OCR Interpretation


The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 24, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-10-24/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

You Need An
Exclusive
Men's Wear
in Moscow
Their styles are better—their quality is higher—
they specialize!
BUT WE MUST QUIT, AS CONDITIONS IN
MERCHANDISE AND HELP CAUSE US TO
LEAVE YOU.
k
While we are here we are giving you the benefit of
reduced prices on Quality Merchandise less than
you can buy low-grade kinds elsewhere. TAKE
THIS TIP from us: "PRICES will be HIGHER
when we are gone."
The Togs
Clothes Shop
"Where Quality Reigns
ar
Weather. — Idaho — Tonight and
Friday probably cloudy with rain
the north.
All those wishing to contribute broth,
jellies, jams or canned fruit for the sick
soldiers at the hospitals please phone
Miss Charlotte Lewis at 153. .Miss
Lewis is a Red Cross dietician and has
been appointed by Mr. Neidig ,to assist
in preparing food for the sick.
The Hi Yu dub sent a box of canned
fruit and jelly to the hospital today.
Benjamin F. Thompson has received
word that his nephew, Amon B. Thomp
son, has arrived safely in France. Amon
Thompson is a Latah comity boy who
was called to the army in July.
J '
Geo. Shepherd of Howell was in town
yesterday.
Mr. and Mrs. Simon Iverson came to
Moscow from Scotts Bluffs, Neh., today
to make their home in this vicinity.
Miss Grace Taggart, who has been
teaching in the northern part of the
state, went to her home at Hay, Wash.,
today.
We are in the market for two cars of
potatoes. Washburn & Wilson Produce
Company. 21-25
Miss Margaret Roberts of Boise has
returned from an anticipated political
tour of Camas prairie country, on ac
count of the epidemic of influenza. Miss
Roberts went to her home today.
Mrs. Ed. Kueher of Canada arrived
today to spend the winter with her pa
rents, Mr. and Mrs. A. Moser, of Colton.
Earl St. John of Davids' is receiving
rariny photographs of soldier boys for
patriotic window display. Mrs. St.
John heard through a sister in the east
of the influenza situation. In Philadel
phia and Albany, N. Y., the restaurants
closed and even the street :ars have
suspended operations.
Mrs. E. O. Bangs, a former resident
of Moscow, but now of Montana, passed
through this city enroute for Lewiston.
Dr. and Mrs. I. R. Boyd w»*nt to Spo
kane today on a short business trip
D. W. Hannah returned yesterday from
Spokane. Mrs. Hannah is recovering
rapidly from the effects of tin; operation
undergone.
Miss Bettie Dowdy was a passenger to
Spokane this morning.
Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Tozicr of Seattle
and Mrs. Bertha Fargie of Spokane are
visiting Moscow and are here in the in
terests of the mica mines near Avon.
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Berry came home
this morning from Spokane.
Fred Stewart of the S. A. T. C. had
his ankle badly sprained while playing
foot ball Wednesday.
Sheriff Campbell went to Kendrick
today.
Ed. Snow came in today from Sand
point where he has been attending a
meeting of the district exemption board.
Judge Forney arrived this morning
from Spokane.
H. E. Heard of Little Potlatch, demo
cratic candidate for auditor, is in the
city.
IS
are
Miss Hilda Larson returned to her
home near Cornwall after a short visit
in Spokane.
Mrs. Alice Storey and son Theodore
has returned to her home on the east
city limits after a year's stay at Sidney,
Montana.
Notice.—On and after October 15,
1918, all work done by me will be strictly
cash. Emer J. Davis, paperhanger. 14-25
Miss Charlotte Lewis has been put
in charge of the diet kitchen of the
temporary hospital located in the
A. K. E. house.
A. Holm returned Wednesday to
B. H. Gnagy of Pullman is here for a
visit with his aunt Mrs. Arbina Crandell
Mrs. Edgar Steele has just returned
of N Jefferson.
from a pleasant visit to. Lewiston and
F. F. Snyder is section foreman on
his home at Seattle after a months
visit in Moscow.
William P. Cassell of Seattle. Wash.,
representing the Home Fire Insurance
company of California is in the city.
Miss Hildor Peterson of Spokane is
visiting her sister, Mrs. Fd. Oberg.
