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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 24, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-10-24/ed-1/seq-2/

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sunday,
at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City
Moscow
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
», 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress
Ifarch, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Delivered by carrier to any part of city
rer Month ..
Chrec Months
Six Months ..
ÿne Year ....
50c
$1.50
2.75
5.00
By Mail
(outside of city and on rural routes) :
Per Month ..
Three Months
Six Months .
One Year ...
40c
$1.25
2.70
4.00
Member of the Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled to the* use for publication of all
news dispatches credited to it, or not
Otherwise credited, in this paper, and
also to local news published herein. All
rights of republication of special dis-
patches herein are also reserved.
TURNING ON THE SPOTLIGHT.
The dragnet is out in Idaho and the
United States Department of Justice has
begun to sweep the state of the disloyal
element. The arrest at Lewiston and
Orangeville of representatives of the
nonpartisan league on charges of sedi
tion is heralded as the opening gun to
rid the state of an insidious element.
The charges disclose in no uncertain
terms the class of individuals who may
have flocked to the colors of this organi
zation. Thousands of loyal citizens have
been tricked into association with these
people and fed with propaganda that
smirks of Hun intrigue. Clever manipu
lation by the class of men just placed
under arrest has induced loyal citizens
to join this organization. In one breath
they have lauded the war program while
in another they have adroitly sown the
seeds of sedition.
I Despite long delays the federal gov
ernment is starting lo teat the mask from
the disloyal, seditious and traitorous
persons with Bolshcviki tendencies and
pro-Hun sympathies who are hiding be
hind such movements as the Liberty loan
and other patriotic campaigns to conceal
their real intents and purposes. The l.
W. W. has been exposed and its leaders
have been placed in jail for long terms.
Other organizations are due to get
proper attention and, in fact, are getting
it as recent developments show. Too
long have the people and the government
tolerated this disgraceful state of affairs.
The loyal people at home owe it to
the boys who arc wearing uniforms, who
are fighting, suffering and dying for
this nation, to sec that these disloyal
elements are eliminated. This movement
on the part of the government will be
strongly endorsed by all true blue, red
blooded Americans.
The time has come to tear off the
masks ; to place these traitors in their
proper light and to send them to prison
where they belong. In the army and
navy traitors are stood up against a wall
and shot. Surely the traitors at home
should at least be restrained by putting
them in jail. They deserve shooting.—
Wallace Press Times.
PB B*
Again President Wilson lias called
Kaiser William a liar and told him and
the German people that the world will
not take the word of a Hohenzollem for
anything. Either the German people
must take over the reigns of government
and dethrone the kaiser, or surrender
unconditionally. Failure to do one of
these will result in the war being con
tinued and carried to German soil. He
has notified the Germans that no trifling
will be permitted and that Germany
must he placed in a position where she
will have to keep her word with the
other nations. No other ruler in the
world has ever been called a liar by the
ruler of another nation as deliberately
and frequently as has the kaiser. Wil
son makes it plain to the German people
that the only thing standing between
them and peace is the kaiser. To have
peace they must throw him in the dis
card.
n n m
The soldier boys in Moscow want
fruit. • There is an old saying, with much
troth in it, that "an apple a day keeps
the doctor away." Let us give these
soldiers all the fresh fruit they need.
These are some father's and mother's
sons. They are far from home and
many of them arc rick. There are
enough apples wasting on the ground in
,... rT , h . ,
the orchards of Latah county to provide
every soldier in Moscow all the fruit
he' can eat while here. Let us see that
they get it.
Moscow has done nobly in caring for
the siqk during the influenza epidemic
and the results of this splendid cooper
ative work is apparent. Pullman, with
a much smaller population, has had 11
deaths from influenza. Moscow has had
No sacrifice is too great if by it
none,
a life is saved.
Belgium is preparing an itemized bill
which Germany must pay when the war
is over. The bill has now reached a
total of more than two billion dollars
and the Belgium government has only
itemized its damages up to 1915. More
than three more years of suffering,
despoliation and robbery of Belgium will
be added to the bill, probably bring it
eight billion dollars, or 33 per cent more
than the fourth Liberty loan.
American soldiers are demanding
the war be not ended until German
is invaded. In this they voice the senti
ment of the soldiers of all nations
war with Germany. That country must
be invaded and a large strip of her rich
est territory taken to pay for the damage
she has done to Belgium. France, Serbia
and the world at large.
