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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 25, 1918, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1918
► VOLUME VIII
NUMBER 24
GERMANS DEMAND ABDICATION OF KAISER
The German populace at Berlin have openly demanded the abdication of
the kaiser and the formation of a republic. A mob composed of thousands
gathered before the reichstag building and made these demands.
Austria has notified Germany that she intends to ask for a separate peace
and will seek terms for surrender.
Turkey announces, through the grand Visor that she will accept President
Wilson's terms.
American representatives arrived in France today to attend a conference
of all the allied nations for the purpose of considering Germany's peace
terms.
These are the important items of news coming from the seat of govern
ments in Europe today but they are supplemented by further good news
from the fighting front showing continued successes of the allied armies on
all fronts. The Italians, assisted by British and French, started a new drive
against the Austrians with much success, despite unfavorable weather con
ditions.
The j American forces, who are bearing the brunt of the fighting on the
western front, have succeeded in driving the Germans out of strongly de
fended positions despite the most stubborn resistance.
British, French and Belgian forces have taken more towns, prisoners and
guns from the retreating Huns.
The telegraphic and cable news received today follows:
German Mob Demands Abdication of Kaiser.
PARIS.—Enormous crowds assembled before the rechstag building in
Berlin yesterday calling for the emperor's abdication and the formation of
a republic, according to the Zurich Dispatch.
Dr. Karl Liebknecht, socialist leader, who was just released from prison,
was applauded frantically. He was compelled to enter a carriage filled with
flowers from which he made a speech declaring the time for the people to
rule has arrived.
Sir Eric Geddes Reached London.
WASHINGTON.—Sir Eric Geddes, first lord of the British admiralty,
arrived safely in London today, returning from a special mission to the
United States.
Turkey Will Accept Wilson's Terms.
BASEL.—Turkey will accept peace based on the principles of right and
jqstice laid down by President Wilson which the new Turkish government
approves, Grand Visor Tewfik Pasha is quoted in a Constantinople dispatch
as having stated in parliament.
Americans Win in Desperate Fighting.
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMY NORTH OF VERDUN.—(By Associated
Press.)—The Americans, despite strong German artillery fire improved
their positions at three important points along the front east and west of
Meuse during last night.
East of the Meuse the Americans drove the enemy from the eastern edge
of Bois Donnent gaining their objective. In the Grand Pre region and
west of the Meuse the Americans straightened their line and captured some
very important ridges.
Between Rappe Wood and Bantheuvill wood the Americans' line was ex
tended despite stubborn resistance. Heavy German attacks east of the
Meuse were thrown back early today by the American troops who are now
holding the wood and lines on either side. The German« are using heavy
Machine guns and heavy cannon extensively.
French Repulse Attacks—Resume Pressure.
PARIS.—(Official.)—In the Long Champs region where the French are
east of Sambre canal two heavy German attacks repulsed on the front
along the Serre river and eastward. The French today resumed their
pressure against the enemy.
The French are advancing northeastward between Oise and Peron, a trib
utary of the Serre river, and penetrated the village of Villers-Le-Sec and
surrounded the village of La Ferte, northeast of Ville Sec. The French
made some advance further east along the Serre river and Sowl Serre and
Souches.
I
Serbian« Rout Austrians Again.
LONDON.—A Serbian official dispatch says; "The Serbians have de
feated the enemy in the Great Moravia river valley. The enemy is retreating
in complete disorder.
Italians Capture 3,000 Austrians.
ROME.—(Official.)—In bitter fighting yesterday in the region of Grappa
Ornic river and captured 3,000 prisoners.
British and French troops are aiding the Italians in the new offensive
against the Austrians and their attacks are meeting with considerable suc
cess, notwithstanding unfavorable weather conditions.
British Take Town of Les Tullries.
BRITISH HEADQUARTERS.—(By Reuter's Telegraph Co.)—South of
Valenciennes the British have captured the town of Les Tuilries, east of
Solesmes.