Orville E. Douglas of Meridan, Idaho,
and P. A. Robertson of Weiser, students
of the short eourse at the university,
left for their homes this morning.
Granger rHe.
Mrs. A. H. Chase of Irby, Wash., is
here for a visit with her daughter, Mrs.
F. F. Snyder. Mrs. Snyder went to
Gritman's hospital today for an opera
tion for appendicitis.
the Inland.
A. M. Craig, the drayman, has moved
into one of A. M. Duckett's houses on
North Jackson street.
Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Hill of Palouse
were in Moscow yesterday.
Miss L. Frizzell was a passenger
today to Spokane.
It is reported that N. Williamson
has sold his entire furniture stock to
a Portland firm. Inventory is being
taken today.
WILL AID FARMERS IN
SECURING LABORERS
The county council of defense and
the farm bureau are working together
to secure farm help for Latah county
and ask that all farmers in need of
help telephone either Mr. Parsons, of
the county council or O. S. Fletcher,
county farm agent, at 344, Moscow,
and list their needs. Every effort
will be made by these men to secure
all of the help needed.
LAWRENCE STEPHENSON
FUNERAL TOMORROW
The funeral of Lawrence A. Steph-
enson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew
Stephenson, of near Moscow mount-
ain, who died at Port Angeles, Wash.,
several days ago, will be held from
the Grice undertaking- parlors at 2
o'clock tomorrow (Friday) if the body
arrives before that time. It is ex-
pected the body will reach Moscow to-
night. The funeral services will be
held at the cemetery as indoor fun-
erals are forbidden during the influ-
enza epidemic.
---IS
Hotel Moscow Arrivals.
Thursday, October 24, 1918.
R. H. Bettchcr, Chicago; C. William
son, Seattle; E. Long, Kendrick; A. B.
Morris, Deary ; R. C. Faust, Deary ; B.
X. Firpnett, Kendrick; John Meurer,
New York; H. C. Moody and wife, Spo
kane; H. Latham, Spokane; A. E. Wil
son, Spokane; Mrs. Bangs, Spokane; Ed
gar L. Ludwick, Kennewick; W. .E.
Kennewick ; W. E. Peters, Spokane ;
W, H. Gibson, Mt. Home; W. Cassell,
Seattle; John L. Woody, Kendrick; O.
C. Knight. Seattle; Fred N. Holland.
Moscow; Fred P. Brandt, Moscow; R.
M. Matthews, Spokane ; Miss Mays
Krcmer, Salem, S. D, ; Fred L. Forina,
Spokane ; P. F.' Brott, Spokane ; A. R.
Alinquist, Spokane ; John Cone, Prince
ton ; Walter Burrmann, Walla Walla;
Mrs. Joe Gorte, Walla Walla.
Card of Thanks.
We wish to thank our friends who
have so kindly assisted us during the
loss of our husband and son, Eldon
Phelps. We are grateful for the beau
tiful flowers, the military attendance, the
of automobiles, so kindly loaned, and
the kind svmpathv of all.
MRS. PEARL PHELPS.
C. H. PHELPS,
and Family.
use
THE DAIL> STAR MIRROR MOSCOW IDAHO, THURSDAY. OCTOBER 24,
I
That the arrangement by which Adrian
Nelson has acted as probate judge and
clerk of the district court since April,
, , , , . ,
1917, by which the salary of one official
was saved to the tax payers of the coun
ty will be continued, is assured by the
statement of the republican county plat
form to which both Judge Nelson and
I Homer Estes, county auditor and clerk
of the district court have subscribed,
I The following plank from the republican
I platform is here reproduced.
"We heartily commend the action of
the board of county commissioners of
Latah county in appointing Adrian Nel
son to the office of probate judge and
thereby consolidating the office of the
carry out its provisions.
I
One of the most scathing letters writ
ten by a democrat against the democratic
candidate for congress in this district,
who is opposing Burton L. French, of
Moscow, is that written by Frank liar
ris, a pioneer attorney and leading demo
crat of Weiser, the home of I. 1. Purcell,
nonpartizan candidate for congress on
the democratic ticket. From the Weiser
American, a real newspaper, printed in
Mr. Purcell's home town, we take the
following which should be read by every
voter of Latah county. The article foi
lows :
j "A number of local democrats with a
: history for being democrats recently re
ceived letters from the democratic con
gressional committee asking them to
form a Purcell club in Weiser. So far as
known they all respectfully declined
stating their reasons. Some of these rea
sons are quite plainly stated in a letter
written to the chairman of the commit
tee by Frank Harris, Weiser's well
known citizen and pioneer attorney. The
letter follows ;
"Hon. Scott Ferris,
■'Washington, D. C.
