
such an order. The story says these
masks are being made for Gonzaga Uni
versity, Spokane, and for W. S. C. at
Pullman. They may have been ordered
by the war department. It is certain
they were not ordered from Moscow. .
Does Not Effect S. A. T. C.
The University of Idaho today re
ceived the following telegram which is
self-explanatory :
"President, University of Idaho,
"Moscow, Idaho.
"You arc ädvised that State Board of
Health has today closed all public and
private schools in the state. State in
stitutions are by this order quarantined
from date — this quarantine to include
administrative forces, instructors and
student body, and will apply to those
living on premises of university. Stu
dents-living in Moscow to'be excluded
from school. Nothing in this order ap
plies to the operation of the S. A. T. C.
"BIWER, Secy."
-fc
Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Hayward are
moving to Spokane. Mr. Hayward has
been expressman on the Northern Pa
cific for several years.
Goes Over the Top!
3
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Latah county took nearly $900,000
worth of the fourth Liberty loan
bonds, being more than 10 per cent
above her quota of $800,000. It is
believed that every precinct in the
county oversubscribed its quota.
When the last reports were received
Saturday night the sales of bonds in
the county totaled $877,350, but some
points had not reported and it is be
lieved that when complete reports are
in the total will be almost $900,000.
Moscow, with a quota of $385,000
took $403,050 worth of the bonds. The
city and county rallied at the last and
came under the wire strong.
It is believed that the nation has
"gone over the top" with the biggest
loan ever floated by any nation in
the world SIX BILLION DOLLARS,
but it will be several days before the
total subscriptions in the United
States are known. Washington an
nounces that the loan, which was
placed at a maximum of $6,000,000,000
is oversubscribed.
Chairman Thanks People.
Latah county takes its place in the
roll of honor on the fourth Liberty
loan.
Our quota ($800,000) seemed im
possibly large, and the fact that Sat
urday evening found us 10 per cent
or more "over the top" is due to the
energy and loyalty of its citizens.
I wish to thank all of those in the
county, as well as Moscow, who have
given of their time and energy in as
sisting me to make this drive a suc
cess.
H. H. SIMPSON,
Uuuuty Chairman, Latah county.
Receive Congratulations.
The following telegram from Chair
man Gwinn, of the state Liberty loan
committee, was received by H. H.
Simpson, chairman of the Latah
county committee today:
H. H. Simpson, chairman, Moscow,
Idaho.—On behalf of Mr. Weeks, cam
paign manager Federal Reserve bank
and Idaho State Liberty Loan com
mittee I congratulate you and all your
co-workers on subscribing full quota
Latah county.
GWINN, Chairman.
Idaho- went well over her quota and
a battle tank will be named in honor
of the state. Following are the sub
scriptions taken in Saturday by Mos
cow banks and not previously re
ported :
Bailey, Fred .
Berry, Carl .
Burch, Frank .
Butterfield Elder Imp. Co. (add) 500
Cameron, W. T.
Chi Delta Phi .
Comstock, J. W.
Cowling, D. R.
Davis, S. P.
Du Partee, W. J.
Gehrett, A. J.
Gibson, J. G. (Add'l).
Gibson, Mrs. J. G .
Hagedorn, Edward (Add'l)..
Hawley, N. M. (Add'l).
Hawley, N. M. (Add'l).
Hendrickson, A. J. (Add'l)..
Henley, Mrs. A. A.
Hodgins, R. (Add'l) .
Johnson, A. H.
Jones, B. J.
Jones, Mrs. B. J.
Jones, Genevieve .
Jones, Marjorie .
Jones, Winifred .
Kasper, Mrs. John .
Kessler, Mrs. Frances F.
Klock, Margaret E.
Leasure, W. H..
Little, Harry J.
Lyon, A. S. (Add'l).
McDaniel, J. A. (Add'l).
McIntosh, Mrs. J. D.
Mclntolh, Miss Katherine ...
Madsen, Niels .
Meek, J. E. (Add'l) .
Mewhinney, Mary .
Moscow Auto Supply Co. ...
Orland, C. J._.
Ostroot, Pauline .