French Take Two More Villages.
LONDON.—The French havç , crocOid the Serre river between Crecy and
MorF ,fe '8. Farther northeast they have taken the villages of VesIes-et-Cau
mont and PierresponL
Col House in France to Represent U. S. at Peace Meeting.
WASHINGTON.—Colonel House, personal representative of President Wil
son and the state department's spokesman, and Admiral Benson, chief of
naval operations, arrived in France this morning to represent the United
States in the consideration of Germany's plea for an armistice and peace
negotiations.
British Take More Towns.
LONDON.—(Official.)—The British captured Haing, southeast of Valen
riennes and also Vendigies-Sur-Ecaillon on the front below Valenciennes.
German counter attacks were repulsed. Fighting was resumed this morning.
French Take Towns and Prisoners.
PARIS.—(Official.). .On the Aisne front east of Bethel the French have
captured the villages of Ambly and Fleury and have taken more than 100
German prisoners.
American Casualties are Lighter.
There are only 513 names in today's casualty lists, the smallest number
in several weeks. The list issued for morning papers follows:
Killed in action, 17; died of wounds, 10; died of accident and other causes,
1; died of disease, 4; wounded severely, 82; wounded, degree undetermined,
61; wounded slightly, 92; missing in action, 6; died from aeroplane accident,
2; total, 264.
Afternoon List.—Killed in action, 4; died of wounds, 1; died from acci
dent and other causes, 2; died of disease, 2; wounded severely, 14; wounded,
degree undetermined, 137; wounded slightly, 77; missing in action, 8; pris
249.
POLITICAL WRITER
VISITS MOSCOW TODAY
Arthur Wonsettler, political writer for
The Spokesman-Review, is in Moscow
today. Mr. Wonsettler has had many
years of experience in politics in the
northwest and is touring the 10 northern
counties to "get a line" on the political
situation. He predicts that, taking five
counties north of Latah, in which he has
been in the
ernor and
senator, will have a clear majority, de
spite the fact that Bonner county is
Samuels' home and the labor and I. W.
W. element which is strong in many of
these counties will rote solidly for Nu
gent and Samuels. Mr. Wonsettler pre
dicts that in Shoshone county, the ban
ner democratic county of Idaho, where
past week, Davis for gov
Gooding for United States
Samuels was formerly prosecuting at
torney, he will be beaten by from 3,000
to 4,000 votes by Davis, and that Good
ing will get a clear majority over Nu
gent, who defended Bill Haywood, the
notorious I. W. W. leader, when the
latter was charged with the murder of
Governor Steunenberg.
TWO HEADED CALF
HELPS RED CROSS
E. J. Armbruster today turned over
to the local chapter of the Red Cross
$9,75 which he collected from persons
who saw the two-headed calf while it
was alive; The calf is being mounted
in Spokane and when the work is fin
ished will be turned over to the Red
Cross for exhibition purposes to raiso
money for the organization.
ONE DEATH FROM INFLUENZA
GENERAL SITUATION IS BETTER
The first death from influenza oc
curred early this morning when Miles
Jordan Davis, of Gillette, Wyoming,
died after a lingering illness with
pneumonia, following influenza. The
young man was just 21 years old and
was a member of the vocational
training corps. He was taken sick
before entraining for Moscow and was
quite ill when he reached here. His
condition has been critical for sev
eral days. He had never been able
to take the physical examination.
His mother, Mrs. May Davis, and
a friend, Mrs. Southworth, of Gillette,
Wyoming, arrived at noon today and
are being cared for at the home of
President and Mrs. Lindley. They
will return to their home with the
body tomorrow, leaving on the morn
ing train. An escort from the voca
tional training school will accompany
the body.
The other case of pneumonia, that
of Private Cross, also of Wyoming,
who was not expected to live, is re
garded as slightly improved with
some chance of recovery.