"Dear Sir ; I, have your surprising
request of the 25th of last month, by
which I am requested to assist in the
organization of a 'Purcell for Congress
Club.' To me this is an astounding
1 proposition. T know Purcell. He lives
I here in Weiser, where he has been rttn
; ». in f a republican newspaper for the last
eight years and at the last two elections
I was a defeated republican candidate for
state senator. He was up to two weeks
prior to his nomination as a democratic
candidate, a member of the republican
platform committee, and helped write
the platform the republican candidates of
this state stand on in this election.
"He is a sorehead, because of his de
feat above mentioned, and thinking that
he saw a chance to get into office by
following that socialist, Townley. and
securing a nomination through fraud, he
for the time quit his old alliance and is
now styling himself a 'Wilson democrat.'
"He is certainly a fine specimen to
ask an old line democrat who has stood
by the party through all the years of
adversity and defeat,, to support. No.
you have another guess coming. The
first one you missed a mile when you
guessed that I or any other loyal friend
of the President and our great party
would be instrumental in electing a man
to congress whose nomination was se
cured through fraud.
I
"This man Purcell is a follower of
Townley, who is no better friend to our
great government than is Lenine or
T rotsky to poor distracted Russia.
Townley is a socialist, a supporter of
the principles expressed in the last plat
form of his party, which, as you know,
is treason, pure and simple. Arthur
LeSeuer, an associate and friend of
Debs and Haywood, is the secretary of
the non-partisan league, and if the lead
ers in that unpatriotic organization were
not against this government and heart
LATAH
SHOWS LABOR SHORTAGE
That there is a great shortage of
labor for farm work in Latah county
is shown by the survey of conditions
in this county made by O.* S. Fletcher,
county agent, working with the coun
Mr. Fletcher has
ty farm bureau,
made his report which shows all con
ditions concerning the crop nroduc
ticn problem in tins county. It fol
lows:
The Latah County Farm Bureau has
completed the fai m labor survey of
this county which was started some
time ago. O. S. Fletcher, county ag
ricultural agent, has just finished tab
ulating the results of the survey.
Practically every community in the
county has been covered- However,
not all farms are included. This is
due either to the fact that the local
committeemen of the farm bureau did
not get time to call on every farmer
in their districts, or to the farmers
not being at home when the commit
teemen called. The survey covered
675 farms, with a total of 154,325
acres. Of this land, 120,918 acres
are in cultivation.
Crop Situation.
The total acreage in crops this
year was 103,325 acres. Of this land,
12,831 acres were in alfalfa, timothy,
or other similar crop cut for hay.
Next year it is expected that 99,203
of probate judge at a saving to the tax
payers of more than one thousand dol
£ rs P er anm, ™>. an<1 if f.' ected > Corner
h, Estes. republican candidate for clerk
0 f fli s t r j c t court and ex-officio au
ditor and recorder pledges himself in
the event of Adrian Nelson's election to
the office of probate judge to reappoint
him to the office of deputy clerk of the
district court in order that the same eco
nomical administration may be continued
as that which now exists, and if elected,
Adrian Nelson, republican candidate for
probate judge, pledges himself that he
will continue to perform the duties of
the two offices for the next two years."
To the foregoing statement we give
our full approval and pledge ourselves
and soul with Debs and Haywood in
their unprincipled propaganda in this,
the saddest hour of our nation's life,
they would not associate with this arch
traitor for a second,
"I have lived in Idaho for nearly forty
years and know the history of Haywood
and his bloody gang. I knew the late
Governor Steunenberg, whom Hay
wood's organization murdered, and know
that there was a miscarriage of justice
when this demon was not hanged for
the crime when he was tried here a few
years ago.
Now comes the pitiable spectacle, here
in Idaho, where the blood of Governor
Steunenberg was spilled, of an organiza
tion created and officered by the friends
and apologists of his*murderers, stealing
the machinery of the party of our great
president, setting up candidates, not
democrats, and asking the support of
decent people. These are the facts and
damned be the man or men who will
dispute them.