:
COMMERCE COMMISSION
CLAIMS NEW AUTHORITY
WASHINGTON.—The Interstate
Commerce Commission asserted
authority to alter railroad freight
rates initiated by Director General
McAdoo even without the affirmative
showing that they are wrong and an-
nounced that the assumption that
such rates are presumed to be right
and just is incorrect.
-pr,-
PAL TO TOMMY ATKINS
V
„ , . . ,
u Ä a little wiry, P reach terrier.
but a piU to this i.otigly Tommy out on
''No Man's Land." Picked up between
the lines during a raid the little dog and
great big man have become insêfiârir
The terrier has at last found a
8
7
SÛT
: JUSTT&- vöät
T'WS'î
UM
ble.
peaceful home even if it Is only in a
tin hat of a British Tommy.
H
Y" MAN NEEDS SLEEP
Driver Risks Court Martial to Let
Him Get It.
Incident Which Show« How the Y. M.
C. A. Stands With the
Army.
By E. M. BATCHELOR.
'No boys, I'm not so very tired,"
said the Y. M. C. A. secretary. "Just
a little after a week of that," Indlcat
ing with a wave of his hand the conn
try behind, from which came incessant
sounds of artillery and machine-gun
Are.
But he was dead tired, and the am
bulance driver who was giving him
a ride knew It. The secretary's head
bobbed from side to side as the ambu
lance thumped along the rough road.
At Intervals the Y. M. C. A. man slept,
roughly roused whenever a shell-hole
jolt threw him against the side of the
vehicle.
The ambulance was stopped by the
side of the road so that the driver
might tighten a loose bolt.
"I guess I'll lie down for a minute
while you are working," said the Y. M.
G. A. secretary. In a second he was
sound asleep by the road.
An hour later the driver shook him.
"Sorry to wake you up," he said,
"but I absolutely must be getting on.
I'm likely to be court-martialed now
for being so long on this job, but I
would rather take a 'month and a
month' than have robbed you of that
sleep. I decided that the war could
go on for an hour without me, while
you tore off 40 winks."
This is just one of many instances
showing how tile Y. M. C. A. stands
with the army. That driver had vol
untarily risked getting into trouble
with his commanding officer because
he knew the Red Triangle man need
ed sleep.
Today's News Today
K
News from Khaki Boys
Mrs. L. P. Schuh, 106 Adams street,
is iu receipt of the following letter from
her son Louis, who is in France. 1 he
'"''iled from the first port of
call at the end of tlie journey, but, of
course, the name of the port is not
made public. The letter follows:
"Dearest Mother:
"Well, now cheer up, for I know you
are worrying yourself half to death over
me. 1 know that I could cheer you up
if I could hist talk to you for a little
while. 1 can't even write all I'd like to,
for remember this is war time and every
thing doesn't get by.
"All that I can say is that I never felt
better in my life and had less (15 cents).
Everything is just lovely and the trip
has been a grand success so far. We
are only hoping that the rest of it will
he just as successful.
"I hope you folks are all well and
happy.
"Now, listen, please, don't expect me
home on a furlough Christmas any more.
Remember I said I might come. Since
then I have been moving some, and every
time I move I see more plainly where it
elute impossibility for me to get
c:i
away.
Now please remember about the
worry and remember, mama, 1 am doing
now just what I have wanted to do
the last year—namely, flirting with subs.
Xow i can go about with my head
and tell the whole world that I am doing
something worth while. You can
the folks at home that your sons are
'slackers' and cowards.
"Give my regards to all the folks and
love to sis. Tell her I'll write some time
when I am not so 'busy.'
"1 have been on the sea for a good
long while and it probably will be some
time yet before 1 get my feet on good
'terra firma' again. We should worry,
though, it's all for the cause.
"Love from
to
at
"LOUIE.
Latah County Records.
Tuesday, October 22, 1918.
W. D.—Susan M. Crow to George M.
Crow, $400; lots 23, 24, 25-6, Misses A.
A., Lieuallen's • Add. to Moscow.
M. L.—Earl Berry, Moscow, and Clara
Pcasley, Moscow.
M. L.—C. Herman Kroesing, Devon,
Mont., and Lottie G. Paulson, Moscow.