The general situation is reported
better today. In the S. A. T. C. and
vocational training corps, with more
than 800 members, six new cases were
admitted to the hospital and two were
discharged as cured. All of the cases
Circularizing is growing popular as
election day draws near. H. F. Samuels,
nonpartizan candidate for governor, is
sending circulars to Latah county voters
asking their support. Circulars from
I, W, W. headquarters asking support
for John F. Nugent, nonpartizan candi
date for United States senator are also
being received here. A. L. Morgan, the
well-known attorney, of Moscow, re
ceived' orte of Mr. Samuels' circular let
ters and "took his typewriter in hand"
and answered it. The Star-Mirror is
privileged to give a copy of Mr. Mor
gan's answer to its readers. The letter
of Mr. Morgan is surely an able one,
going straight to the mark and every
word of it should be read by the voters
of this county. The letter follows:
"October 24, 1918.
"Mr. H. F. Samuels,
"Boise, Idaho.
"Sir : I have before me your letter
dated October 20, in which you say: T
wish to state frankly and briefly my
position on questions of unusual and
vital importance.'
"In these troublous times when I am
my
support for any man, I feel that it is
meet and proper that I propound to him
such pertinent questions as may suggest
themselves to me with reference to his
right to claim my suffrage in his behalf
or those with whom he is associated.
"In your said letter you say that during
the present emergency all that Idaho
has should be placed at the disposal of
the president to be used by America's
forces, and you also say, 'our one great
purpose at this time is to win the war.'
In view of the fact that the non-partizan
league was openly and notoriously
against the war, opposed to the draft,
and not in sympathy with war measures
until it became apparent to the leaders
of that organization that such course
was suicidal, I would like to have you
tell me what you have to offer by way
of showing that the change of front so
recently made by the leaders of this
organization is a bona fide reformation
and not merely a ruse to trap the un
wary.
"Your letter is apparently intended to
lead me to believe that if elected to the
high office of governor you would give
to the state of Idaho an administration
along lines calculated to bring the utmost
good to our citizens. In yesterday's issue
of the Moscow Star-Mirror one of the
reputable citizens of Moscow is quoted
as making the statement that during the
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are light and the situation is regard
ed as greatly improved. It is believed
the worst is over.
All Doctors Helping.
In reporting the influenza situation
yesterday the statement was made
that all of the doctors of Moscow are
doing all in their power to control the
situation, and the names of several
were given. Inadvertently the names
of Drs. Hatfield and Leitch were omit
ted from the list. These men are do
ing as much as any men can do to
help in the great work that is taxing
the strength of all of the doctors of
Moscow.
Capt. Felker Optimistic.
Capt. Luther Felker, commanding
officer of the University of Idaho S.
A. T. C. said late Thursday afternoon
that the Spanish influenza situation
was well in hand. Captain Felker
said: "The situation is well in hand.
Weather conditions are good for the
stamping out of the epidemic,
have every reason to believe that
would be in their own homes. All those
are being cared for better than they
would be intheir own homes. All those
who show '■any temperature are im
mediately put in bed. They are in
comfortable quarters with ample care
and every convenience."
We
the
Coeur d'Alene riots in an interview with
yon (you at that time being the prose
cuting attorney of Shoshone county),
you said that the parties who were then
being investigated and who were sus
pected of blowing up the Bunker Hill
mill were your friends and business asso
ciates and the men who had elected you
to office. Upon this ground you refused
to prosecute them. May I inquire, Mr.