"I am now growing old, and .as the
years creep on f become the more soli
eitons for our country's good, and cast
my vote accordingly, hence my reason
for declining your astounding proposi
tion. .Why is it that you say nothing
about the organization of a 'Moore for
Senator Club?' Hon. Frank Moore, of
Moscow, is the regular democratic can
didate for senator against W. E. Borah,
who has the indorcement of the Idaho
Bolshevik! who manipulated the nomina
tion of the man Purcell, of whom you
speak. All the followers of Townley,
LeSeuer & Co., including Purcell and
his fellow Bolsheviki candidates are
going to support Borah and knife the
patriotic democratic Moore. A fine com
himUion to contemplate is this.
"Dr. W. R. Hamilton, of this place,
late chairman of the state democratic
central committee, informs me that lie
got a letter of the same import as that
I am now answering, and informs me
that his answer thereto, will not encour
age you much in the organization of
'Purcell for Congress Clubs,' and Lean
assure you that he speaks the sentiments
of thousands of loyal democrats who
intend to work and vote for Gooding,
republican, and Moore, democrat, for
senators, and French for representative.
"I have two boys over in France, of
whom I am intensely proud. They both
volunteered within a month after the
declaration of war, and I will not assist
any candidate put forth by an organiza
tion who would see them murdered for
doing their patriotic duty.
"I take it that you are not fully in
formed as to conditions in Idaho, else
you 'would not he making such an ap
peal to democrats, and I hope that you
will seek and receive information that
will put j'ou right to the end that the
efforts of your committee to elect Pur
cell or any other Townleyite to coll
gress may cease.
"Truly yours,
"FRANK HARRIS.
acres will be in crop, 11,425 acres of
j which will be hay crops. (These fig
ures do not include grains cut for
I hay.) This year 17,593 acres were
! summer-fallowed, while it is expected
, that 21,715 acres will be summer-fal
lowed next year.
Labor Situation.
On the farms covered by the survey
there are 570 able-bodied men of
draft age, and 286 able-bodied men or
boys over sixteen years of age, and
not of draft age. This gives a total
of 866 able-bodied men and boys liv
ing on these farms. The survey shows
that a total of 861 men are ordinarily
used the year around- on these farms,
and that 924 year around men are
necessary to keep the farms up to
maximum production. These figures
show that there is a shortage of year
around men at present. These figures
do not consider the extra men needed
for the planting and harvesting sea
sons. The number of these extra men
that are needed is as follows: 23 dur
ing March, 193 during April, 171 dur
ing May, 139 during June, 410 during
July, 808 during August, 533 during
September, 74 during October, and a
few during November.
Only two men reported land as idle |
the present year for lack of farm j
help. Forty three acres were idle for
1918
ROLLEfSON'S
PHONE
FREE
351
DELIVERY
Friday and Saturday Specials
QUALITY ALWAYS
QUICK SALES
SMALL PROFIT
Dromedary Instant Tapioca, pkg.
Corn Flakes, 2 packages .;. .
Aunt Jemima Pancake Flour, with Powd. Skim Milk, pkg
Rye Krisp Health Bread, pkg.
Shilling's High Grade Steel Cut Coffee, pound..
Rex Concentrated Lye, can ..
Del Monte Sardines in Tomatoes, Mustard and Sauced,
large can .
Shrimp, Dry Pack, can .
I .12
.25
.18
.40
.40
.12
.22
.18
this reason. A few farms reported
a surplus of farm help, and some men
stated that they could work for their
neighbors part of the year. Consider
ing the large number of extra men
that are needed during the busy sea
sons, the labor outlook in Latah coun
ty is not very encouraging.
BUTTER PRICES
Î0 BE CONTROLLED
I
\
i
I
W ASHINGTON, OREGON AND
IDAHO TO HAVE UNIFORM
PRICES AND REGULATIONS*' !