W. D.—Alva B. Towne to Hiram
Lyon, Moscow, $4^50; W 1-2 NE 1-4 36
4Ô-5 W., tract beginning 180 feet east of
SW cor. of W 1 2 NE 1-4 36-40-5 W.
R. M.—Hiram Lyon to First Trust &
Rel.—August Rach to August Bredow,
Savings Bank, $2400; above,
r-m 9-19-10.
C. M.—Alfred Schumacher to First
Trust & Savings Bank, $1800 ; crop on
SE 1-4 S 1-2 SW 1-4 17; SE 1-4 SE 1-4
18; N 1-2 NW 1-4 20-39-4 W.
Wednesday, October 23, 1918,
C. M.-Jesse P. Kidwell to Emil M.
'Jones, $1500; crops on lot 3 of NW 1-4
I SW 1-4; lot 4; NE 1-4 SW 1-2 SE 1-4
SW 1-4 NE 1-4 SE 1-4 NW 1-4 SE
)
I 1-4 SW 1-4 SE 1-4 SE 1-4 SE 1-4 31 :
I SW 1-4 NE 1-4 SE 1-4 NW 1-4 NE 1-4
SW 1-4 NW 1-4 SE 1-4 32- 43-5.
j Rel.— T. J. Huizinga to Thomas Wil
lets. r-m 1-11-13.
j C. M.—Hiram C. Sabin to Arthur
I May. $700 ; eight horses, four calves,
machinery.
I Declaration.—Lizzie Roberts declares
j homestead on lots 5. 6-5, Kendrick ;
! actual cash value, $1200.
Rufus
(3000) : SE 1-4 8-38-2; NE 1-4 NE 1-4
S 1-2 NE 1-4 8-38-2 W., save 30 acres
j (r-m.).
j S. D.—J. J. Campbell to R. J. Ander
( SQn . R j J Anderson vs. J. G. Crawford,
: j c Corbett. Edward Dooley, C. R.
j Swanson andi N. A. Watkns: unknown
owners of NW 1-4 SW 1-4 W 1-2 SW
1-4 SW 1-4 SE 1-4 SW 1-4 SW 1-4 33
38-3. Sold tô R. J. Anderson, $43 02,
R. M— Francis M. Hill to Moscow
State Bank, $8000: W 1-2 NE 1-4 E 1-2
NW 1-4 32-39-4.
May to W. C. May, $3000
++++++♦+♦♦+♦♦+♦
MARKETS
♦ * + ** + + + * + ***<l>*


The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses $2.02%
Wheat, Bluestem, No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk,
net, to 2.02%
; Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, a Teed,
Wheat, White Club, No. 1 bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.00%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, sited
net, delivered to warehouses 2.09%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
j White Beans, per pound
net, delivered to warehouses 1.97%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 sTc'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.06%
No. 1 Peed Oats sacked, per
hundred .
No. 1 Timothy Hay
3.15
$34.00
.08%
Produce.
Produce.
Eggs, per doz.
Butter, creamery, per lb....
Butter, ranch, per lb.
Potatoes, per cwt.
Young chickens, per lb.
Hogs, live wt„ light, per lb...
Old roosters, per lb.
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb... 19 at 20c
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb. ,[email protected]
Veal. live wt.. per lb.6 at 8c
Veal, dressed, per [email protected]
Spring Lambs, per lb.
Mutton, per lb.