Samuels, if you happen to be elected to
the office of governor of this state, will
you entertain like ideas toward the men
who are responsible for your candidacy,
toward the leaders of the non-partizan
league? Will you, having been faithful
to the outlaws that terrorized the Coeur
d'Alenes, be like faithful to the expo
nents of the I. W. W. and the non
partizan league? Will you, having re
fused to be bound by your oath to en
force the law as prosecuting attorney for
Shoshone county, because the men ac
cused were your friends, business asso
ciates, and political backers, turn over
the affairs of the state to your politicaj
backers in the present campaign?
would like to know from just what point,
if elected, will executive control
I
of our affairs come ? With whom are
you most friendly and to whom are you
going to attribute your election, the non
partizan league or the I. W. W.? Or
will yon give to both the credit, and will
you get your instructions, on account of
your friendship, jointly from Townley's
headquarters in St. Paul, and Bill Hay
wood's headquarters in a federal prison
cell? Since you were true to your
friends in the past and since admittedly
the organizations above referred to, and
which are headed and controlled re
spectively by the men named, who are
your friends, it becomes a vital question
to me just what your attitude will be
toward these men and just what, if any,
control they are going to exercise over
you after election?
"You say in your letter : 'Let ns save
for our returning heroes a goodly share
of Idaho's natural resources.' Taking
the admitted fact that the non-partizan
league and the I. W. W. are combined
together in this campaign as a basis from
which to consider the matter, it is a
wonderful heritage you propose to have
in readiness for 'Idaho's sons and
daughters' upon their return. Less than
a year ago it was necessary for the citi
zens of Idaho to organize four militia
companies for no other purpose than
to protect our state against a particular
|
(Continued on page 3)
COLLEGE CORN
YIELDS 84 BUSHELS
RECORD YIELDS REPORTED
SEED PLATS OF UNIVERSITY'S
FINE FARM
The agricultural college of the Uni
versity of Idaho has just harvested
corn that yielded an average of
bushels per acre. This corn is known
as "Rustler's white dent," the seed be
ing obtained from Minnesota several
years ago. This was grown in the
seed plat at the college farm by
W. Hulbert, who has charge o
farm crop work of the college.
The corn was grown from selected
seed, each row being planted with
seed from one ear of corn. Seven
of the rows gave yields averaging
over 100 bushels and one row went
126 bushels. The corn is well ma
tured, firm and of fine quality.
was harvested about October 1, but
has only been measured and the re
port tabulated recently.
The corn was planted May 22 and
harvested October 1, making a short
season. Last year this corn was tried
with many other varieties and found
to mature earlier than any of them.
For that reason it is regarded as
good corn for this northern country
where the seasons are short.
The agricultural college raised 25
acres of corn for silage this year and
got an average of seven tong per
acre. There are four big silos on the
college farm with capacity of between
350 and 400 tons and they are all
filled with feed for the stock this
winter. There was not enough corn
to fill all of them and peas and oats
were used as silage to some extent,
both being cut while green. This
combination is regarded as very good
silage, almost equal to com. Alfalfa
mixed with peas and oats has given
satisfactory silage at the college
farm, sheep being fattened on it last
year.
of the
RALPH BROMS
WIFE IS
FORMER RESIDENT OF MOSCOW
ESCAPES FROM SPOKANE HOS
PITAL WHILE SICK
Mrs. Emma Brownlow, wife of
Ralph Brownlow, former linotype op
erator for the Idaho Post and a resi
dent of Moscow for a long time, is
seriously ill with influenza at Spo
kane and while delirious escaped from
the hospital. Mr. Brownlow is "over
seas" having been sent across after he
had completed two months of train
ing in the vocational training school
at the University of Idaho, being a
member of the first
the university. The following from
the Spokane Chronicle tells of Mrs.
Brownlow's escape from the hospital:
Mrs. Emma Brownlow, a delirious
patient at the influenza hospital, es
caped through a rear window, and,
after obtaining a nickel from the
landlady of a nearby lodging
called the police station yesterday af
ternoon. She asked that officers be
sent with the patrol wagon to take
her home.
The police responded and returned
Mrs. Brownlow to the hospital, but
she was later taken to her home at
S128 Thorpe stree, as there is not suf
ficient help at the hospital for a per
sonal guard. Her condition is said
to be much improved today.
class of 100 at
house,
F
F.