_____ '
. 1 I
A meeting of representative butter
manufacturers and dealers of the Nortli ,
west, representing the states of Wash- 1
ington. Idaho and Oregon, was held ai i
the office of W. B. Ayer, federal food
administrator for Oregon, Monday, Oct. j
21. The food administration was rep j
resented by Charles Hebberd of Wash-i
ington ; Professor Alfred Atkinson of I
Montana; W. K. Newell of Oregon, and j
R. F. Bicknell of Idaho. It was agreed ;
at this meeting that no increase should
IT'S NOT YOUR HEART;
IT'S YOUR KIDNEYS
Kidney disease is no respecter of
persons. It attacks all classes, re
gardless of age, sex or conditions. A
majority of the ills afflicting people
today can be traced back to the kidney
trouble.
The kidneys are the most important
organs of the body. They are the
filterers, the purifiers, of your blood.
If the poisons which are swept from
the tissues by the blood are not elim
inated through the kidneys, disease of
one form or another will claim you as
a victim.
Kidney disease is usually indicated
by weariness, sleeplessness, nervous
ness, despondency, backache, stomach
trouble, difficulty when urinating,
pain in loins and lower abdomen, gall
stones, gravel, rheumatism, sciatica
and lumbago.
All these derangements are nature's
signals to warn you that the kidneys
Too Hot to Bake?
Then Buy Victory Bread
Made in Moscow
Fresh Daily, Bread, Cookies, Cakes, Doughnuts.
Complete line of Baker's Goods at popular
prices.
You can buy it cheaper than you can bake it.
EMPIRE BAKERY
Phone 25«
Phone 250
u
D
m
Make Next Washday Easy
m
Ü
m
Ü
Yes—Get .he biggest washing out and on the line before 10 o'clock,
No laundicss required. Push a button and the THOR will do the s
work. Ng wages to pay anyone. No meals to serve. What a dif- *
ference between this anß the old wasteful way of wearing out the |
clothes on i washboard and rubbing and wringing most of the day! I
m
ilni
m
Electric
Washing Machine
dees a good s.zed washing in an houx. Costs only 2c an hour for electricity.
Positively the ,nost economical way to wush. The THOR actually pays for
itself as it goes along. It saves more than it costs. Over 130,000 women have
already proved that in their homes. Come and we will prove it also. We will
show you how to get better washing done for less than it costs you now.
$5.00 BRINGS THE THOR TO YOUR HOME
Then $5.00 a month until paid for, and it is yours. Sold on our
guarantee that it will do all we claim or your money back.
Come this week- come before next washday. Let us show you how it
saves money and drudgery and gives a woman a day of leisure.
Co.
Washington Water P
ower
be made in butter quotations by the
trade without the same having been ap
proved by the federal food administra
tors of Oregon and Washington. Rep
resentatives of the trade in the various
cities are to hold regular meetings on
Monday of each week not later than
2 o'clock p. m. If any increases are
necessary they shall communicate with
representatives of the trade in other
northwest cities and their request for
such increase be submitted to the ofîVge
of Mr. Hebberd and Mr. Ayer promptly
at 2 o'clock p. m. on Monday with a
statement of the definite reasons for the
increase desired, giving in full the mar
ket conditions which would warrant such
increase. Approval or rejection shall be
given by the federal food administrators
in time for publication early Tuesday
morning. All price quotations shall be
on the basis of solid pack cubes with one
cent differential for prints. As a con
servation measure it was agreed that no
butter be sold in cartons after October
31, 1918, until May 1, 1919. 'I bis action
was taken as the result of a joint confer
once of the federal food administrators
of Washington, Oregon, Montana and
Idaho. Food Administrator Bicknell
said Wednesday that the prices named
would govern in Idaho and that he had
left the handling of the matters to the
administrators of Oregon because those
slates were consuming other than pro
ducing states.
need help. You should use GOLD
MEDAL Haarlem Oil Capsules im
mediately. The soothing, healing oil
stimulates the kidneys, relieves in
flammation and destroys the germs
which have caused it. Do not wait
until tomorrow. Go to your druggist
today and insist on his supplying you
with a box of GOLD MEDAL Haar
lem Oil Capsules. In twenty-four
hours you should feel health and vigor
returning and will bless the day you
first heard of GOLD MEDAL Haar
lem Oil.
After you feel that you have cured
yourself, continue to take one or two
capsules each day, so as to keep in
first-class condition and ward off the
danger of other attacks.
Ask for the original imported
GOLD MEDAL brand. Three sizes.
Money refunded if they do not help
you.

xml | txt