50c
65c
60c
$ 1.00
15c
16c
08c
18c
10c
.6 at 8c
Republican Ticket
U. S. Senator
(Long Term)
W. E. BORAH
U. S. Senator
(Short Term)
FRANK R. GOODING
Representative in Congress
(First District)
BURTON L. FRENCH
Justice of the Supreme Court
ALFRED BUDGE
Governor
D. W. DAVIS
Lieutenant Governor
C. C. MOORE
Secretary of State
.ROBERT O. JONES
State Auditor
EDWARD G. GALLETT
State Treasurer
JOHN W. EAGLESON
Attorney General
ROY L. BLACK
Superintendent of Public Instruction
ETHEL E. REDFIELD
Inspector of Mines
ROBERT N. BELL
Judge of the District Coqrt
EDGAR E. STEELE
State Senator
E. W. PORTER
State Representatives
(Vote for Three)
ALFRED S. ANDERSON
HOMER W. CANFIELD
C. J. HUGO
County Commissioner
(First District)
JOHN CONE
County Commissioner
(Second District)
ELMER M. PAULSON
County Commissioner
( Third District)
COLUMBUS CLARK
Clerk of the District Court and Ex
Officio Auditor and Recorder
HOMER E. ESTES
Sheriff
JOHN L. WOODY
County Treasurer and Ex-Officio Pub
lic Administrator and Tax Collector
IONA S. ADAIR
Probate Judge
ADRIAN NELSON
County Superintetfdent of Public
Instruction
LILLIAN M. SKATTABOE
County Assessor
EMMET J. GEMMILL
County Surveyor
HARVEY J. SMITH
Prosecuting Attorney
JOHN NISBET
for
up
To the Voters and Tax Payers
Latah County:
One of the most important duties
of the citizens of Latah
ing just been performed in raising its
quota of the Fourth Liberty Loan,
we are certainly all grateful. But
there are other duties which must be
met by the people of the county.
As chairman of the Republican or
ganization of Latah county I appeal
to you one and all before casting your
ballot on November 5th, 1918, that
f? 0 " stud / Republican ticket care
^ and give it due considérai, jn.
* P. 01 "* wlt J> P. r , lde to th ? "" du ^
°. f Latah county, its economical hand
I lln ® by our county officials and call
your attention to the fact that it is
the best governed county in the state.
The following statement from Byron
Defenbach & Sons, public accountants,
who have audited practically every
county in Northern Idaho, stands as
a strong testimonial to the officials
now directly responsible for handling
the finances of Latah county, and
which statement appears in the Poca
tello Tribune under date of October
3, 1918.
"Comparing the various counties of
county hav
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED
PHONE 248
L. M. KITLEY
fc \
Well Done
We desire to express our admira
tion to the 661 of our patrons for
having loyally subscribed through
us the magnificent sum of $154,
150.00 to the Fourth Liberty Loan.
What has been our loss is the
Government's gain.
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
Always at Your Service.
I
A FOOD
ÖT ^ XCONOt/V
Saving Sugar
and Wheat
Is comfortably
done when one
uses
t:
• i

This cereal food
is composed part
ly of barley and
contains its own
sugar made from
its own grains.
A tmly wonder
ful Foôd, ready
to eat.
the state bv sections from an account
ant's standpoint, the broad general
statement is made that the Northern
counties of Idaho are far superior
those of the. South, and Latah county
is pronounced to be the best governed
county in Idaho."
The governing power of Latah
county has been in the hands of
publican officials for .several years
last past, and our candidates nominat
ed at the primary are known by
to be loyal citizens and thoroughly
capable to handle the affairs of
county if elected.
Again asking your loyal support
and favorable consideration, I fun,
Respectfully yours,
C. (A. IÏAGAN,
Chairman.
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Gisse Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Prop.
Moscow, Idaho.
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
j. a. McDaniel
Moscow, Idaho
Dentist
Phone 229
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
JOHN W. STEVENSON, M. D.
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat
Glasses Fitted
Office of Dr. Aspray, 303 3rd Ave.
Phone 177 '
Go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
for your Harness and Supplies.
Shoes and Shoe Repairing. Par
cels Post Patronage Solicited.
BUSINESS HOUSES AND
POLITICIANS
wanting an up-to-date Mailing List
made from the county records, call
THE STAR-MIRROR
*■
Orland 6c Lee
ATTORNEYS and COUNSELORS AT LAW
Practice in District, State. Federal Courts
Office; First National Bank Bldg.
MOSCOW, IDAHO
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBI.iF
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monument«
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
he found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sure the
First to Have It
*H~ H • ■ I ■ ■ I ■ ■
+
Hotel Moscow *
*
*
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
*
..
+
+
i*
:: Thoroughly Modern *
FIRST CLASS GRILL 4*
• i» «L
[ AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS ?
t

Chas. E. Walks
AUCTIONEER
If you are going to sell and desire
my services, secure your dates as
early as possible, as I sell nearly
every day during the Sale Season.
Thursday, Oct. 24— W. T. Cameron, at
Moscow.
Telephone 278, Office; or 179 J. my
Residence, if you desire a date.
to
Re
all
this
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
WANTED—OFFICE WORK BY WO
man with some experience. Address
M . K„ 914 South Jefferson St.