O. W. R. & N. Employees..!
Paul, Charley A.
Peterson, Mrs. Victor .
Rietze, Ferdinand .
Rietze, Hallie .
Roby, Donald L.
Ruehle, Lee A.
$ 60
60
50
200
50
100
50
50
100
300
200
100
100
100
450
100
50
500
200
600
100
100
100
100
160
50
100
1000
60
150
200
50
50
60
50
50
500
100
100
1600
100
50
50
60
50
60
(Continued on page 4.)
RAVE REACHED TOTAL Of 51,056
As an evidence of the important part that the United States troops are
taking in the war the casualty list shows that up to last night there had
been 51,066 casualties in the army, alone, which does not include several
thousand in the marine corps.
Today's casualty list sets a new record, with a total of 1922, in the army
alone. Sunday's list contained 754 in the army and 130 in the marine corps.
Following in Sunday's list:
Rilled in action, 111; missing in action, 78; wounded severely, 260; died
from wounds, 88; died from accident and other causes, 7; died of disease,
65; died from aeroplane accidents, 2; wounded slightly, 3; wounded, degree
undetermined, 140; total, 764.
Total Casualties Up to Last Night.
Killed in action (including 298 at sea) .
Died of wounds.
Died of disease .
9,986
3,460
2,768
1,099
27,967
6,787
Died of accident and other causes.
Wounded in action .
Missing in action (including prisoners)
Total to date .
Marine Corps Casualties for Sunday
Killed in action, 17; died of wounds received in action, 7; died of disease,
8; wounded in action, severely, 39; wounded in action, slightly, 2; wounded
in action, degree undetermined, 10; in hands of enemy, 2; missing in action,
45; total, 130.
51,066
Today's List has 1922 Names.
Following is the casualty list for the American army issued for Monday
morning papers:
Killed in action, 102; missing in action, 165; wounded, degree undetermined,
278; died of aeroplane accident, 4; died of accident and other causes, 9;
died of disease, 186; died of wounds, 112; wounded severely, 166; slightly
wounded, 38; total, 1048.
Afternoon List.—Killed in action, 72; missing in action, 64; wounded, de
gree undetermined, 87; died of disease, 31; died of wounds, 12; wounded se
verely, 321; slightly wounded, 307; total, 884.
ISSUES STATEMENT
SUMMONS M. E. LEWIS TO EX
PLAIN WHY HE DID NOT BUY
' MORE BONDS
The following statement was handed
to The Star-Mirror by PI. H. Simpson,
chairman of the Latah county Liberty
loan committee, whose hard and con
sistent work resulted in Latah county's
heavy quota being rtlised. The state
ment was prepared by Mr. Simpson and
L. F. Parsons, chairman of the Latah
county council of defense. It follows :
"Latah county as announced in our
Saturday's issue went 'over the top' in
fine style on the fourth Liberty bond
drive. The fire bells and those of the
various churches were rung Saturday
evening to announce to the public that
Latah county once again had succeeded
in doing its patriotic duty.
"H. H. Simpson, chairman of the
drive, when interviewed was not able to
give the exact amount of the subscrip
lions of the county, hut he sttaed that
he believed that ' the official figures
would show that Latah county had sub
scribed for ($900,000), and possibly a
little more.
"It required strenuous work on the
part of the committee and the many
citizens throughout the county who took
an active part in the drive to put it
over. AH 'of the patriotic citizens of
the county are now jubilant over the
record made. The chairman of the
drive is asking for an honor flag for
each community, and the county.
"The quota of ($800,000) as fixed by
the state committee was considered by
many to be an unjust one. and it was
feared that it could not he raised. An
endeavor was made to have it reduced,
but without success. The council of de
fense is now taking immediate steps to
see that a just quota be given Latah on
the next drive.
"L. F. Parsons in speaking of the
drive stated that several factors inter
fered with the work of the committee
and the council of defense in putting the
drive over.