A. DAVID GETS
STATE APPOINTMENT
WELL KNOWN PIONEER MERCH
ANT APPOINTED LABOR COM
MISSIONER YESTERDAY
F. A. David, pioneer merchant of Mos
cow, has been appointed labor commis
sioner for northern Idaho, to succeed
A. W. Laird of Potlatch, who resigned
last spring. The law provides that one
republican and one democrat be appoint
ed—one an employer and the other an
employe. W. J. A. McVety, a democrat
and an employe, is the other member of
the board. Mr. Daird represents the
employers and the republican party.
The appointment came as a complete
surprise. Mr. David & Sons have one
of the largest department stores in north
ern Idaho, which they have operated for
■«lore than 20 years. Mr. David owns
a farm at Burley, Idaho, and was en
route to the farm and stopped off for
a day at Boise when Governor Alex
ander tendered him the appointment
which he accepted and proceeded from
Boise to Burley last night. The first
intimation of the appointment came in
a telegram from Boise today, announcing
that he had been appointed.
The local draft board is arranging
the list of Latah county registrants
of September 12 ,1918, in the order
in which they were drawn and has
prepared the list of more than half
of those registered. Following is the
order in which they were drawn, be
ginning where the last list published
left off:
Sever Nelson, Kendrick ..
Daniel W. Woolsey, Bovill
William M. Christiansen, Viola.... 1612
John H. Schmidt. Potlatch.
William L. Hays, Mosco.w
Marcel E. Malige, Moscow
Jesse P. Benjamin, Troy..
Thompson D. Matthews, Moscow.. 1617
Thomas F. Nichols, Avon....
Otis Wm. Smith, Moscow...
William A. Duncan, Moscow
Teman I. Kjoratad, Moscow.
Archie C. Clark, Juliaetta....
Frank M. Erickson, Moscow.1623
Ludvig C. Oleson, Moscow.
Arthur E. Anderson. Troy
Frank F. Hays, Bovill.....
Bettiol Carlo, Potlatch ...
Arthur F. Yaggy, Moscow.
James H. Dye. Moscow....
Benjamin E. Callison, Kendrick.... 1630
John Sinclair, Princeton ..
Miles M. Beasley, Moscow
Charles H. Kraut, Genesee
Clyde H. Witter, Moscow.1634
Nels Nelson, Troy .
John D. MacFarlan, Genesee..
John I. Kitch, Troy.
Gus H. Kinman, Harvard.
Samuel P. Hall, Moscow.
Edward A. Cruver, Moscow.
Anton L. Eid, Moscow.
Ernest A. Emerson, Genesee.
Lera E. Potter, Potlatch.
Thomas A. Shollenbiirg, Viola
Clarence Bumgarner, Moscow.
Reuben C. Ackerman, Potlatch
Harry H. Stern, Moscow.
Nels Bakken, Moscow .
Fred S. Casebolt, Genesee.
Ernest A, Boemeke, Juliaetta,,
Lee Nelson, Genesee .
Bennett L. Williams, Moscow
1610
1611
1613
1614
1615
1616
1618
1619
1620
1621
1622
1624
1625
1626
1627
1628
1629
1631
1632
1633
1635
1636
1637
1638 '
1639
1640
1641
1642
1643
1644
1645
1646.
1647
1648
1649
1650
1651
1652
Antonios P. Pagonis, Spokane, Wn.1653
Frank J. Broemmeling. Genesee.... 1654
Howard Howell, Palouse, Wn.1655
Wallace H. Wincgard, Bovill
Ottis R, Hesseltine, Moscow.
Tim J. Sullivan, Moscow....
Carl Olson, Troy .
Jules V. Hull, Viola.
Oscar C. Aiken. Kendrick .. .
Oscar R. Wilcox, Garfield, Wn....l662
Nels Smiset, Potlatch .1663
William Lowe. Farmington, Wn....l664
Chris G. Miller, Genesee....