WAITRESS WANTED AT MOS- ^
21 tf v
24-26
cow Hotel ; also pantry girl.
WANTED—Male
HELP
»
HELP WANTED-PLEASANT
22-tf
Home.
WANTED — A BOY. APPLY AT
Creighton's.
WAK t T*ED — 50 PRLfNÈ PfCkËRâ.
Inquire U. S. Employment Servic e.
15*
WE WANT SALES REPRBSENTA
tives in every town in Idaho. We
prefer men who have sold stock, in
surance, real estate, books, or who
have had no sales experience but
would like to develop into salesmen.
We train every accepted applicant and
provide a system that will enable any
one who works to make from $76.00
to $150.00 per week. Can also use
women of exceptional ability. Posi
tion permanent. In applying state
age, past business experience, num
ber of years you have lived in com
munity, and references. Address in
confidence. KANE MFG. (SL 1626-27
L. C. Smith Bldg., Seattle, Wash.
i
23-26
FOR RENT—Rooms
w~
EOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch ; hot and cold
'■ator ; modern conveniences ; price rea
i nahe. 425 East Third St. Mrs. D.
quhart.
13tf
FOR RENT—LIGHT HOUSEKEEP
ing rooms. Phone 314N. 223 So.
17-tf
Almond.
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 205H.
231-t£
FOR TRADE
WANTED—TO EXCHANGE ONE
two bottom 14-inch gang plow for
three bottom. Phone 9251. J. H. Dye.
289-tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT —6-ROOM HOUSE, 228
South Monroe. Phone 180L.
24tf
FOR RENT, SALE OR TRADE—
Eight room modern house, 446
Lewis St. Rent $15 per month. Phone
19-24
9180.
FOR RENT—AN 8-ROOM MODERN
■ house, near the dormitory; ready
on the 17th of this month. Phone
170J. Mrs. John Shannon.
3-tf
ONE OF OUR MODERN COTTAGES
on N. Jackson St. will be for rent ■*
in a few days. Inquire at Hagan &
Cushing's
6-tf
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—USED BABY BUGGY -
19-24
in good order. Phone 183Y
WANT PIANO FOR WINTER—
Private use. Prof. E. O. Bangs.
18-24
506 E. First St.
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave., Spokane, Wash.
235-tl -
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
291-tf
desk. Telephone 362.
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR SALE—A 5-ROOM MODERN
residence; good cellar and garage.
16°tf
Phone 263H. Fred Stone.
FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODERN
residence ; choice location, corner lot,
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam Silvey.
2S5-tf.
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
244tf
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
FOR SALE — 80 ACRES THREE
miles east of Moscow; house and barn.
Write E. R. Fuller, Lewiston, Idaho, or
see N. G. Gilbertson,
adjoining farm; 6tf
FOR SALE — ONE 16x16 HOUSE,
finished down stairs ; 16-foot plate ;
cheap if taken soon. Phone 9334. 17-23
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
Hubbard squash for sale.
Comstock. Phone 138W.
Frank
23-28
\
FOR SALE — THREE TONS TIM
othy hay, $27. Phone 9417. W. Lang
21-24
don.
FOR SALE
piano in first class condition. Will
not rent. Phone Sundays 279
ONE SCHUMANN "*
19-tf
I
FOR SALE OR TRADE—ONE TWO
ton truck and wood saw combined;
one six H. P. gasoline wood saw.
George W. Smith. Phone 31J 14-26
jpLINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tf
$
FOR SALE—1 DEERING BINDER;
sell for cash or trade in stock. M. J.
Schu, Moscow, Idaho. Rt. 3.
244tf
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane, Wash.
<
235-tf
k
4
FORTSALE—Live Stock
FOR SALE —REGISTERED CHES
ter white pigs, both sexes. Call 927X2.
_13-40
- f
MISCELLANEOUS
LARGE CONCERN WA\TTS ONE - •
good salesman to work out of Mos
cow; must have automobile; $500 surety
bond required. Address O. C. K., Box
21-23».
number 401, Moscow.
FOR SALE—WILL SELL AT PUB
lic auction on the street of Moscow «
Saturday afternoon, October 26, four
good heavy farm horses. Isaac M.*.
Fowler.
4.
22-24

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