"German propaganda to the effect that
Liberty bonds were a graft of the banks,
and were making millions out of it,
caused a great many to hesitate in mak
ing subscriptions. The failure of per
sons of considerable means to come
through and take their quota as assigned
or to take bonds in proportion to their
supposed wealth, hampered the commit
tee to a great extent. The public in
sisted that these persons be forced to
come through. In the majority of in
stances these parties came through when
their duty was properly explained, A
few, however, refused. Those have been
cited to appear before the council of de
fense as rapidly as possible to explain
why. In some of these cases it will be
undoubtedly found that an error has
been made in fixing the classifications
and quotas. It is the purpose of the
council of defense, that no injustice is
done any individual, hut the work of
the council is the work of the public,
aud the public is the final judge as to
the proprietary of an individual's ac
dans in war activities.
"The actions of M. E. Lewis in refer
ence to Libertv loan subscription in this
and the third drive has become a topic
of public comment. Mr. Lewis by the
public is considered .a man of great
wealth. He is rated by many to be
worth from one-fourth to one-half mil
lion dollars, and the general belief is)
that he has not done his part. Mr. Lewis'Camp
has been asked to come before the coun- j
cil and make a statement as to his worth j
so that the council may have the facts
and give them to the public m . U ,:C
to his ability to buy bonds. Besides Mr.
Lewis the following have been called ;
David Dennler, Geo. Dennler, Geo. Hel
fen, Phillip Elvy, James Victory, S. O.
Harrington, Nels Madison, Abe Haynes,
Sig Coleman, W. L. Strohm, E. H. Swan,
Andrew S. Olson.
"The precinct captains of the various
precincts have been instructed to sub
mit their lists as rapidly as possible and
those that have not been considered to
have done their duty be given an oppor
tunity to he heard, and the facts given
to the public, and let them be the judge."
Fhe funeral of Adolph Hendrickson,
who died at Jefferson Barracks. Mo., a
few days ago, was held at the Moscow
lemetery today at 10:30. Rev. J. Quincy
Biggs conducted the services. There was
a military escort for the body. Corporal
James E. Shoptaw. of the 18th company
at Jefferson Barracks accompanied the
body to Moscow.
At 2:30 this afternoon the funeral of
Eldon Phelps, of Moscow, who died at
Bremerton, Ore., Friday, was held at the
Moscow cemetery. Rev. Mr. Biggs de
hvered the sermon and conducted the
services, which were attended by many
friends. A military escort accompanied
the body to the grave,
Mrs. Margaret Eri died at the family
home in the southeast part of town yesr
terday. She was 77 years old and leaves
a husband and one daughter, Mrs. T.
Grendahl. The funeral will be held at
10:30 tomorrow forenoon,
The Star-Mirror office is in receipt of
a large box of fruit, jelly and other
delicacies for the soldiers' mess from
the B. Y. O. F. club. Mrs. J. Shannon
brought two large jars of fruit and pre
serves to the office today for the sol
diers' mess. A lady called and asked
where she could deliver apples for the
soldiers and was told to send them here
and they will be sent to the men who
are in training. This fruit is especially
needed now when a number are in the
hospital suffering with slight cases of
influenza.
- / -^
Grover Nails returned Sunday from
Fremont, having been physically
exempted from service on account of
heart trouble.
ONE DEATH TODAY
TWO SOLDIERS BURIED WITH
MILITARY HONORS—AGED
WOMAN PASSED AWAY
— YS
CHILDREN MUST NOT
CONGREGATE IN MOSCOW
Dr. Adair, city health officer, asks all
families who have cases of influenza to
remain at home until cured. If the peo
ple will obey the voluntary quarantine
regulations and keep all who are afflict
ed with the disease at home until they
fully recover, there will be no flag placed
at that home. But if the people will not
do this they will be officially quaran
tined, flags placed at the homes and they
will not be permitted to leave until the
quarantine is raised and fhe names of all
persons having the disease will he pub
lished. Parents are requested to not per
mit children to congregate in their homes
nor allow them to run to the homes of
neighbors. Every child should be kept,
as nearly as possible, on the premises of
its parents. If these rules are obeyed
the disease.may be stamped out without
an epidemic.
B. Y. O. F. CLUB GIVES
FRUIT TO SOLDIERS

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