Joe Jovanovich, Bovill .
Bruco H. Wardrobe, Genesee
Leonard C. Nelson, Troy....
Charles F. Stone, Moscow....
Wallace G. Hutchinson, Juliaetta.. 1670
Enos C. Cornwall, Genesee.
Sigurd L. Johnson. Harvard
Harry Streeter, Bovill.
Pete Konoff, Spokane, Wn.
Thcophite Duffany, BoviH
1656
1657
1658
1659
1660
1661
1665
1666
1667
1668
1669
1671
1672
1673
1674
1675
Fred Strohm, Troy .1676
M. A. Palmer, Farmington, Wn....l677
1678
Erick E. Equist, Potlatch....
Russell T. Witty, Bovill.
Joseph E. Manson, Viola.
Charles T. Nelson, Kendrick
Floyd W. Gail, Moscow.
Peter Olson, Troy ..
DeWitt C. White, Bovill....
Joseph H. Mattson, Troy....
John C. Psaropulos, Potlatch
Toney Anton, Spokane, Wn.
Fred A. Deerkop, Palouse, Wn....I688
Charles G. Smith, Moscow. ..1689
Earl G. Espy, Garfield, Wn.1690
Knute T. Myklebust. Troy.1691
Edward E. Skeen, Troy.1692
James E. Browning, Potlatch.1693
Wallace Wm. Whitcomb, Potlatch. 1694
Joseph Slouber. Moscow .
James H. Campbell, Princeton.
William F. Johnston. Troy....
Noah S. Steele, Potlatch.
Nils O. Widstrand, Troy.
Michael P. Burrows, Potlatch
Melvin Sneve. Kendrick .
Sam Piccolo, Rathdrum .
Harry F. Taylor, Helmer .
William F. Lesley, Moscow...
George Wm, Shepherd, Moscow... 1705
.1706
.1707
.1708
.1709
.1710
.1711
.1712
.1713
.1714
.1715
.1716
.1717
1679
1680
1681
1682
.1683
1684
1685
1686
1687
1695
1696
1697
1698
1699
1700
1701
1702
1703
1704
George E. Colbeck, Moscow.
John L. Drew, Moscow.
Walter H. Tarbox, Bovill...
Harvey D. Shaffer, Potlatch.
John Wm. Rothwell. Viola..
John Wm. Mosnian. Genesee
Frank A. Hanna, Moscow...
William W. Nelson. Moscow
Will F. Nolan, Moscow.
Willard A. Mallery. Moscow
Philip Lettenmaier, Moscow
Henry Moe, Palouse, Wn...
William J. Roberg, Kendrick
Walter Wm. Overlander, Moscow.. 1719
Per Storm. Kendrick
Joseph Buck, Deary .
William J. Humphrey, Moscow.... 1722
John D. Sandberg, Troy.
Earl M. Christenson, Moscow.
Walter D. Humiston, Potlatch
Charles J. Bower, Avon.
Charles E. Shrope. Bovill.
Filson R. Van Wert, Potlatch.
James Milton, Palouse, Wn...
James A. Swatman, Garfield, Wn..l730
August Danielson, Farmington, Wn.I731
Leonard J. Ross, Princeton..1732
Robert C. Heimgartner, Juliaetta.. 1733
Charles Dagman. Moscow ...
Asa Vinson Norris, Viola.....
Ray Wm. Bugh, Troy.
r ederick S. Stroebel. Genesee.1737
Evan J. Rees, Farmington, Wn.... 1738
James Roy Pelnar, Bovill .1739
Clarence H. Campbell, Troy..
Edward H. Mains, Potlatch.
Thomas F. Geer, Genesee....
Frank Wm. Bagley, Potlatch
1718
1720
1721
1723
1724
1725
1726
1727
1728
1729
1734
1735
1736
1740
1741
1742
1743
(Continued on page 4.)

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